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View Full Version : Samsung NC10 Netbook - EPIC WIN?



Kernel Sanders
November 26th, 2008, 01:40 AM
**Samsung NC10** (http://www.samsung.com/uk/consumer/detail/features.do?group=itbusiness&type=notebookcomputers&subtype=nseries&model_cd=NC10RH/XEU)

I have never owned a netbook before, and until now never wanted one, but I am really really tempted by one of these! Has rave reviews also. The battery life is reported to be over 7 hours! :eek:

My only problem is that i'm obsessive compulsive. That is, whenever I get a new computer I must instantly wipe away the OEM soul sucking default install of DOOM, and replace it with my own OS and software.

This seems that it could be a bit of a problem with a netbook becuase it won't have an optical drive?

Is the solution to that as easy as using a USB optical drive? Or do I have to get used to setting up XP and Ubuntu to install from USB flash drives?

Also, does anyone have/want one of these? What are your thoughts on this fine specimen? 8)

Vadi
November 26th, 2008, 01:46 AM
Netbooks suck and I'm still waiting for my MID with a Ubuntu MID Edition pre-loaded on it with support.

Capt. Mac
November 26th, 2008, 01:49 AM
Genuine Microsoft Windows® XP Home

They lost me here.

It looks pretty though :)

handy
November 26th, 2008, 01:59 AM
I'd hold out until USB 3.0 is released, as it will quickly become the standard & will certainly give netbooks the connection speed to peripherals that they need being 10 times faster than USB 2.

Grant A.
November 26th, 2008, 01:59 AM
Netbooks suck and I'm still waiting for my MID with a Ubuntu MID Edition pre-loaded on it with support.

+1

I have no use for a netbook, they are gigantic cell phones.

gn2
November 26th, 2008, 08:34 AM
Is the solution to that as easy as using a USB optical drive? Or do I have to get used to setting up XP and Ubuntu to install from USB flash drives?

You can install from a live USB flash drive which is now very easy to create with the new tool incorporated into Ubuntu 8.10.

Flash drives are massively cheaper smaller and lighter than USB optical drives.

Something to watch out for if considering netbook purchase is the graphics adapter, the newer 5xx series Atom CPU's are twinned with the Intel GMA 500 chipset that doesn't have a Linux driver yet.

grazed
November 26th, 2008, 09:14 AM
well for me, they're just as inconvenient to lug around as a 15 inch notebook. i'll be carrying around a bag either way. i don't mind if it weighs a bit more.

but the major deal breaker with these netbooks for me is the crazy weak/poor multi-tasking atom processors. =/

i'm not sure of the technicalities of it all, but is an atom cpu really able to save -that- much more power than a scaling single core celeron or turion?

gn2
November 26th, 2008, 11:02 AM
i'm not sure of the technicalities of it all, but is an atom cpu really able to save -that- more power than a scaling single core celeron or turion?

Yes.
The TDP of the lowest Celeron ULV Mobile CPU is 5w but typically modern Celeron mobile CPU's have a TDP of 27-35w.
The TDP of the Atom fitted in netbooks is 2.4w

Ub1476
November 26th, 2008, 12:04 PM
If you just want I would probably wait for Ubuntu ARM based netbooks coming June - 2008. If you need it now, USB works fine.

jeyaganesh
November 26th, 2008, 01:20 PM
People are just exaggerating with netbooks. Buy a proper laptop.

Jon Bradbury
November 26th, 2008, 02:02 PM
NC10 works for me.

I have it dual booting XP & Intrepid, but of course there are some hardware problems (mostly related to the function keys), but this is completely normal I think for any laptop.

It is quite responsive and is easily able to run Compiz with effects (including Cube). Obviously I don't use it for ripping DVDs or playing modern 3D first person shoot 'em ups, but it is light, has (as you say) a good battery life and is easy to lug about.

I won't get into the whole "netbook = phone != laptop" debate because it is fairly pointless. It's a matter of making a pragmatic choice for what you intend to use the device for. If you want to understand the current stae of play WRT putting Ubuntu on the NC10, this is a good resource : http://nc10ubuntu.wordpress.com/

Cheers

JonB

Paqman
November 26th, 2008, 02:26 PM
Is the solution to that as easy as using a USB optical drive? Or do I have to get used to setting up XP and Ubuntu to install from USB flash drives?


Either a flash drive or USB optical.

