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View Full Version : Who uses OpenDNS? What is it for?



Athanasius
November 25th, 2008, 02:37 AM
Somebody tossed a link my way http://www.opendns.com/. Can somebody explain, in layman's terms, what it is for? One thing I want to do is to be able to access my computer via ssh from another computer (not on the same network - or for that matter, in the same state). I think this has something to do with making me able to do that...

uknowho008
November 25th, 2008, 02:58 AM
I don't know if OpenDNS keeps track of you dynamic ip address like you want. But what I use it for is to connect to websites faster. There servers are faster than comcast so it just makes resolving domain names to IP addresses quicker.

klange
November 25th, 2008, 02:58 AM
It's an alternative DNS service that's probably faster than your ISPs due to their caching methods, updates faster, and is supposed to be more secure.

I use it, primarily because my ISP flushes and resets their DNS servers what seems to be every night at 9:00PM, which yields a broken Internet for me.


What you want to do has nothing to do with OpenDNS.

nightmare0
November 25th, 2008, 03:02 AM
If you want to be able to access your computer via SSH or host a site through Apache, then stick with DynDNS or No-IP. They both offer dynamic updates, so when your IP Address changes their DNS servers update too. They also give you a free subdomain to access your computer. blah blah blah. If you need more info just ask!

Prefix100
November 25th, 2008, 03:15 AM
A DNS replaces your IP with a memorable word adress.

FreeDNS or OpenDNS is a service that gives you a free DNS so that you don't pay to change you IP into words.

However, it won't be much use to you if you don't have the auto-update IP programs for the service installed, because the DNS needs to be updated with a new IP every time your IP changes ( which is more than likely with a normal ISP ).

Skripka
November 25th, 2008, 03:22 AM
It's an alternative DNS service that's probably faster than your ISPs due to their caching methods, updates faster, and is supposed to be more secure.

I use it, primarily because my ISP flushes and resets their DNS servers what seems to be every night at 9:00PM, which yields a broken Internet for me.


What you want to do has nothing to do with OpenDNS.

I use OpenDNS because quite frankly, 10000 monkeys typing into GNU eMacs would make a better DNS than the DNS of my ISP.

handy
November 25th, 2008, 03:52 AM
It's an alternative DNS service that's probably faster than your ISPs due to their caching methods, updates faster, and is supposed to be more secure.

I use it, primarily because my ISP flushes and resets their DNS servers what seems to be every night at 9:00PM, which yields a broken Internet for me.

Yes, that is why I used to use OpenDNS, though I have had a different ISP for well over a year now & use them as my DNS.

For what they do do, OpenDNS do it well.



What you want to do has nothing to do with OpenDNS.

To the OP, the above is absolutely true.

Athanasius
November 25th, 2008, 04:11 AM
Sounds good. I will give it a try. There seems to be good web filtering options, it is probably just dansguardian. If it works then I don't have to run it from my own computer.

Dr Small
November 25th, 2008, 04:22 AM
Sounds good. I will give it a try. There seems to be good web filtering options, it is probably just dansguardian. If it works then I don't have to run it from my own computer.
Actually, OpenDNS's filtering is based on domain names and user submitted ones that have been flagged for a certain category. You can filter certain categories, and any domain that is flagged in that category will be denied.

stmiller
November 25th, 2008, 07:35 AM
OpenDNS is great! You can set it up in your router. That is the best way to do it. Then your entire network will use it without having to make any changes on your computers or devices.

It is quite fast. Web page addresses resolve faster and your entire internet experience is faster than your isp's dns servers.

Sealbhach
November 25th, 2008, 11:49 AM
I use it. I find it faster.


.

blueturtl
November 25th, 2008, 12:16 PM
OpenDNS can also be used to circumvent stupid government policy.
Here in Finland we're having web censorship shoved down our throats by blocklists handed to ISPs from government officials/police. The supposed intent is to block child pornography while it has already been found that the blocklists are used to filter out other content as well. One such page was simply a public site that was critizising the blocklist approach and web censorship. So if you live in a country such as China or Finland or possibly one of the former soviet nations -- why not USA today actually -- OpenDNS is your friend if you wish to reach all of web and not just the slice the officials want you to see.

cyberfin
November 25th, 2008, 12:27 PM
Stunningly enough, I found OpenDNS to be slower than my isp's DNS'.

Then again my isp is in the top 5 of Spain's providers. Anyway, what I did find interesting and might be a future option in my houselhold, is that you can filter browsing and setup family filters.

When my daughter grows up to computer age, I will probably use it to setup appropriate filters.

Izek
November 25th, 2008, 03:39 PM
I didn't notice a performance increase much. In fact, I had troubles getting to certain sites after switching to openDNS. So I switched it back to auto, and everything worked better.

Dr Small
November 25th, 2008, 03:49 PM
OpenDNS is great! You can set it up in your router. That is the best way to do it. Then your entire network will use it without having to make any changes on your computers or devices.

I wish I could do that. Unfortunately, my router doesn't support this.

geoken
November 25th, 2008, 03:52 PM
However, it won't be much use to you if you don't have the auto-update IP programs for the service installed, because the DNS needs to be updated with a new IP every time your IP changes ( which is more than likely with a normal ISP ).

Many routers can do that. My netgear, for example, has a section where I can enter my DynDNS account info and it will update my IP every time the router detects it has been changed.

doorknob60
November 25th, 2008, 06:40 PM
I use it because my parents won't l;et me have a computer in my room if it doesn't have parental controls, and OPenDNS provides parental controls and you can "install" (can't think of a better word than that) it to your router and it's free. Also websites do seem to load a little faster, but it might eb just me.

smartboyathome
November 25th, 2008, 06:45 PM
I use OpenDNS at my house because Comcast's DNS isn't very good. This at least gives me some features, versus the bare minimum from Comcast.

Kernel Sanders
November 25th, 2008, 07:01 PM
Just tried this. Epic win. OpenDNS FTW! Internet speed FTW!

bobbocanfly
November 25th, 2008, 07:14 PM
I used to use openDNS but didn't like how it took over the DNS error pages. By default (at least for me) if i type in something like "ubuntu forums" it will do a google "I'm Feeling Lucky" and most of the time land me on the correct page. With OpenDNS it would just direct me to a dodgy OpenDNS search page with not very good results. If there was a way round that, I'd definately start using OpenDNS again.

Tristam Green
November 25th, 2008, 07:23 PM
I use OpenDNS simply because of one event that occurred last year: AT&T/Bellsouth ISP outage across an entire day for most of the Eastern Seaboard of the US because of a DNS outage. Been with OpenDNS since, and had no problems at all.

lifestream
November 25th, 2008, 07:39 PM
With OpenDNS it would just direct me to a dodgy OpenDNS search page with not very good results. If there was a way round that, I'd definately start using OpenDNS again.

There is, you just go to your OpenDNS account page, and turn that off.
That's one of the reasons why I use openDNS.
Another reason is that I do Web development, and buy/transfer a lot of websites. With OpenDNS, I don't have to wait 24 hours et al, to have my website working.

lswest
November 25th, 2008, 08:02 PM
There is, you just go to your OpenDNS account page, and turn that off.
That's one of the reasons why I use openDNS.
Another reason is that I do Web development, and buy/transfer a lot of websites. With OpenDNS, I don't have to wait 24 hours et al, to have my website working.

To be clearer, it's the auto-correction of typoes in the URL bar that's what you need to disable. Under the advanced configuration options of the Settings menu.

bobbocanfly
November 25th, 2008, 08:37 PM
To be clearer, it's the auto-correction of typoes in the URL bar that's what you need to disable. Under the advanced configuration options of the Settings menu.

Thanks thats fixed the problem I was having!

lswest
November 25th, 2008, 09:15 PM
Thanks thats fixed the problem I was having!

No worries, spent some time figuring it out myself after I read your post :P

bkaplan
December 6th, 2008, 05:20 AM
I'm having a strange issue with opendns: I configured it on my Westell dsl router. Internet works fine across my network (peer to peer, mixed ubuntu/XP boxes, mixed wired and wireless); however, the opendns configuration prevents my samba shares from being accessed anywhere on the network or from the host machines themselves. When I go back to my ISP's dns addresses, both internet and samba shares work fine across the entire network. I'm guessing it is some kind of loopback issue with opendns routing, but I'm not able to figure it out.

I'm pulling my hair out ... any ideas for a fix?

timzak
September 7th, 2009, 06:09 AM
I'm having a strange issue with opendns: I configured it on my Westell dsl router. Internet works fine across my network (peer to peer, mixed ubuntu/XP boxes, mixed wired and wireless); however, the opendns configuration prevents my samba shares from being accessed anywhere on the network or from the host machines themselves. When I go back to my ISP's dns addresses, both internet and samba shares work fine across the entire network. I'm guessing it is some kind of loopback issue with opendns routing, but I'm not able to figure it out.

I'm pulling my hair out ... any ideas for a fix?

Did you ever find a solution? I'm trying out opendns and just noticed the same issue.

cariboo
September 7th, 2009, 06:27 AM
If you have a problem with Samba and DNS please ask the question in the correct forum, in this case Networking & wireless (http:///ubuntuforums.org/forumdisplay.php?f=336).

This thread is closed.