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Thread: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

  1. #91
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    Re: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

    My favourite applications\


    For maple 12 users it is very important to get this file
    http://www.mediafire.com/file/tryjzw4yhzm/AEM Maple 12 +Solution Manual.rar

    google name to find abt this valuable thing
    unpaack this in maple installation directory or anywhere else!!
    run Table of contents *.mws file from within maple
    one folder consists of book & the other the solution manual
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by cariboo; April 27th, 2010 at 05:27 AM. Reason: Remove huge inline images and replace with thumbnail
    'God is not a dead equation!' Allama Iqbal

    http://www.mediafire.com/byusama

  2. #92
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    Re: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

    @ pakki

    Dude, have you ever heard about thumbnails?!? Your screen captures are huge. I don't have a problem with it (I'm on a 7.5MBit cable modem connection), but I'm pretty sure there's a forum rule about not posting images that big!

    Anyway, back to the topic, which is "the sorry state of engineer apps on Linux".

    I've been using AutoCAD/Solidworks/Solid Edge in my field of work, and have hoped for Linux alternatives for years. I'm keeping pretty much up to date about this. Here's what I know about MCAD apps on Linux:

    Commercial (high-end) parametric MCAD packages:
    • Pro|Engineer Wildfire 3 from 2007 was the last Linux release from PTC, which claimed there was not enough demand to continue offering it. It was certified for Red Hat 32-bit.
    • Siemens PLM Software (formerly UGS) NX is currently the only available parametric CAD app on Linux. It is the result of combining Unigraphics, which was first developed on UNIX 30 years ago, with SDRC I-DEAS. NX is used in the automotive and aeronautics industries. NX4 to NX6 (the latter published in 2008 ) are available on Linux, certified for SuSE 64-bit (and on OS X and Solaris too I believe). The latest NX7 release from 2009 is currently only available on Windows, I don't know if a Linux release will be available.
    • Catia V5 is not available on Linux, but many people claim they can run it through Wine. (see WineHQ's AppDB entry)
    • No other Windows parametric MCAD app will run with Wine: that's Solidworks, Solid Edge, Inventor or Pro|Engineer. They just use too much of Microsoft's .NET framework and APIs for that to happen anytime soon.
    • Solidworks may actually run on Linux, when it turns to the cloud in the next few years. Then the main app would run on a Windows server, and there would be a client app on (possibly) any platform. At SolidWorks World 2010, a demo showed such a client running on a Mac.


    AutoCAD alternatives
    • Bricscad by Bricsys, an Autocad clone that has been available on Windows for 10 years, is being ported to Linux. Currently at alpha stage, final version to be available during 2010; a standard (2D) and Pro version (ACIS modeling) should be offered.
    • ARES and ARES Commander Edition are new Autocad LT/Autocad clones developed by Graebert, the Linux versions also to be made available during 2010.


    Other lesser known commercial packages:
    • GraphiteOne is at v3.1 and based on the Parasolid kernel. Its interface is now close to Solidworks (without all the features or the same ease of use). There was a free personal version (part design only) available in Ubuntu package. As of now, the website has been down ("under construction" it says) for some time. No idea what's going on.
    • VariCAD has already been mentioned: it works in 2D/3D. Its UI is not easy to grasp.
    • MEDUSA4 from CAD-Schroer has a free version: it's an odd 2D/3D hybrid modeling app. You draw on ortho views, the software generates a 3D model from it. The drafting module's UI is one of the best I've seen on Linux. Problems with the free version: you need a license locked to your PC's MAC address, it has to be renewed every 6 months. And you can't save in any other format than their proprietary one. Their website offers a service to export to DWG or PDF, for a fee.


