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Thread: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Wink new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    I have just installed ubuntu yesterday and I realized that gcc was not working on the terminal shell.

    I am used to red hat linux and didn't really understand the idea of repositories.

    Also I don't have a network connection to that computer.

    Can someone show me how to install gcc ( and also g++, gcj etc..) ?

    Thank you all !!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    63

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    Hi,
    Ubuntu does not install gcc by default. So pop in the installation cd in your drive, open up a terminal, and type the following:

    Code:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    That should give you a basic gcc install. You do not need an internet connection for that.

    -J-

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    3

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    Quote Originally Posted by benguin
    Hi,
    Ubuntu does not install gcc by default. So pop in the installation cd in your drive, open up a terminal, and type the following:

    Code:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    That should give you a basic gcc install. You do not need an internet connection for that.

    -J-
    Thank you benguin!

    By the way can you provide me a list of apps embedded in the 'build-essential' package ?

    Or if you can,
    would you please show me a list of all apps available in the cd, BUT not installed automatically?
    Last edited by josif; January 21st, 2006 at 08:58 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    83

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    http://packages.ubuntu.com/breezy/devel/build-essential is a list of everything available in build-essential

    For your second question, all I could think of would be opening up Synaptic and browsing through the packages (assuming the CD is your only repo in sources.list, only packages on the CD should be there)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    3

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    Quote Originally Posted by SSTwinrova
    http://packages.ubuntu.com/breezy/devel/build-essential is a list of everything available in build-essential

    For your second question, all I could think of would be opening up Synaptic and browsing through the packages (assuming the CD is your only repo in sources.list, only packages on the CD should be there)
    this problem is solved and gcc is working ok.

    but when trying to compile some programs it gave me strange errors :
    some basic libraries couldn't be found. so it complained about not finding glib-config, libpng, etc.

    I tried to learn something about this problems from the net and I realized that
    the problem can be because the *-dev versions of the libraries aren't found.
    one solution was to edit the repositories in synaptic from "main restricted" to
    "main restricted universe multiverse", but in my ubuntu cd no universe or multiverse directories is found under dist directory.

    I have to add that I don't have network connection on my pc.

    where can I find a CD iso (or whatever) containing universe and multiverse directories? to conclude I wellcome every suggestion ...

    thank you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    2

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    Quote Originally Posted by benguin View Post
    Hi,
    Ubuntu does not install gcc by default. So pop in the installation cd in your drive, open up a terminal, and type the following:

    Code:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    That should give you a basic gcc install. You do not need an internet connection for that.

    -J-
    I had my installation CD on the drive, tried the command, but throws "unable to find build-essential.."


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    45

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    Quote Originally Posted by ivanceras View Post
    I had my installation CD on the drive, tried the command, but throws "unable to find build-essential.."

    try this:
    sudo aptitude install build-essential

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    45

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    by the way, whats the difference between:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    and
    sudo aptitude install build-essential ?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    410
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: new to ubuntu :: gcc not installed

    Quote Originally Posted by plastichero View Post
    by the way, whats the difference between:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    and
    sudo aptitude install build-essential ?
    It used to be that aptitude would keep track of dependencies, making your life easier if you wanted to uninstall things, where apt-get would not.

    For example, if you wanted to install program x, but program x depends on program y, both apt-get and aptitude would do the same thing. Both of them would download program x, notice that it depends on program y, then download and install program y before installing program x.

    Now, it used to be, that apt- get would not keep track of this. For example, if you wanted to uninstall program x, you would naturally want to uninstall program y as well (that is, if nothing else depended on it).

    If you used sudo apt-get remove x, it would only remove x, and not y.

    Where sudo aptitude remove x would remove x and y.

    HOWEVER, this is not the case any more. apt-get can keep track of orphaned packages. For example, if you were to type sudo apt-get remove x, and look at the output, it would show you that program x is being removed, but also warn you that program y is an orphan (no other programs depend on it). So, if you type sudo apt-get autoremove, it will remove any orphaned packages.

    Currently, I do not think there is any difference between aptitude and apt-get for installing / uninstalling. Of course aptitude can do many, many other things that apt-get can't do. Which is why they have other apt-... programs such as apt-source etc etc.

    Any aptitude / apt-get experts want to clarify further if I missed anything?

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