Page 21 of 124 FirstFirst ... 1119202122233171121 ... LastLast
Results 201 to 210 of 1233

Thread: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

  1. #201
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Beans
    90
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    allright, thanks for the hasty responce, I'll just keep track of this when I can, good luck to you, and by the way, when you get there what are the odds of me being able to play stuff like Diablo and Half life and star craft? since all of thoes games can run on the specs.

  2. #202
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Beans
    15

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DonutFUN View Post
    allright, thanks for the hasty responce, I'll just keep track of this when I can, good luck to you, and by the way, when you get there what are the odds of me being able to play stuff like Diablo and Half life and star craft? since all of thoes games can run on the specs.
    The chances of playing games like those is quite low, I'm afraid. They just aren't powerful enough (not to mention these are ARM machines, not x86 machines.)
    Last edited by Matriark TerVel; January 24th, 2010 at 07:35 AM.

  3. #203
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Beans
    93

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DonutFUN View Post
    So what ended up happening with this forum? did you get linux on it? and if so do i have to format and redo the hole thing?

    Sorry I just don't want to read all 20 pages.

    What i'm hoping for is jsut having Linux on my sd card, have it in when I want to boot into it, and take it out to boot into Windows CE if possable. is it?
    Quick resume then (feel free to flame mistakes, add if i forget anything )

    It is not really *one* machine:

    + There are several versions of this machine, that do not appear to differ when looked at from the outside, but that have *some* subtle differences 'inside'. CPU's found so far: VIA-VT8500 and WonderMedia-WM8505; Difference between them are unknow. I've seen only orange boards with 'plug-in' CPU module, but we've also seen reports/fotos of blue boards with the CPU 'fixed' on the board.

    The machine seems hardware-wise capable of running linux:

    + arm CPU/System-On-Chip (SoC): mind you *not* x86-compatible, it will *not* run 'default' pc-binaries, applications *will* need a compile for arm. That *does* rule out most apps that are not available in source.

    + 128 MB RAM: is enough if you don't do 'anything silly'

    + 2Gig 'disk': idem, potential for expansion with sd-cards and USB 'sticks'

    + WiFi: it has an 'embedded' USB-stick: Ralink-2070, in the display unit, hard-wired to one of the USB ports, power on/off by means of a digital output pin of the CPU.

    + keyboard: appears to have a standard PS/2 controller chip

    + video: nothing really special: seems to be supported by the default arm-video-driver. Some snow has been reported when attempting to show something there, but it's also worked 'good' at times. We know the frame-buffer address.

    + sound: too early to tell...

    + USB: idem, the CPU itself has USB-port(s?), so i'd expect 'in-kernel' support for the ARM-USB.

    + LAN: probably not a real problem: looks like the on-board LAN interface of the arm-cpu is used.

    + SD-card: works ok foor booting/bootloader, can't tell yet if it will work with a linux kernel, but this will probably be ok.

    + touchpad: yet unknown...

    + i've done some net-searching of the 'other' chips on my board, and i've been able to find datasheets of about all of them. Painfully lacking however is the datasheet/interface spec of the CPU: VIA (now WonderMedia) is not willing to provide it. I'll return to that 'later'.

    + This machine is based upon a System-On-Chip (SoC). The bad news: the maker is unwilling to give us a datasheet; Good news: he seems to have used a lot of 'from-arm' 'ip-modules' when 'composing' the SoC; Most 'from-arm' modules also appear in other arm-chips, and most of them are supported by the kernel.org kernel. We'll see how much of the 'in-SoC' hardware is auto-detected

    BIOS/bootloader:

    + The bootloader is a 'linux-native' one: u-boot. Mine does support netbooting; Something i value for development work.

    + The bootloader is 'hidden' in the 8-pins 512-KBytes SPI chip that is located near the CPU. It is probably loaded into memory by the CPU chip firmware. That means that it will not be very easy to 'brick' these machines: The bootloader is not in the 'main flash', but at a 'safe location'.

    + The bootloader has a mechanism that supports 'hooking': for software updates, it can -before booing into WinCE- load/burn/start programs from an SD-card. That -in theory- should be enough to allow us to make it boot & run linux from an SD-card, without having to 'destroy' the contents of the 'on-board' 2Gig 'disk'

    + Some of 'us' have already managed to use the above-mentioned mechanism to boot (or should i say: half-boot) a linux kernel that was pre-compiled for a slightly different set of hardware. That kernel got into problems when it attempts to access a hard-disk: there is no such thing on this machine (yet? ).

