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View Full Version : Does Vidalia (Tor/Privoxy) insure anonymity in P2P network?



handy
November 27th, 2008, 02:08 AM
I don't like being tracked my Big Brother or the Marketroids.

So I always have Vidalia running & have an ever growing & already huge list of sites who's cookies are always blocked, with a very small list of sites where their cookies are allowed, obviously due to my having Firefox ask me every time a cookie wants to stuff itself onto my machine.

So as the thread title says, does Vidalia (Tor/Privoxy) insure or at least help to prevent the location of my genuine IP & in effect my physical location on the planet when participating in P2P networking via torrents?

Is there a method/software that does truly make me invisible on the net?

I am using NAT modem/router for all it is worth.

Thanks for your time.

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 02:25 AM
I don't like being tracked my Big Brother or the Marketroids.

So I always have Vidalia running & have an ever growing & already huge list of sites who's cookies are always blocked, with a very small list of sites where their cookies are allowed, obviously due to my having Firefox ask me every time a cookie wants to stuff itself onto my machine.

So as the thread title says, does Vidalia (Tor/Privoxy) insure or at least help to prevent the location of my genuine IP & in effect my physical location on the planet when participating in P2P networking via torrents?

Is there a method/software that does truly make me invisible on the net?

I am using NAT modem/router for all it is worth.

Thanks for your time.

i sincerely hope you don't abuse tor like that. it's not built to handle p2p, let alone torrents. even if... you manage to make connections, you'll be downloading at 4Kbs~.

easy solution: if you want to be unjustifiably paranoid for no reason, don't download illegal p2p content and ruin the tor network for everyone else.

and no, your ip can still be obtained. tor is only "close" to being totally anonymous while using a web browser with scripting turned off. the only -real- anonymous way to use the internet is through an unregistered modem.

x0as
November 27th, 2008, 02:26 AM
Don't use Tor for torrents, the network is already slow with people abusing it to download warez.

handy
November 27th, 2008, 02:33 AM
It looks like I had better change the hat of my avatar before I'm hung from the yard arm!

Thanks for your positive input! :lolflag:

My question is about P2P security, so if anyone does actually know something on the subject I would dearly like to hear from them?

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 02:38 AM
It looks like I had better change the hat of my avatar before I'm hung from the yard arm!

Thanks for your positive input! :lolflag:

My question is about P2P security, so if anyone does actually know something on the subject I would dearly like to hear from them?

you don't need P2P security if you aren't breaking the law. just sounds like you want a way to download shady content without the risk of being caught.

i don't think the ubuntu forums are going to assist you in the matter IMO.

x0as
November 27th, 2008, 02:38 AM
Easy solution is don't use torrents, there's safer options like forums & newsgroups, only the server owners can see your ip unlike bt where everybody in the swarm including the riaa/mpaa can see your ip & what you're downloading.

I don't care what you download, as long as it's not through tor.

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 02:42 AM
Easy solution is don't use torrents, there's safer options like forums & newsgroups, only the server owners can see your ip unlike bt where everybody in the swarm including the riaa/mpaa can see your ip & what you're downloading.

I don't care what you download, as long as it's not through tor.

they have been known to hand over plenty of ip's in the past.

x0as
November 27th, 2008, 02:45 AM
they have been known to hand over plenty of ip's in the past.

Which of the big upload sites (rapidshare, megaupload) or newgroup servers have handed over logs of what somebodies download?

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 02:47 AM
Which of the big upload sites (rapidshare, megaupload) or newgroup servers have handed over logs of what somebodies download?

ah i didn't see that you said forums as well. i was speaking for newsgroups.

handy
November 27th, 2008, 02:56 AM
I download distro's for my testing machine usually via torrent, I don't know what the eye's of various governments, especially those in the U.S. are looking at, I have the impression that there are BIG money groups that have been trying to find a way to shut down P2P. I expect that there is a good deal of surveillance constantly in progress when it comes to P2P.

Does anyone have any links to details on this subject?

x0as
November 27th, 2008, 03:09 AM
p2p isn't illegal, it's only the content shared that can causes legal problems. If you're only downloading linux/bsd distros that's 100% legal.

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 03:14 AM
I download distro's for my testing machine usually via torrent, I don't know what the eye's of various governments, especially those in the U.S. are looking at, I have the impression that there are BIG money groups that have been trying to find a way to shut down P2P. I expect that there is a good deal of surveillance constantly in progress when it comes to P2P.