Don't waste money on a full-on usb optical drive if you're only using it when you install. Buy a cheap IDE drive caddy (about £10 in the UK, as opposed to £40-200 for a USB optical drive). They work just as well for IDE optical drives as they do for IDE hard drives. Just unplug the drive from your current machine and use it in the caddy to do the install.

gn2
November 26th, 2008, 05:18 PM
People are just exaggerating with netbooks. Buy a proper laptop.

You need very big coat pockets to fit a standard laptop in them, a netbook will be much more portable.

Portability is what netbooks are all about, not computing performance.

Don't need portability? You don't need a netbook.

nonperson
November 27th, 2008, 10:41 PM
I have a NC10 now for two weeks. I still have reservations about screen size. BUT it is so portable, so much more portable than a 12" laptop. I keep mine in a messenger bag designed for 17" laptops; it easily swallows netbook, PSU, and mouse. (Yes I take the latter two items everywhere too!)
I take it book hunting down the further and remotest of the univeristy's library shelves. Never looses network connection despite all the metal bookshelves and the building's less than wonderful wi-fi.

What has impressed me so far is the qualtiy of the standard Intel graphics which outstrips my faithful three year old tower's performance. Not as good as the Nvidia card in my Vostro at moving the cube but not far off. And the VGA out gives a wonderful bright picture on my Samsung 24" monitor and Sony 32" TV.

The keyboard is super as well.

Confession: I wasn't going to dual boot at first....

Mr. Picklesworth
November 27th, 2008, 10:56 PM
This is a VERY nice looking computer. I for one am completely happy with Debian and Maemo on my Nokia N810 tablet (which is pocket sized), but I was almost drawn to it. I'm not keen on encouraging those Windows XP pre-installs, though. It's about time for that OS to die...

hscottyh
November 29th, 2008, 08:10 PM
I've had one of these for a couple of days and I love it!

jomiolto
November 29th, 2008, 08:36 PM
Why is this better than most other netbooks? Perhaps I missed something, but all the features seem similar to those of other netbooks (Atom, 10" screen, just over 1kg, etc.).

Also, no Linux version? That is a deal breaker for me ;)

smartboyathome
November 29th, 2008, 09:09 PM
This seems perfect for me (keyboard was the only downside to the EEE for me)! If only a company around here carried it. :(

BTW, I would probably just sell Windows back to Samsung and install Linux.

Auraomega
December 1st, 2008, 04:19 AM
Why is this better than most other netbooks? Perhaps I missed something, but all the features seem similar to those of other netbooks (Atom, 10" screen, just over 1kg, etc.).

Most, if not all Netbooks are the same spec with only very minor changes. I have seen Ubuntu running on one of these nicely, has some issues but then its rare to come across any install that doesn't have one niggly problem.

As has been said though, a netbook is for portability, not for playing Fallout 3. I'm personally getting a netbook to put in my hiking bag when I on my next mountain climb, so I need something small to fit into my bag and not take up space for other things, and being light is a definate need because those rucksacks can weight around 20KG!

You could check out Pen Drive Linux (http://www.pendrivelinux.com/) for guides on installing previous versions as well (incase you dislike 8.10 for whatever reason).

-Aura

flaak_monkey
December 1st, 2008, 05:48 AM
i just bought a MSI Wind and have Ubuntu on it and it works like a champ.

sloggerkhan
December 1st, 2008, 05:54 AM
love my netbook, but setting it up is a pita, they need loads of tweaks and optimizations.

That said, installing via USB is really easy, at least for linux. There a usb netboot iso utility in the repos that will let you use any live cd with your usb key.

jomiolto
December 1st, 2008, 07:22 AM
Most, if not all Netbooks are the same spec with only very minor changes. I have seen Ubuntu running on one of these nicely, has some issues but then its rare to come across any install that doesn't have one niggly problem.

As has been said though, a netbook is for portability, not for playing Fallout 3. I'm personally getting a netbook to put in my hiking bag when I on my next mountain climb, so I need something small to fit into my bag and not take up space for other things, and being light is a definate need because those rucksacks can weight around 20KG!

I was actually referring to the title and some of the posts, which give the impression that this is the best thing since sliced bread -- I'm only curious to know why, since I can't see any reason why this would be so much better than one of the other netbooks.

