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View Full Version : [all variants] [SOLVED] LAN Traffic and Monthly Bandwidth Cap



golbez_88rule
November 16th, 2008, 06:20 PM
I am interested in running a local streaming music server using Ubuntu so that I can listen to my music collection while using another computer in my LAN. My ISP (AT&T) is rumored to be starting bandwidth cap. My question: does LAN traffic (like transferring files between computers, streaming music from a local server, downloading shows off my PVR ReplayTV to my local PC) count towards the monthly bandwidth cap limits implemented by ISPs like Comcast and soon AT&T?

Ayuthia
November 16th, 2008, 09:38 PM
I am interested in running a local streaming music server using Ubuntu so that I can listen to my music collection while using another computer in my LAN. My ISP (AT&T) is rumored to be starting bandwidth cap. My question: does LAN traffic (like transferring files between computers, streaming music from a local server, downloading shows off my PVR ReplayTV to my local PC) count towards the monthly bandwidth cap limits implemented by ISPs like Comcast and soon AT&T?

Local traffic does not count towards the limit. It only counts when you are downloading/uploading things to the internet or surfing the web.

However, if you are streaming the shows from your house to someplace like a hotel, that will count towards your bandwidth. This is because you are using the internet to transfer the information from one computer to another.

When you are using things locally, it is transferring information from one computer, to the router, and then to the other computer. When you are downloading music or movies from the internet, you are going from one computer, to the router, over to the internet (via your ISP), back to the router, and back to your computer.

Hope that makes sense.

golbez_88rule
November 17th, 2008, 12:09 AM
Local traffic does not count towards the limit. It only counts when you are downloading/uploading things to the internet or surfing the web.

However, if you are streaming the shows from your house to someplace like a hotel, that will count towards your bandwidth. This is because you are using the internet to transfer the information from one computer to another.

When you are using things locally, it is transferring information from one computer, to the router, and then to the other computer. When you are downloading music or movies from the internet, you are going from one computer, to the router, over to the internet (via your ISP), back to the router, and back to your computer.

Hope that makes sense.

Thank you for your reply Ayuthia. Intuitively I thought this would be the case, but I wanted to be sure and I couldn't find any answer to it on Google. I've been listening to past episodes of the podcast "Linux Reality" and it has given me great ideas on setting up a media server that could stream files, music and video to any computer on the LAN.