Does anyone have any links to details on this subject?

reading your signature links, it makes more sense now. -_-

there's no big money in taking down p2p. (where do you hear this crap?) it's been around 10+ years now, in so many incarnations. it's not going to happen.

the US government is NOT using resources to infiltrate linux torrent trackers and seek out peoples personal data. like... just repeat that to yourself and tell me it doesn't sound crazy.

the only "surveillance" that goes on in p2p is the RIAA and MPAA. and all they do is upload fake files for others to download, then try to take a VERY small amount of them to court.

not to burst your conspiracy theory bubble here, but all of that nonsense unfortunately does not take place in the p2p community as you may think.

handy
November 27th, 2008, 05:26 AM
reading your signature links, it makes more sense now. -_-

there's no big money in taking down p2p. (where do you hear this crap?) it's been around 10+ years now, in so many incarnations. it's not going to happen.

The RIAA & MPIA want P2P stopped. Those organisations represent the mega media corporations who are struggling to hold onto the old ways & their perceived control. There are senators in the U.S. that say that P2P is a national security threat, I wonder who is funding them?



the US government is NOT using resources to infiltrate linux torrent trackers and seek out peoples personal data. like... just repeat that to yourself and tell me it doesn't sound crazy.

Who do you think runs the U.S. government, the people! :lolflag:

Big money runs that government & as true as it is, that is unfortunately crazy.



the only "surveillance" that goes on in p2p is the RIAA and MPAA. and all they do is upload fake files for others to download, then try to take a VERY small amount of them to court.

How do they track the files?



not to burst your conspiracy theory bubble here, but all of that nonsense unfortunately does not take place in the p2p community as you may think.

So you say.

x0as
November 27th, 2008, 05:39 AM
The RIAA & MPIA want P2P stopped.

They want to stop copyrighted files being shared, P2P isn't illegal.


How do they track the files?

Your ip is visible to everybody connected to the torrent, all they need to do is connect to the torrent & note every other ip connected.

Skripka
November 27th, 2008, 05:42 AM
They want to stop copyrighted files being shared, P2P isn't illegal.




Of the 2 tt is MUCH easier to do the later, and in the process you stop the former along the way.

Net Neutrality anyone?

x0as
November 27th, 2008, 05:44 AM
Of the 2 tt is MUCH easier to do the later, and in the process you stop the former along the way.


In that case they'll have to make http, ftp & irc illegal as well.

Skripka
November 27th, 2008, 05:45 AM
In that case they'll have to make http, ftp & irc illegal as well.

Give them time, give them time.

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 06:58 AM
Give them time, give them time.

what are they going to do? they can't start deep packet inspecting everyone to see what type of traffic is being moved.

grazed
November 27th, 2008, 07:05 AM
How do they track the files?


i'm not going to get into how i think you've worn one tinfoil hat too many...:roll:, but i will indulge you with your question.

the MPAA and RIAA seed fake torrents. just.. a large blank volume file, usually only on their own hosted sites... and get dumb people to download them. they pick up their ip's and have at it. note that this... rarely, if ever actually lands someone in court, let alone even a letter from your isp.

secondly, they'll do the same for the major p2p networks with false file names. you'll see a song, and have it obviously not be the right file size (something like 310Kb), they just see who's connecting to them in limewire, kazaa, and the such, and again get their ip and go from there.

EDIT: just for clarification, the only fake torrents and files they use, are named after copyrighted material, not legal content such as linux distros.

they could care less about linux distros. they have no reason to even bother.

handy
November 27th, 2008, 09:22 AM
i'm not going to get into how i think you've worn one tinfoil hat too many...:roll:, but i will indulge you with your question.

Sadly, you have no idea... :lolflag:

handy
November 27th, 2008, 09:26 AM
what are they going to do? they can't start deep packet inspecting everyone to see what type of traffic is being moved.

You haven't heard that internet2 is in the process of replacing internet1, & that if they have their way the internet as we know it will be replaced by a very limited & expensive substitute?

That is why the Oz government is in the process of trying to install an internet censorship system that is more limited than those currently in the Middle East or China.

frankleeee
November 27th, 2008, 09:33 AM
It looks like I had better change the hat of my avatar before I'm hung from the yard arm!

Thanks for your positive input! :lolflag:

My question is about P2P security, so if anyone does actually know something on the subject I would dearly like to hear from them?

I noticed the lack of coverage, but I didn't want to bother you with it. ;)

handy
November 27th, 2008, 10:47 PM
I noticed the lack of coverage, but I didn't want to bother you with it. ;)

My heads getting cold now. ;-)