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emobrad
November 19th, 2008, 12:23 AM
So, I was thinking of getting myself one of those Asus EEE PCs, and I was wondering if anyone would think that's worth it. I can read specs upon specs and it all comes down to, does anyone who has one recommend getting it? Any major issues? I have a $300 limit so that's why I was considering that

aysiu
November 19th, 2008, 01:40 AM
My major issue is that for 100% compatibility and a fast boot-up, you need to use the Xandros Linux that comes with it, but the Xandros that comes with it can be very annoying to deal with. More details on that here:
What’s so bad about the Eee PC Xandros anyway? (http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntucat/whats-so-bad-about-the-eee-pc-xandros-anyway/)

There are ways to get Ubuntu to work on it, but you'll never get the same fast boot time you get with Xandros.

aysiu
November 19th, 2008, 01:41 AM
My major issue is that for 100% compatibility and a fast boot-up, you need to use the Xandros Linux that comes with it, but the Xandros that comes with it can be very annoying to deal with. More details on that here:
What’s so bad about the Eee PC Xandros anyway? (http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntucat/whats-so-bad-about-the-eee-pc-xandros-anyway/)

There are ways to get Ubuntu to work on it, but you'll never get the same fast boot time you get with Xandros.

rsambuca
November 19th, 2008, 01:56 AM
I have been using an eee PC 900 for about six months now and am extremely happy with it (I purchased it prior to the Atom versions were out). I tested a bunch of different distros on it and ended up installing Arch linux permanently. Works perfectly. The one downside with the Celeron based units is the short battery life, but extra long battery life isn't something that I personally require for my use.

silkstone
November 20th, 2008, 06:53 PM
I'm liking Ubuntu-eee 8.04.1 on an eee PC 901. Apart from the boot time (at least double that of Xandros) everything else is hugely better. Ubuntu-eee comes with the Array kernel so wireless etc should work out-of-the-box.

They are currently working on a 'lean' kernel based on 8.10 which aims to cut boot time down to the same as Xandros.

bornagainpenguin
November 21st, 2008, 04:00 AM
I have an EeePC 901 I'm quite happy with these days, and enjoy the wonderful battery life that having an Intel Atom processor provides.

I use Intrepid Ibex (Ubuntu 8.10) with the array kernel and eee-control-tray.

My boot time is pretty good using concurrent booting, but I haven't timed it. Seems to start up fast enough except for a bit in the beginning when drivers are being detected. I get the impression there's a module issue somewhere or another that hangs temporarily during detection.

Otherwise I couldn't be happier with it except if it was more OSX86 friendly like the MSI Wind is. I like to have my options wide open...

--bornagainpenguin

bemental
February 25th, 2009, 06:57 PM
I also have been using an eee pc 900 for about three months with the array kernel and intrepid ibex.

I bought it primarily for video skyeping overseas and taking it to work and school; my PowerBook G4 17" was becoming much too big of a pain to lug around in a messenger bag.

In addition, practically all of my data is in the cloud or accessible via the internet thanks to Google Docs and Drop Box, so the only storage on the eee itself is the minimal shared files via Drop Box.

Overall, the eee is a great piece of gear, and with it's ability to boot from an SD memory card I can easily reinstall Ubuntu with minimal time and heartache (literally 10 minutes to setup all personal and kernel settings after a wipe).

brokenLockpick
February 27th, 2009, 11:49 AM
Been using a 900A for a few months which I got one super-sale at Best Buy for 200USD. Currently running 8.10 with the array kernel, but i've tested daily builds of 9.04 netbook remix and was surprised to see that "out of the box" it seems to work better than 8.10 did.

Through various tweaks I was able to get boot down to 21 seconds on 8.10 but benchmarks for 9.04 so far are in the same range with no tweaks which is promising.

I find a netbook to be extremely useful on campus, it's small enough to be unobtrusive in Labs for data entry and is great for my on campus job with the school's "computing department" where I might get sent out to test things dealing with the network or provide on site troubleshooting and/or repair for faculty/staff computers.

I really like the Asus eee line for the multi-touch trackpad and rather dislike the odd button location on some other models, notably Acers (vertically on opposite sides of the trackpad)

I recommend the SSD models for durability, I've seen enough faculty machines where a drop that is not hard enough to damage anything else can cause the read/write head to crash into the platters on traditional HDDs.
Edit: just to clarify, a head crash ruins a Hard Drive