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k33bz
November 14th, 2008, 08:49 PM
OK, I am ready to tackle this one now, since It was of the few things I always wanted to learn. I have booked marked alot of sites on Programming in c++. But what opensource tools will I need to start doing the tutorials, and learn how to program?

Titan8990
November 14th, 2008, 08:51 PM
I'm not sure about good IDLEs but for compiling C/C++ programs you will need:


sudo apt-get install build-essentials

k33bz
November 14th, 2008, 08:55 PM
I'm not sure about good IDLEs but for compiling C/C++ programs you will need:


sudo apt-get install build-essentials

Thanks for the quick response, I seem to already have that installed however.

Titan8990
November 14th, 2008, 09:19 PM
IMO, you should click the report button for this post and ask a mod to move this thread to the Programming Talk forum.

ilrudie
November 14th, 2008, 10:20 PM
Other than build essential all you need is a text editor. gedit (a.k.a Application->Accessories->Text Edit) is installed in Ubuntu by default. I personally like vi or vim because no matter what unix variant you find yourself using you have a good text editor. It's probably not worth learning how to use vi (its very powerful but has a very steep learning curve) unless you plan on doing a lot of text editing over ssh. Everyone has a setup they prefer and many will defend it fiercly all the way to the grave. Just try out some text editors and find one that seems to work the way you like.

You can also try out some IDEs if you want but IMO learning with an IDE from the begining is a bit like learning to use a nail gun before you know what a hammer is.

Hope that helps and happy learning.

doas777
November 14th, 2008, 10:33 PM
You can also try out some IDEs if you want but IMO learning with an IDE from the begining is a bit like learning to use a nail gun before you know what a hammer is.

Hope that helps and happy learning.

you know, that is an interesting perspective; the whole trial by fire thing.

I'm inclined to agree if you are enrolled full time in a traditional CS bachelors program.

For the hobbiest or self-student however, I would recomend the exact opposite, starting with an IDE, and getting deeper into it as you go.

in my case, I started with practicum, and worked my way back to theory. if I had spent years trying to learn all the theory with no opportunity to practice it in any real or meaningful way, I would not be getting paid to write code today.

I would propose that the poster look at his/her current level of understanding, and decide what they want to focus on first, linking and compiling, or actually writing some C.

cheers,
Franklin

k33bz
November 15th, 2008, 05:15 PM
thanks for all your guys help, I have build-essential, gcc, and anjuta as my IDE. I will start on all this most likely tomorrow.