    Development tools:

    + crosstools as been mentioned: a set of scripts/patches for setting up a compiler for the arm target. NB: i too have a 'home-brew' toolset now. That should allow us to build our own kernels for this machine. Here, however, the lack of clear documentation of the machine's CPU (really an 'all-in-one-chip') might prove troublesome. We know that the CPU is -instructionset-wise- compatible with an ARM-926EJ, but the lack of documentation means we have a bit of 'guess & gamble' work to do to find out how the I/O is 'connected' (inside the CPU chip).

    + i've seen some mention of attempts/ideas to request sources of the GPL-ed software that's inside this machine (u-boot is gpl as far as i know), but no definite results yet.

    Feel free to add/correct, but that's -as far as i know- the 'state of the art' at the moment. We're not there yet, but getting closer

  4. #204
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Beans
    39

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    PrFaas: Brilliant!

    Please post that 3.3v schem, as I'm eager to get this kernel booting properly!

    I'd attach the kernel image that I've build but max upload is ~950K and the bin file is 1.4MB...

    I'll try upload it to anther site and reference soon.

    + sound: too early to tell...
    Via based AC97, I've listed the chip in an earlier post.

    + LAN: probably not a real problem: looks like the on-board LAN interface of the arm-cpu is used.
    Also VIA Rhine based

    + SD-card: works ok foor booting/bootloader, can't tell yet if it will work with a linux kernel, but this will probably be ok.
    I'm confident the Linux kernel will pick it up since there's a direct option to compile in SPI based SD Card readers and other flash based devices via AMBA / SPI access.


    EDIT:

    The latest kernel 2.6.3x has heaps of support directly for the "demo board" SoC as noted in the documentation. Frame buffer integration might take a bit of tweaking but serial console access should be good to go out of the box, since it's unlikely they've changed that from the demo board SoC's to the WM8505...
    Last edited by litch84; January 24th, 2010 at 09:57 AM.

  5. #205
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Haugesund,Norway
    Beans
    35

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    celem

    Online with credit card I bought a KASER at Educational Resources,Illinois,and asked for shipping to Matriark TerVel in Ohio.I got mail,order will be processed asap.
    Nothing hapened,and I called to be sure everything was OK.Had to go through taped interwiew before they asked me to wait - and after several minutes broke the line.A new call to the (obvious nervous) clerck saying "order was in the system" and end of conversation.

    By now no movement on my account ,and no new mail from Educational Resources neither.

    For me it look as if Educational Resourses either will not process the order,or I cannot use my credit card overseas.Or there could be another simpler reason.

  6. #206
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Beans
    15

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    Quote Originally Posted by PerChristensen View Post
    celem

    Online with credit card I bought a KASER at Educational Resources,Illinois,and asked for shipping to Matriark TerVel in Ohio.I got mail,order will be processed asap.
    Nothing hapened,and I called to be sure everything was OK.Had to go through taped interwiew before they asked me to wait - and after several minutes broke the line.A new call to the (obvious nervous) clerck saying "order was in the system" and end of conversation.

    By now no movement on my account ,and no new mail from Educational Resources neither.

    For me it look as if Educational Resourses either will not process the order,or I cannot use my credit card overseas.Or there could be another simpler reason.
    I've never had a problem using my credit card when I've been overseas (although the 3% conversion fee can be painful.) I'm certain such a transaction must seem odd to them, as they're probably not used to processing such orders. That might help explain any nervousness on their part, or perhaps they suspect fraud of some sort. You may have to follow up with them a time or two more. But, there's no need to be alarmed.

    If they won't process the order, that would be discouraging. However, I'm certain there are other retailers that would be willing to do so, assuming of course you're still interested in donating one. Fry's Electronics should carry them, but they don't have them SKU'd on their website.

  7. #207
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Beans
    93

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    Be ready for another long post. the circuit diagram & description of the RS232 buffer; I've also attached the 'meat' as a text-file for in case the forum-software 'mangles' the text all too badly...

    Oh, and before i forget: no warrany, at your own risk and 'the usual' w.r.t. blasting your little computer to 'kingdom come' I've done my best to produce a correct circuit-diagram, but that's all i can promise...


    It is going to be ASCII-'art' for the circuit diagram i'm afraid :-/

    Fortunately, it is a rather basic circuit, so there is even a chance
    that the result will be understandable. The diagrams are all
    going to be 'left-to-right': the pads of the 'mini' computer at the
    left, the pins of the RS232 connector at the right.

    I've attempted to keep the description at about the level of 'my first
    soldering experiment', so all you electronics-tigers please be a little
    patient with my 'baby-steps' in the description

    The basis of the circuit is a simple 74HCT14: a hex schmitt-trigger
    inverter. We'll use only 2 of the 6 inverters in the 'package'. The
    chip is quite basic, and can be gotten in both DIL and smd package.

    The pin-out of the 74HCT14 is as follows:

    Code:
                as seen from the top of the package
    
                      +--v--+
              in1    -|     |- 5.0 volts
              out1   -|     |- in4
              in2    -|     |- out4
              out2   -|     |- in5
              in3    -|     |- out5
              out3   -|     |- in6 
              gnd    -|     |- out6
                      +-----+
    
                 pin-out of the 74HCT14
                 ----------------------
    in1 is the input of the first inverter,
    out1 is the output of the same inverter

    the same applies to in2/out2 etc...

    The transmitter buffer is little more than an inverter with a series-
    resistor in the output line. The resistor is to limit the current from
    the inverter's output in case of short-circuit.

    Code:
          1/6 74HCT14               100
    tx o-------|>o-----------------|||||----------o RS232 RXD (pin 2)
    
    
           transmitter buffer
           ------------------
    The receiver is a little more complicated: the part on the right is to limit the
    input voltage range of the inverter to the 0.0 .. 4.7 Volts range. RS232 *could*
    have voltage levels between -12.0 and +12.0 Volts and that is a bit too much
    for the invterter's input. The diode blocks out the negative voltages, the 10K
    resistor limits the current through the 4.7 Volts zener diode. The Zener diode
    itself limits the positive input voltage of the input of the inverter to below
    the 5.0 Volts supply voltage of the inverter. The 330K resistor ensures that the
    input voltage of the inverter drops to 0.0 Volts if no positive input voltage from
    the RS232 signal is present.

    At the output of the inverter, the 27K/47K resistor divider limits the output
    voltage of the receiver to 3.3 Volts; I found 3.3 Volts at the tx pin of the
    computer and have assumed that i'd better keep the voltage of the signal into the
    rx pin to the same 3.3 Volts. The diode over the 27K resistor is a bit of a late
    addition: i found on the oscilloscope that the output voltage of the receiver
    -when connected to the rx pad- did not drop low enough. I think there is a
    pull-up resistor at the rx pin, and my rather high-impedance output voltage divider
    was unable to pull the rx pin all the way to 0.0 volts. With the extra diode, the
    rx signal is pulled 'low' to about 0.7 Volts. That seems enough to be seen as 'low'
    by the rx input. I would have prefered to use a shottky diode, but i have none in
    the house....

    Code:
                  1N4148
             +------|>|------+
             |     27K       |                 10K     1N4148
    rx o-----+-----|||||-----+-----o<|---+----|||||-----|<|-----o RS232 
             |     47K                   |   4.7V zener           TXD (pin 3)
             +-----|||||-----+           +-----Z|<|-----+
                             |           |     47K      |
                            ---          +----|||||-----+
                            ///                         |
                                                       ---
                                                       ///
    
    
          receiver buffer
          ---------------
    
    legenda:
    
    ------|>|------  = diode
    
    ------|>o------ = inverter
    
    -----|||||----- = resistor
    
    -----|>|Z------  = zener diode, Z-side is the '+' 
    
     |
    ---             = connection to gnd
    ///
    A 74HCT14 has 6 inverters in one package. Two of them are used for this circuit. It
    is advisabe to connect the inputs of the 4 remaining inverters to either the 5.0 Volts,
    or to gnd (makes little difference which one, just so long at they are not kept
    'floating'/unconnected).

    The supply voltage of the 74HCT14 can be 'taken' from the gnd/5V pads of the computer
    board. I have not yet tried that myself, but this circuit is vert low-power, so i expect
    few problems there.