    The odd one
    • Google Sketchup 7.1 for Windows now runs surprisingly well on Linux with Wine, even on some Intel graphics. (tested on PCs with nVidia GF6200GT, GF8600GTS and GF9800GT; and on a mini-notebook with Intel GMA 4500MHD)

    Open Source Projects of note:
    • QCad Community Edition for 2D drafting, frustrating to use for any AutoCAD user (the snaps you need to set manually, only one active at a time, is the main source of frustration)
    • PythonCAD, after being left for dead for a couple years, was picked up by a new maintainer last year. This 2D CAD app has a simplistic but straightforward UI, automatic snap tools (a plus against QCad), but it lacks features, is slow and ATM can't open or save DXF. There's a release planned for next August that may address that.
    • FreeCAD is a promising 3D parametric package aiming to offer a tool set similar to commercial parametric apps, but it may take years for that to happen; still, it's a fun app to play with, and is already available in Lucid Lynx's repositories.
    • HeeksCAD is a comparable project to FreeCAD, I haven't had the chance to try it yet but it too is very interesting. Both are based on OpenCascade.
    • gCAD3D is another project which is currently active.


    By the way, don't expect any open source CAD software to be "compatible" to Solidworks, Inventor and the like. All they can import are open, non-proprietary and fully spec'd formats like STEP and IGES, and possibly DXF.

    That's it for now.
    Last edited by Gemnoc; April 26th, 2010 at 08:49 AM.

  3. #93
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    Re: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

    To the OpenSource CAD apps you could add avoCADo (http://avocado-cad.sourceforge.net/). It looks very well planned and organised, but there was only ever one main developer and it looks like they've burnt out a bit. The last commit to the source code was 17 months ago.

    The feature set is very basic at the moment but the potential is definitely there.

    FreeCAD and HeeksCAD both use the OpenCASCADE library, where as avoCADo is starting from scratch and writing it's own backend.

    AvoCADo is written in Java which I thought was a bit of a weird choice for a CAD app, but if there are any Java developers out there looking for something to contribute to this might be a really good option.

  4. #94
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    Re: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

    Quote Originally Posted by ad_267 View Post
    To the OpenSource CAD apps you could add avoCADo (http://avocado-cad.sourceforge.net/). It looks very well planned and organised, but there was only ever one main developer and it looks like they've burnt out a bit. The last commit to the source code was 17 months ago.
    You're right, and I didn't mention it because it's been inactive for so long. One other 2D app I forgot is CADEMIA, which is also programmed in Java. A new v2 release should be out soon.

    Maybe I could add those two to my list.

    Quote Originally Posted by ad_267
    FreeCAD and HeeksCAD both use the OpenCASCADE library, where as avoCADo is starting from scratch and writing it's own backend.
    That's because 3D apps need a geometric kernel. OpenCASCADE offers this kernel as well as a development platform. Well known comercial kernels are ACIS, Parasolid, Granite (Pro|E), Catia's. To my knowledge, OpenCASCADE's is the only open source geometric kernel. But FreeCAD and HeeksCAD still needed to develop their 2D drafting modules, as I understand it.

    I just remembered another app: OpenSCAD: it's labeled "the programmer's solid 3D CAD modeler". 3D models are generated by scripting.
    Last edited by Gemnoc; April 26th, 2010 at 07:57 PM. Reason: typo!

  5. #95
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    Re: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

    Yeah FreeCAD and HeeksCAD look to be better options than avoCADo, I just hadn't seen avoCADo before and it looked like it had some potential if someone wanted to take it over.

    It seems like there's some licensing issues with Open CASCADE. Debian used to include it in the non-free repository but recently moved it into main, however Fedora still considers it to be non-free and won't include it in their repos. Hopefully that gets sorted out but from what I've read the Open CASCADE people haven't been at all helpful in trying to resolve this: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=458974.

  6. #96
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    Re: Linux (Ubuntu) for engineers...

    Hey ad_267,

    Thanks for bringing this to my attention. I didn't know about that OCC licensing problem. I wonder what was done for FreeCAD to be finally included in Debian and Ubuntu repositories (the HeeksCAD project hasn't had such luck).

    I found a thread in the OpenCascade forums discussing it further. I know licensing issues are very important, but reading the whole thread and trying to understand all the specifics almost gave me a headache!

    As for avoCADo, I wouldn't go as far as say it's not as good an option as FreeCAD and HeeksCAD. It just doesn't have the same goal. I think a good 2D CAD app will always be useful.

    Regards

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