When it comes to netbooks, I've actually been looking for one myself, since my regular 15.4" notebook is just too big and heavy to be taken everywhere (and also breaks too easily). The performance is definitely not an issue for me, since 1GB of memory and an Atom processor is enough for 99% of the things I do (and the remaining 1% isn't anything important ;) ).

bigbrovar
December 1st, 2008, 11:01 AM
i have got the dell m1330 its very light and small plus its got 320gb of 7200RPM hard-drive plus 4gb ram .. yeah i know its not netbook small but that is where my Nokia N810 plus 10gb storage comes in (8gb external memory card. 2gb internal) .. I Definitely dont need a netbook.

speedwell68
December 1st, 2008, 11:38 AM
I got the wife an Acer Aspire One at the weekend. It came with Linpus Lite pre-installed, which frankly sucked. So I installed Ubuntu 8.04 Netbook Remix, it works a treat, all hardware is supported out of the box. I followed these instructions, using the USB Image writer method...

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UNR#UNR%20Image%20Installation

Auraomega
December 1st, 2008, 01:17 PM
I'm only curious to know why, since I can't see any reason why this would be so much better than one of the other netbooks.

After looking at all the available netbooks in the UK this one has the best in terms of weight and size, keyboard layout (94% true sized), battery life which ranges from over 5 hours at full use to almost 8 hours on low usage (imagine underclocking this thing), its share graphics is 128mb, the EEEPc has 8mb, or at least did on the one I got (which sucked may I add). Its also got the biggest storage at 160GB. The price is low for what you are getting when you look at the equivalent Acer, Asus, and MSI, and Samsung is a well trusted brand too.


-Aura

jaseanton
December 7th, 2008, 10:50 AM
Samsung NC10: epic win? Yep.

I have the Dell XPS m1330 and the NC10. The Dell seems like a brick now. Currently, the NC10 is widely thought to be the best netbook on the market. I couldn't do without mine now and highly recommended it.

UbuWu
December 7th, 2008, 07:02 PM
It is almost perfect. Now if they only would offer one with 3G builtin, I would buy it directly.

notwen
December 7th, 2008, 07:57 PM
This seems that it could be a bit of a problem with a netbook becuase it won't have an optical drive?

Is the solution to that as easy as using a USB optical drive? Or do I have to get used to setting up XP and Ubuntu to install from USB flash drives?

Also, does anyone have/want one of these? What are your thoughts on this fine specimen? 8)

Unetbootin (http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/) will install Ubuntu or any other Linux distro from USB for you easily enough. XP on the other hand may prove to be a bti difficult w/o a external CD-ROM drive. It can however be done, see my post here (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=978624). There were very few sources I could find other than what I linked to in my thread. Lemme know if you need any help. =]

As far as the netbook itself goes, it definitely looks good. I like how they managed to use the majority of the space to prevent the keyboard being shrunk down too much. The single rocker bar instead of two separated buttons for the touch pad irks me, but it beats having them on the right/left side like Acer's Aspire One. Other than that it has similar specs to all the other netbooks. Not a bad addition to the already crowded netbook family.

Be sure to post back if you do decide to get it and let us know how it all turns out. =]

cardinals_fan
December 7th, 2008, 08:48 PM
That actually looks nice.

jaseanton
December 8th, 2008, 01:13 AM
I like how they managed to use the majority of the space to prevent the keyboard being shrunk down too much. The single rocker bar instead of two separated buttons for the touch pad irks me


They keyboard is very good - takes a bit of getting used to, though. I touch type, so the smaller keyboards on some of the netbooks was a no-no. BTW, the black model has two dark blue keys: F7 & F8. This seems to have caused some confusion with owners. It is standard - Samsung claims that it's because these keys perform functions not seen on other machines - and you hardly notice it.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3188/3090467597_093b6f9c7a.jpg

The rocker bar is actually pretty usable and bends at either end for double-clicking. The thing that does take some getting used to is the trackpad. By touch alone, it's hard to tell when you are on the pad, so sometimes you find yourself having to do a double-take to make sure you're actually using the thing, especially with scrolling. But I'm sure I'll get used to it.

Here's a comparison shot of the XPS M1330 (13.3" screen) and the NC10:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3269/3090476681_5ef9434836.jpg

Mark76
December 9th, 2008, 03:23 PM
If you just want I would probably wait for Ubuntu ARM based netbooks coming June - 2008. If you need it now, USB works fine.

You mean we'll have to travel back in time to buy them? :confused: