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agger
December 3rd, 2005, 07:44 AM
Below, a very strange-sounding press release from FSF France. Anyone from France out there who knows more about what's going on?
French Government Lobbied to Ban Free Software

November 25, 2005, for immediate release

Friday November 18th, 2005, French Department of Culture. SNEP and SCPP have told Free Software authors: "You will be required to change your licenses." SACEM add: "You shall stop publishing free software," and warn they are ready "to sue free software authors who will keep on publishing source code" should the "VU/SACEM/BSA/FA Contents Department"[1] bill proposal pass in the Parliament.

It appears that publishing Free Software giving access to culture is about to become a counterfeiting criminal offence. Will SACEM sue France Télécom R&D research labs for having published Maay and Solipsis (P2P pieces of software used to exchange data)[2]?

Up to this point, the rather technical debate surrounding the issues addressed by DADVSI bill (copyright and neighbouring rights in the information society) makes one ask: Just how much control do the Big Players in the field of culture want to seize? It now looks like years of quibbling have put an end to compromises.

What should have been the last meeting of CSPLA[2] Sirinelli Commission turned into an arranged battle dealing with the "VU/SACEM/BSA/FA Contents Department" bill. EUCD.INFO[4] cofounder Christophe Espern, representing Creative Commons France, had to argue for 13 hours to defend the right of Free Software to exist, but he lost the argument. The preliminary conclusions seem to regret that the bill "cannot be proposed by CSPLA in before the deadline." Maybe the new meeting scheduled today, November 25th, 2005, at 6:30pm, in the offices of the French Department of Culture, aims to impose the text ?

"Havoc is breaking loose," says Christophe Espern. "How can people possibly both pretend to defend culture and then want to ban the only software giving universal access to it? Actually, the contradiction may be only superficial: I think what they are truly after is the control of the public... culture is just a excuse."

Absurd as it may seem, the DADVSI bill will bring an indifferent public a surprise gift [5] for Christmas nothing less than complete Orwellian control of digital culture.

We could avoid this disaster if the cabinet of Prime Minister started by declaring the DADVSI bill a non emergency issue. This would give the democratic debate a chance.
http://www.fsffrance.org/news/article2005-11-25.en.html

newbie2
December 3rd, 2005, 07:53 AM
http://lxer.com/module/newswire/view/49126/index.html


Notes about the organisations

SACEM is the main company dealing with collective copyright management for music in France. French RIAA.

SNEP (Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique, national syndicate of phonographic publishing), was created in 1922. Spokesman for its 48 members, it represents them towards the government, the MP, the administration, other professional bodies, the media and the public.

SCPP (Société Civile des Producteurs Phonographiques, civil company of phonographic editors), gathers the money collected towards the users of phonograms and videomusic users and redistributes it to its members (more than 800 producers, including many independent producers and the main international companies such as Sony BMG, EMI, Universal, and Warner). It weighs more than 80% of the copyrights perceived by the French producers.

So... not the French Government. ****wit submitter, ****wit eds.
http://yro.slashdot.org/yro/05/12/02/2040237.shtml?tid=123&tid=185&tid=219&tid=106

ubuntu27
December 3rd, 2005, 07:53 AM
What!!?? :shock: ](*,)
... I just want to say: "^%(%^$*&#(&(*&"

Kuolio
December 3rd, 2005, 11:11 AM
I'm speechles.. And I thought that we fins got a rotten deal with our new copyright/contentprotection law, but seems that frenchpeople will be getting a lot worse one then we.

doitashimashite
December 3rd, 2005, 11:32 AM
http://www.infoshop.org/inews/article.php?story=20051108121623997 :wink:

commodore
December 3rd, 2005, 12:08 PM
.|..

public_void
December 3rd, 2005, 01:01 PM
I'm sceptical about the first article, I think there maybe a misunderstanding or the article is bias in some way. I maybe missing the point here, but I'm confused about that article. I don't think it is saying what I think is intended.

agger
December 3rd, 2005, 01:12 PM
I'm sceptical about the first article, I think there maybe a misunderstanding or the article is bias in some way. I maybe missing the point here, but I'm confused about that article. I don't think it is saying what I think is intended.

The problem is this part, as snipped from Le Monde (http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0,1-0@2-651865,36-716172,0.html), which means that the suggested law wants to:


assimiler à un délit de contrefaçon l'édition, la diffusion et la promotion de tout logiciel susceptible d'être utilisé pour mettre à disposition des informations protégées par le droit d'auteur et n'intégrant pas un dispositif de contrôle et de traçage de l'usage privé (mesure technique)." "Tout logiciel permettant le téléchargement comme certains logiciels de discussion instantanée (chat), tout logiciel serveur est concerné (P2P, HTTP, FTP, SSH, ...)

Rough translation: 'It will become an offence of counterfeit to issue, distribute or promote any software capable of being used to make available information protected by copyright which does not contain a remedy to control and track any private citisen's use. ' This (the newspaper adds) will include any kind of server, i.e., P2P, HTTP, FTP, SSH, and just about anything else which communicates over the Internet (surely also including music and video players).

Moreover, distributing the source code for any such software will be illegal (according to the entertainment industry) since this amounts to distribution where people can take out the control.

So ... this may not affect all free software, but as far as I can see it will ban a lot of applications; if, of course, it's ever implemented.

I still find it hard to believe it will be possible to enforce or pass such strict regulations, though. Any French participants out there who know more about the subject?

23meg
December 3rd, 2005, 01:18 PM
It will become an offence of counterfeit to issue, distribute or promote any software capable of being used to make available information protected by copyright which does not contain a remedy to control and track any private citisen's use. 'By this definition not only P2P apps but everything from Apache to Gaim is under threat as well. And guess what the criteria will be for "containing a remedy to control and track any private citizen's use" once more countries get this kind of law going: DRM, and in turn TC.

endersshadow
December 3rd, 2005, 02:09 PM
Didn't the Parisian government just switch to OO.o? I'm a bit skeptical, as the French government has been one that's been pushing Microsoft and really taking steps toward OSS...at least, so I thought...

DoeRayMe
December 3rd, 2005, 04:26 PM
So this would mean anyone in France could not use OSS?

hopefully this doesnt happen in the UK :|

Stormy Eyes
December 3rd, 2005, 04:37 PM
I think it's time for another French Revolution.

Kimm
December 3rd, 2005, 04:43 PM
Not just a french one!... but isnt there one in the runnings allredy? Or something similar that is.



Didn't the Parisian government just switch to OO.o? I'm a bit skeptical, as the French government has been one that's been pushing Microsoft and really taking steps toward OSS...at least, so I thought...


If they have, then there is probably no need to worry, the suggestion will be turned down.



everything from Apache to Gaim is under threat as well


Is Apache and Gaim French?
Surely they can not ban Apache, apache along with Linux pretty much made the Internet revolution.

syncme
December 3rd, 2005, 04:54 PM
This must be some misunderstanding considering the french government uses Linux:

http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph?site=www.premier-ministre.gouv.fr

23meg
December 3rd, 2005, 05:53 PM
Is Apache and Gaim French?
Surely they can not ban Apache, apache along with Linux pretty much made the Internet revolution.They don't have to be originating from France; read the sentence again, they were just random examples that came to my mind.

lila
December 3rd, 2005, 06:44 PM
Hi there,
I'm planning to move to France in the next couple of years with my boyfriend who is French, to make our lives there and open a business. So reading this gave both of us a near heart attack. Went onto the French Ubuntu forum http://ubuntu-fr.org and searched around. Those of you who read French, might want to read this: http://forum.ubuntu-fr.org/viewtopic.php?id=15990

It looks like it's a very real threat. The law is due to be decided on on 22nd December, and the French Linux community seems to be panicking. It's not just Linux either, it would be illegal to do all sorts of normal things such as downloading a legally purchased CD (that you still have) onto an MP3 player, or having a copy in your car of a legally purchased CD that you keep in your home. It would hence make large parts of the population into criminals over night. And it's not symbolic either: 3 years prison and or (I didn't quite get if it was and or or) 300 000 Euros fine (that's roughly the same in USDollars - not pocket money for most people, anyway).

On the French Ubuntu Forum they are asking people to phone the culture minister's office (responsible for the whole thing) and complain and protest, and to write letters to their parliamentary delegates and the culture minister. The telephone number is:
++33 (0)140 15 8000 (if you are not used to international phonecalls: find out you country's international code from the phone book and insert for the ++, it's 00 for most, but not all countries. The (0) is for when you are in France, everyone else ignore it).
We just called them telling them that we were planning to open a business in France but if that becomes law we couldn't because Linux is an integrated and ideologicallly important part of our business strategy (which it is), and they just listened to us and told us to call back Monday morning 9 o'clock, as they are closed now (France is GMT+1).
If anyone speaks French and could phone them, great, if you don't, try in your own language, that should cause them a logistical nightmare (they are not used to having to deal with people who don't speak French). Tell them you are using French Open source software and it would cause you problems and their country's reputation would seriously suffer in the business and technolgy world.
You could also write to them, the French culture ministry has a website www.culture.gouv.fr but there doesn't seem to be a postal address on it. However, these seem to be two relevant e-mail addresses:
ressources.ddat@culture.gouv.fr
cdja.sdaj@culture.gouv.fr

Tell them why it would cause you personally problems using french software, talking to French Linux community..., apart from the fact that you would find it unethical etc.

Well, I don't know, but it looks like my campaigning hat came out of the cuppoard of it's own accord... (Good old amnesty technique the letters and phonecalls... works, too!). But, as I said, I do feel very concerned, and it really is personal for me. We know quite a number of French Linux people. Guess we'll spend the night on the phone to them.
Cheers,
Lila

teaker1s
December 3rd, 2005, 07:01 PM
madness

thenoobest1
December 3rd, 2005, 08:33 PM
:( this is sad.... the US will probably be next.

benplaut
December 3rd, 2005, 09:36 PM
.|..

o/t, but as for your sig... i've been looking for a C shell and can't find any stores selling them - where is she located? ;)

earobinson
December 3rd, 2005, 09:54 PM
This must be fake, what about products that use open source, cellphones tvio (no?) firefox, gaim, and im sure there are windows only open source programs 2. This makes no sence

if this is true i will have died a little inside

Eternlloveoflife
December 3rd, 2005, 09:54 PM
Hi there,
I'm planning to move to France in the next couple of years with my boyfriend who is French, to make our lives there and open a business. So reading this gave both of us a near heart attack. Went onto the French Ubuntu forum http://ubuntu-fr.org and searched around. Those of you who read French, might want to read this: http://forum.ubuntu-fr.org/viewtopic.php?id=15990

It looks like it's a very real threat. The law is due to be decided on on 22nd December, and the French Linux community seems to be panicking. It's not just Linux either, it would be illegal to do all sorts of normal things such as downloading a legally purchased CD (that you still have) onto an MP3 player, or having a copy in your car of a legally purchased CD that you keep in your home. It would hence make large parts of the population into criminals over night. And it's not symbolic either: 3 years prison and or (I didn't quite get if it was and or or) 300 000 Euros fine (that's roughly the same in USDollars - not pocket money for most people, anyway).

On the French Ubuntu Forum they are asking people to phone the culture minister's office (responsible for the whole thing) and complain and protest, and to write letters to their parliamentary delegates and the culture minister. The telephone number is:
++33 (0)140 15 8000 (if you are not used to international phonecalls: find out you country's international code from the phone book and insert for the ++, it's 00 for most, but not all countries. The (0) is for when you are in France, everyone else ignore it).
We just called them telling them that we were planning to open a business in France but if that becomes law we couldn't because Linux is an integrated and ideologicallly important part of our business strategy (which it is), and they just listened to us and told us to call back Monday morning 9 o'clock, as they are closed now (France is GMT+1).
If anyone speaks French and could phone them, great, if you don't, try in your own language, that should cause them a logistical nightmare (they are not used to having to deal with people who don't speak French). Tell them you are using French Open source software and it would cause you problems and their country's reputation would seriously suffer in the business and technolgy world.
You could also write to them, the French culture ministry has a website www.culture.gouv.fr but there doesn't seem to be a postal address on it. However, these seem to be two relevant e-mail addresses:
ressources.ddat@culture.gouv.fr
cdja.sdaj@culture.gouv.fr

Tell them why it would cause you personally problems using french software, talking to French Linux community..., apart from the fact that you would find it unethical etc.

Well, I don't know, but it looks like my campaigning hat came out of the cuppoard of it's own accord... (Good old amnesty technique the letters and phonecalls... works, too!). But, as I said, I do feel very concerned, and it really is personal for me. We know quite a number of French Linux people. Guess we'll spend the night on the phone to them.
Cheers,
Lila


This is greatly disturbing to me. Although the potential of this has far reaching effects that no one has mentioned yet. This could, and likely would, effect the linux community on very large scale.

The main issue I have with this is, most of the linux community is pretty legitimate, always making things legal and what not, yet programs that practially endorse illegal activity, ie most P2P. Sure on the surface, they may be trying to fight it saying it's not our fault because we don't have control over the type of media that the users have, that's how most torrent sites stay in business/operation.

Linux is different, we strive to create programs of genuine legitimate use, and have been under fire from the time Linus Torvalds created the kernel.

My point to all of this is, if the ban open source software, it'll open up a pandora's box, people will still have the software, and still continue to develope it. The problem is, it'll just get pushed underground. Persecution will persist, but coders will still code.

From my understanding, most people code/develope for linux because they see a need for a given program, and so do other people, hence why they keep coding/releasing. Not for monetary gain. So people will still develope.

This is all based on a worst case scenario. I don't think it will get that bad, public outcry will ensue quickly if this passes. And this could really become a global issue, and fast. I for one would be writting to my local UN delegate to bring up some sort of UN judgement on open source for the entire world.

This is not a small topic, this is not a minor debate within a country, this could, and WOULD effect every single person in the open source community across the world.

And should be treated as such.

Kimm
December 3rd, 2005, 09:59 PM
I just wrote an e-mail asking them to come to their sences...



Dear Culture Ministry of France,

I have been reading about your bill to make distribution of Source Code illegal, and to tell you the truth, I am chocked to hear about it. It is plainly unethical, is it not the individuals choice what to do with something that he or she has created by themselves?

Open Source software is a great asset to the world, not only is it a great source of knowledge but also functional and highly reliable software at the lowest possible price.

I may not be French, and I may not even speak the language, but, perhaps this will emphasis how extremely wrong this is even more. I am from Sweden but even I will be personally affected if this bill was to pass. Is it not a democracy we live in? Then listen to the people and not the major companies, this is not what the people wants, and I can assure you that this subject will not be put to a rest until the people gets what the people wants.

It is downright unethical, you plan to remove something that is everyone's right? Is it not only fair for any developer, or perhaps Artist, to distribute whatever they have worked hard on, in any way they find suitable? What's next? will it become illegal to write a message on ones shirt and then wear it? It is very much the same thing.

I very much hope that you will open your eyes and come to your senses,
Sincerely - Kim Lindgren - Open Source Developer.

blastus
December 3rd, 2005, 10:17 PM
If they really want to ban publishing, distributing, using, possessing or whatever free and open source software, then they will have to ban the Internet in France. Aren't there already riots in France?

agger
December 3rd, 2005, 11:17 PM
If they really want to ban publishing, distributing, using, possessing or whatever free and open source software, then they will have to ban the Internet in France. Aren't there already riots in France?

I think it might be worth it to reemphasize what's actually being proposed.

They are not pushing a Bill to explicitly ban Free/Open Source software.
But, due to heavy lobbying by the entertainment industry they're pushing a Bill which will outlaw the release, distribution and promotion of any software that can be used to transmit copyrighted material in any way which does not have mechanisms built in for control and tracking - i.e., DRM and/or some sort of "ET phone home" spyware.

The French entertainment industry believes that this means that distributing source code for Open Source programs doing any of the above will become illegal.

This is NOT an overt ban on F/LOSS, but it IS a rather serious threat, since practically all useful Internet-enabled software wouldn't be able to be free any more.

Do the French government really realize the consequences? probably not. Does that mean the legislation probably cannot go through as such; We sure should hope so.

But: Is there a reason to protest this? Definitely, YES - if such a large segment of F/LOSS is really outlawed, it's a really serious threat to a lot of things. Like ordinary political freedom, e.g.

GeneralZod
December 3rd, 2005, 11:24 PM
But: Is there a reason to protest this? Definitely, YES - if such a large segment of F/LOSS is really outlawed, it's a really serious threat to a lot of things. Like ordinary political freedom, e.g.

Another reason is that this is another of those underhanded "rush a bill through as quickly as possible when nobody is looking!"-type affairs; the decision will be made on 22/23rd December when attentions are usually focussed elsewhere and the bill has, rather oddly, been given "emergency" status when it deserves nothing of the sort.

This is every bit as sneaky and deplorable as tagging the Software Patents bill on the end of that Fisheries and Agriculture bill, or whatever it was.

detyabozhye
December 3rd, 2005, 11:48 PM
o.O Wow! Did BillG pay them or something?

kairu0
December 4th, 2005, 01:06 AM
If this is actually being considered in France as it is presented in this forums, then I say it is almost as brilliant as G.B. pulling the condom distribution from Africa. :)

bytter
December 4th, 2005, 03:57 AM
Is anyone aware of this?!?

http://www.fsffrance.org/news/article2005-11-25.en.html

Someone pinch me... And when I though the world couldn't get more stupid...

newbie2
December 4th, 2005, 04:02 AM
Is anyone aware of this?!?

http://www.fsffrance.org/news/article2005-11-25.en.html

Someone pinch me... And when I though the world couldn't get more stupid...
already discussed here ;) -->
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=98337

aysiu
December 4th, 2005, 04:03 AM
already discussed here ;) -->
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=98337 Threads merged.

bytter
December 4th, 2005, 04:05 AM
Oops :P Hadn't realized it :) I've just went with a "Guru Meditation Error" on this story...

bytter
December 4th, 2005, 03:18 PM
I guess this topic will just die out :(

az
December 4th, 2005, 07:42 PM
they're pushing a Bill which will outlaw the release, distribution and promotion of any software that can be used to transmit copyrighted material in any way which does not have mechanisms built in for control and tracking - i.e., DRM and/or some sort of "ET phone home" spyware.


The ogg format spec does have a DRM flag. If it is set and your ogg player looks for it, it will not play. A situation like this is why that is there. It could become illegal in France to compile and run an ogg player with the DRM functions disabled, much like it is illegal here in North America to encode something with LAME without buying an MP3 licence.

The real meat is how they are going to go about it. It is a severe affront to freedom to prohibit the distribution of source code.



The French entertainment industry believes that this means that distributing source code for Open Source programs doing any of the above will become illegal.


I'm on the edge of ma chaise.

kiddo
December 4th, 2005, 07:55 PM
OK, please correct me if I am wrong, as I am not a French from France and I don't truly know their justice/law system.

TheEnigmaSoldier: http://www.hermann-uwe.de/blog/french-government-lobbied-to-ban-free-software (http://www.hermann-uwe.de/blog/french-government-lobbied-to-ban-free-software) wtf?
Kiddo: *clicks*
Kiddo: "Cet amendement semble s'inspirer du projet de loi SSSCA/CBDTPA, un projet de loi américain qui fut finalement rejeté tant il menaçait l'économie et la sécurité économique nationale américaine."
Kiddo: which means: this amendment seems to be inspired from the SSSCA/CBDTPA american law project, which was rejected because it was a real threat to the whole economy and american national economy security
Kiddo: ok so now you have that totally f*** idea from another f... company
Kiddo: what kind of odds do you think there is that this thing actually gets accepted? I mean come on
TheEnigmaSoldier: So there is no way it will be passed
TheEnigmaSoldier: Yeah
Kiddo: well think about it, that means anything, including protocols and such
Kiddo: oh, well why not email while we're at it
TheEnigmaSoldier: yup
Kiddo: and ftp, and the notion of copying files itself
Kiddo: hey, just thought of something
Kiddo: what about random allocation memory? :)
Kiddo: that's infrigement too!
Kiddo: good luck passing a bill like that without putting 130% of your technology market out of the country imho
Kiddo: I didn't get the logic yet
TheEnigmaSoldier: nice
Kiddo: well that's just my ~logical thinking, I don't believe it is at all possible
Kiddo: this is dumber than software patents. a lot.




Then, I emailed some people over there, here's what I got (this is my translation of the reply):
"XD, SNEP/SCPP/SACEM are ~= RIAA/MPAA, and strictly speaking they are useless and powerless in France (for example, they wanted to have a law passed making "automatic scans of P2P networks and automatic sending of legislative data and emails, sent to the justice dept and all that crap.... well the CNIL rejected it (national computering and freedom comission). Basically, EVERYTHING has to be approved by the CNIL first, and cases like this certainly don't.

Besides, if that's one more of those stupid French law projects, nothing to worry about. They transit multiple times between the senate and the whateverthisthingiscalled, and they usually get rejected or modified almost entirely. For example, the LEN a few years ago was passed, however it was so modified from the original it's totally worthless now"

From: FF7Sephiroth
Date: Dec 2, 2005 7:54 AM
Subject: Re: idée bien française :)
To: Kiddo
Vendredi 18 novembre 2005, au ministère de la Culture, le SNEP et la SCPP déclarent aux auteurs de Logiciel Libre : « Vous allez changer vos licences. » La SACEM ajoute : « Vous allez arrêter de publier vos logiciels. » Et se déclare prête à « poursuivre les auteurs de logiciels libres continuant de divulguer leur code source » si l'amendement « VU/SACEM/BSA/FT Division Contenus » [1] était voté par les parlementaires.
xD mais ces sociétés (SNEP, SCPP et SACEM), c'est les équivalents français de la RIAA/MPAA XDDDDD Bref, ils servent à rien et n'ont aucun pouvoir (exemple : y'as quelques temps (mois/semaines) ils voulaient mettre en place un système permettant de "scanner" automatiquement les réseaux de P2P... avec envoi de courrier automatique, dossier transmis à la justice et tout le bordel... ben la CNIL (Commission Nationale Informatique et Libertées... bref DÈS qu'un système informatique relève des informations sur le public (ça peut être tout et n'importe quoi ! de Echelon jusqu'au logs d'apache d'un hébergeur gratos...), faut qu'il reçoive un agrément de la CNIL l'autorisant à le faire...) ne leur a jamais donné d'agrément xD)

Plus sérieusement... si c'est encore un des projets de lois français àlacon... ben y'as pas à s'inquiéter. Le système législatif français fait que les lois transitent plusieurs fois entre sénat/assemblée nationale/whatever m'en rapelle plus et suis pas super bon en cours d'éducation civique, y'arrive qu'au final, dans quasiment tous les cas, soit c'est refusé, soit ils acceptent en changeant quasiment tout xD voir la LEN y'as quelques années... ben finalement c'est passé. Mais ça a tellement été modifié qu'ajd on risque pas plus qu'avant xD

f76
December 10th, 2005, 04:06 PM
When there is a conflict between law and common sense there is always frustration and you have to ask your self did i help elect these morons? Soon perhaps hardware without drm will be banned and then the linux community will be stuck with old hardware. If such a law is passed in my country i WILL break the law. No question about it.

yfkar
December 10th, 2005, 07:31 PM
Here's some text in English: http://eucd.info/index.php?English-readers

If something like that would really pass, it would mean that even game servers would have to be patched somehow to prevent usage of copyrighted works. :|

---

Is assimilated to a crime of counterfeiting:

1st - the act, in knowledge of doing so, of publishing or putting on public access, in any form whatsoever, a software manifestly destined to put works or objects protected by a literary and artistic right on unauthorised access to the public, that doesn't understand the measures for preserving these protected works or objects against unauthorised use by a state of technology.

2nd - the act of publishing or putting on public access, under any form that it is, a software other than that described in the 1st above, since, having knowledge of that which the software is manifestly used for the putting on unauthorised access to the public of works or objects protected by a literary and artistic right, the publisher has not taken measures, by a state of technology, to preserve these works or objects protected against an unauthorised use.

3rd - the act, in knowledge of causing, of directly promoting the putting on public access under some form that it is or the use of a software described in 1st or 2nd above.

4th - the above provisions apply without prejudice to the application of the provisions of article L121-7 of the Penal Code and those of the law of 21 June 2004.inst an unauthorised use.

---

The part "...the act of publishing or putting on public access, under any form that it is, a software other than that described in the 1st above, since, having knowledge of that which the software is manifestly used for the putting on unauthorised access to the public of works or objects protected by a literary and artistic right..." could make even Notepad illegal if people used it to digitize copyrighted books. ;)

imagine
December 22nd, 2005, 09:05 PM
What about an about-turn:

In the discussion of this new law in the parliament, the opposition managed to get an amendment passed that allows the sharing of music and other things (I'm not very good at reading French) for private use. People must pay a yet to be determined fee to their ISPs which gives them some kind of global license to all songs for private use.
Most of the members of the parliament already left, when the proposal was accepted by 30 to 28 votes in the night. Hehe.

Of course the law must also be accepted by the second chamber, the senate, and that new amemdment doesn't take away the threat to free software. However it's finally a step in the right direction.

http://yro.slashdot.org/yro/05/12/22/1322228.shtml

BoyOfDestiny
July 4th, 2006, 08:52 AM
French Parliament approves the worst copyright law in Europe

Paris, 30 june 2006,

http://www.eucd.info/index.php?2006/06/30/333-french-parliament-approves-the-worst-copyright-law-in-europe

I'm curious to how this will effect videolan... :(

yaztromo
July 4th, 2006, 11:08 AM
This is terrible. Once this is law that would mean using Gaim in france would be illegal?

Crazy!

tukuyomi
July 4th, 2006, 04:42 PM
Gaim as well as Apache (any HTTP server actually), any FTP Server, any torrent client, any... internet connection? Sad.

AlexC_
July 4th, 2006, 04:48 PM
What the ....... there making it illegal to use free software?! That's ****. A quick solution would be to charge 1p for it :D

RavenOfOdin
July 4th, 2006, 07:53 PM
Well, what I'm getting out of this story is nothing more than the music/movie companies over there puffing their chests out and threatening to do something which is A) not going to get far and B) something they don't have any real control over in the first place. Isn't counterfeiting pretty much to take something which is understood by all to have intrinsic monetary value (ie: 20 dollar bills or expensive shoes) and then copy them with third rate goods so the lesser material now has the value of the greater? FLOSS by virtue of itself has no monetary value. It is free.

So their proposition is not only stupid, it is inherently flawed.

(BTW! Why not make all Internet communication in France go through one firewall, which is set to block HTTP queries for open source software? They'd be well on their way to looking like China at that point.)

AirRaven
July 4th, 2006, 11:26 PM
Quelle horreur.:eek:

What a disaster. I wonder how the FSF are going to combar this decision? It's going to take a lot of work to overturn this decision.

Since VideoLAN is Open Source, you're probably not going to see an end to development- someone in a country with more lenient laws will inevitably fork it. But the result of this decision is still depressing.

Here's hoping a similar decision doesn't make it to the UK.

erniewinner
July 4th, 2006, 11:37 PM
:evil: "are you satan are you man you changed the laws since it began..." (black sabbath, the writ.)
dear oh dear. down to money again??? is money the only important buisness princple. i suppose our generation will get the blame for doing nothing about this kind of thing!!! and if we do anything we are "terrorists." france is capable of seriously crappy laws like anywhere else, because crappy people are at the heart of this kind of thing. as yet we don't have to slaughter our first born males to use a computer. so you might as well enjoy the humdrum/ mediocre music/ film/ games of our generation. while you can... yadda yadda. (the things they are so desperate to protect...) i hope someone brings in a law if you think their software is a pile of cack you can get your money back etc... but i doubt it. :-?

Viva
July 25th, 2009, 08:15 AM
I know this is an old thread, but I'm wondering if open source is still legal in France.

Giant Speck
July 25th, 2009, 08:43 AM
I know this is an old thread, but I'm wondering if open source is still legal in France.

I would imagine so; their entire police force just switched to Ubuntu about a year ago.

gn2
July 25th, 2009, 12:36 PM
It was the Gendarmerie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Gendarmerie) that switched to Ubuntu (http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2009/03/french-police-saves-millions-of-euros-by-adopting-ubuntu.ars).
They are a different organisation from the French National Police (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_National_Police).

I remember reading that the French parliament were going to switch to Ubuntu (http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/03/12/0257212), but I don't know if it went ahead.

Mornedhel
July 25th, 2009, 12:44 PM
FOSS is still legal here, yes. Even the Ministry of Culture and Communication, the one pushing for tighter regulations and sanctions against piracy, uses OpenOffice.

Elfy
July 25th, 2009, 01:11 PM
with that I will close this resurrected thread and send it back to the grave