    Remains a few connections of the RS232 connector to make things really work: RS232 has a
    few 'control lines' that can be used to 'start/stop' the transmission. Since we have no
    equivalent I/O at the computer board, i've interconnected them in such a way that a device
    connected at the RS232 port always gets a 'permission to send' at all times. another thing
    is that we will have to connect the RS232 GND signal to 'our' gnd signal:
    My circuit ends in a 9 'pins' female sub-D mini connector; You'd usually
    find the equivalent 'male' counterpart used as an RS232 connector at the
    back of a computer.

    Code:
    RS232 sub-D mini 9-pins female connector pins:
    
               5 4 3 2 1
             -------------
             \ o o o o o /    as seen when looking 
              \ o o o o /     into the 'holes' of 
               --------       the connector
                9 8 7 6
    
    
               1 2 3 4 5
             -------------
             \ o o o o o /    as seen when looking 
              \ o o o o /     at the back (cable side)
               --------       of the connector
                6 7 8 9
    
    pins descriptions:
    
    pin 1 = control signal (DCD), connect to pins 7 and 8
    pin 2 = RS232 RXD <-- transmitter circuit output
    pin 3 = RS232 TXD --> receiver circuit input
    pin 4 = control signal (DTR), connect to pin 6
    pin 5 = connect to gnd
    pin 6 = control signal (DSR), see pin 4
    pin 7 = control signal (RTS), see pin 1
    pin 8 = control signal (CTS), see pin 1
    pin 9 = control signal (RI), not used
    
    
    In ASCII-'art':
    
    
       +----o RS232 pin 5
       |
      ---
      ///
    
       +----o RS232 pin 4
       |
       +----o RS232 pin 6
    
       +----o RS232 pin 1
       |
       +----o RS232 pin 7
       |
       +----o RS232 pin 8
    
        additional connections at the RS232 sub-D mini 9 connector
        ----------------------------------------------------------
    I hope that this is enough info to duplicate the circuit... ASCII-'art' is not
    the best graphics tool, and if anyone finds the time to make a nice 'png'/'gif'
    or whatever of this, i'd be most gratefull I did try out a few graphics
    programs for 'the same', but found that this was the fastest way for me to get
    a description of the circuit. Now, i just hope i've not made too many mistakes

    NB: i use 'minicom' running on a Linux machine as the 'other end' of the
    communications link.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by PrFaas; January 28th, 2010 at 06:30 AM. Reason: typo's, what else... / 330K --> 47K

  8. #208
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Haugesund,Norway
    Beans
    35

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    I will give them a call at Educational and cancel the order if not heard anything from them in next 3-4 days

  9. #209
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Beans
    7

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    PrFaas,
    I'm sure if this fits within your summary or not, but here are some details of my different machine.

    I think it is a Lan Yu LY-EB01

    Same case as the others, but different processor and motherboard.

    Processor is soldered to the motherboard. The 802.11 wireless nic is a daughter board. It seems the computer can be delivered with other forms of wireless (3G), hence the easily replaceable nic.

    System properties (reported by Windows CE)
    System:
    Microsoft?Windows?CE
    Version 5.00 (Build 1400)

    Computer
    Processor Type: AKARM, ARM926-AKCHIP
    Expansion Slots:
    Memory 128M

    ----

    System Specs:
    Processor: ANYKA AK7802TQ21605
    NAND Flash: K9GAG08U0D (2GB)
    Ethernet Controller: Davicom DM9008AEP
    Wireless NIC: Prolink RT2070L (Realtek RT2870 clone?)


    Number on Motherboard: ZT_NT670_V88_FPC_1018

    I've attached two pictures of the motherboard
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #210
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    UK
    Beans
    6

    Re: Linux on 7" mini netbook ARM-VT8500 ?

    tlk23 - that board looks the same as mine, which I beleive is similar to the one in the 'CMN Book'.

    Just had a look on the Anyka site (was down the other week) and I beleive this board is this:
    http://www.anyka.com/enProShow.asp?i...t&sortFlag=113

    Perhaps we could request more details on the specific board?
    Last edited by sleeky24; January 24th, 2010 at 05:57 PM.

Page 21 of 124 FirstFirst ... 1119202122233171121 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •