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melojo
November 20th, 2008, 06:47 AM
I work at a school and in one of the 3 prong outlets (a standard plug) a prong was broke off from an extention cord and was protruding out from the socket. I have replaced residential outlets at home and new that as long as you didn't touch both wires you wouldn't get shocked. Needless to say I reached down and tried to pull the prong out of the socket and got a little shock and was puzzled. Is commerical wiring for a regular outlet that much different than a residential plug?

unknown03
November 20th, 2008, 06:56 AM
Hmm...not making much sense.

Be more specific. Which hole was the prong sticking out of? The ground, the neutral, or the hot?
Most commercial wiring is done with conduit and the outlets are in metal boxes on the surfaces.
Tiz important to know if the box the outlet was in was metal or conductive.

So if the prong you were trying to grab was stuck in the hot side of the outlet and you touched the box or conduit you'll be electrocuted, because the box and conduit are grounded. You create resistance so instead of tripping the breaker, the outlet thinks your a lamp or vacuum cleaner or something.
Also, very important to turn off the power first. If it was a standard 20 amp circuit your lucky you're alive -- 1 amp will kill a horse. And most people & electricians die from low voltage more than high-voltage (your exposed to it more)

Ocxic
November 20th, 2008, 06:56 AM
If you touch the hot wire, even if your not grounded, you will get a zap, it will prolly not be lethal, but you'll feel it for sure, I would recommend killing power to any electrical device before working on it, unless absolutely necessary.

I've had my arm go numb by getting zapped even tho i wans not grounded at all, it's not fun.

kevin11951
November 20th, 2008, 06:57 AM
I work at a school and in one of the 3 prong outlets (a standard plug) a prong was broke off from an extention cord and was protruding out from the socket. I have replaced residential outlets at home and new that as long as you didn't touch both wires you wouldn't get shocked. Needless to say I reached down and tried to pull the prong out of the socket and got a little shock and was puzzled. Is commerical wiring for a regular outlet that much different than a residential plug?

perhaps when you touched the prong, the connection arched, and caused a little shock... how strong was it?

melojo
November 20th, 2008, 07:04 AM
Hmm...not making much sense.

Be more specific. Which hole was the prong sticking out of? The ground, the neutral, or the hot?
Most commercial wiring is done with conduit and the outlets are in metal boxes on the surfaces.
Tiz important to know if the box the outlet was in was metal or conductive.

So if the prong you were trying to grab was stuck in the hot side of the outlet and you touched the box or conduit you'll be electrocuted, because the box and conduit are grounded.
Also, very important to turn off the power first. If it was a standard 20 amp circuit your lucky you're alive -- 1 amp will kill a horse. And most people & electricians die from low voltage more than high-voltage (your exposed to it more)

It was the neutral side. At the school they are upside down.

this was in block so no exposed box or conduit, but it does have a metal faceplate that was not touched. I am just woried that something is not wired correctly!

unknown03
November 20th, 2008, 07:04 AM
If you touch the hot wire, even if your not grounded, you will get a zap, it will prolly not be lethal, but you'll feel it for sure, I would recommend killing power to any electrical device before working on it, unless absolutely necessary.

I've had my arm go numb by getting zapped even tho i wans not grounded at all, it's not fun.

I have to respectfully disagree with you here. I am an electrician and touch hot wires all the time when I'm not able to turn off the power. You can, in fact, touch live wires, provided it isnt high voltage say past 10,000v, and not be shocked because you are insulated if you are not grounded in some way.

However, if you touch that same wire, or even the neutral, while its under a load you will definitely not have a good day.

unknown03
November 20th, 2008, 07:06 AM
It was the neutral side. At the school they are upside down.

this was in block so no exposed box or conduit, but it does have a metal faceplate that was not touched. I am just woried that something is not wired correctly!

Ok.. But just so you know, the screw that connects the metal face place to the outlet effectively grounds the faceplate

melojo
November 20th, 2008, 07:13 AM
I have to respectfully disagree with you here. I am an electrician and touch hot wires all the time when I'm not able to turn off the power. You can, in fact, touch live wires, provided it isnt high voltage say past 10,000v, and not be shocked because you are insulated if you are not grounded in some way.

However, if you touch that same wire, or even the neutral, while its under a load you will definitely not have a good day.

Nothing was plugged in the outlet at the time other than that one prong. Is that what you mean why it was under heavy load.

melojo
November 20th, 2008, 07:18 AM
perhaps when you touched the prong, the connection arched, and caused a little shock... how strong was it?

not much! Not like a getting shocked by 110v plug

unknown03
November 20th, 2008, 07:39 AM
Nothing was plugged in the outlet at the time other than that one prong. Is that what you mean why it was under heavy load. Also out of curiosity I stuck a small screw driver in the same side and it did spark and kick the breaker. I tried this at home with no effect. So I am curious to why it would have juice going through the neutral.

Nothing has to be plugged in to that particular outlet for the circuit to be on a load unless it was a dedicated circuit.

I would have to be there to observe what your talking about to really know what happened.

On a standard plug that is correctly polarized, the neutral hole is on the left, the hot on the right, and the ground on the bottom. If the outlets were upside down and you grabbed the prong that was on the left and touched the faceplate (even a little bit) then..well..you know..

But thats not to say its wired correctly, either. If you stuck a screw driver in what you thought was the neutral side and it popped the breaker then it wasnt the neutral side.

Also, its VERY possible that you could have just got a shock by good ole static electricity when you touched the neutral (which is in and of itself a ground).

The moral of the story, though, is to turn off all power before you do ANYTHING electrical related

kevin11951
November 20th, 2008, 07:40 AM
not much! Not like a getting shocked by 110v plug

ah...

i remember when i was little, i used to play with one of our outlets, that didnt have a faceplate...

i wonder how much nerve damage i caused.

melojo
November 20th, 2008, 07:54 AM
Nothing has to be plugged in to that particular outlet for the circuit to be on a load unless it was a dedicated circuit.

I would have to be there to observe what your talking about to really know what happened.

On a standard plug that is correctly polarized, the neutral hole is on the left, the hot on the right, and the ground on the bottom. If the outlets were upside down and you grabbed the prong that was on the left and touched the faceplate (even a little bit) then..well..you know..

But thats not to say its wired correctly, either. If you stuck a screw driver in what you thought was the neutral side and it popped the breaker then it wasnt the neutral side.

Also, its VERY possible that you could have just got a shock by good ole static electricity when you touched the neutral (which is in and of itself a ground).

The moral of the story, though, is to turn off all power before you do ANYTHING electrical related

The plug was upside down so i did stick it in the hot side. So is this normal then if you didn't touch any thing else to make a complete circuit?

I should have shut the power off but being stupid I didn't, but I knew it wasn't enough to cause damage.

unknown03
November 20th, 2008, 08:18 AM
The plug was upside down so i did stick it in the hot side. So is this normal then if you didn't touch any thing else to make a complete circuit?

I should have shut the power off but being stupid I didn't, but I knew it wasn't enough to cause damage.

It might not have been apparent at the time, but you did complete the circuit somehow. The faceplate, being metal, is in fact grounded provided the outlet is grounded. But there is the possibility that you touched it while the circuit was under a load and that will burn you. I have had countless blisters because my boss has his head up his *** when turning off breakers lol.

Though you may think there isnt any damage done, it is very plausible for you to die from touching something as little as 110v. Most likely, as I've said, the circuit was connected to a 20 amp breaker. Even a 15 amp lighting circuit can kill you by stopping your heart. It takes only 1 (one) amp to kill a horse and less than 1/2 an amp to stop your heart.

Though every situation is different, having the current go from your right hand to your left hand is a direct path through your chest and the most "popular" way to die by low voltage.

Point is, be careful.

melojo
November 20th, 2008, 08:30 AM
It might not have been apparent at the time, but you did complete the circuit somehow. The faceplate, being metal, is in fact grounded provided the outlet is grounded. But there is the possibility that you touched it while the circuit was under a load and that will burn you. I have had countless blisters because my boss has his head up his *** when turning off breakers lol.

Though you may think there isnt any damage done, it is very plausible for you to die from touching something as little as 110v. Most likely, as I've said, the circuit was connected to a 20 amp breaker. Even a 15 amp lighting circuit can kill you by stopping your heart. It takes only 1 (one) amp to kill a horse and less than 1/2 an amp to stop your heart.

Though every situation is different, having the current go from your right hand to your left hand is a direct path through your chest and the most "popular" way to die by low voltage.

Point is, be careful.

Like you said I must have touched the face plate some how to complete the circuit.

Thanks for the info!!!