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JumpForJoy
November 14th, 2008, 02:00 AM
Is there anything good/bad about using Ubuntu as the root? I just installed a fresh copy and I was wonder. As I said, a clean copy, so I don't have to worry about moving any files out of the root. Thanks.

Tak11
November 14th, 2008, 02:04 AM
Is there anything good/bad about using Ubuntu as the root? I just installed a fresh copy and I was wonder. As I said, a clean copy, so I don't have to worry about moving any files out of the root. Thanks.

root is just an administrative account, if you run everyday programs, *that don't require root* like xchat, etc. It can screw your sistem up, or become a security thret.

only run root when you need it, *ie to install a package etc.

beercz
November 14th, 2008, 02:06 AM
Read this (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo)

JumpForJoy
November 14th, 2008, 02:08 AM
Ok, Thank you. I will make a new account as soon as I can.

taurus
November 14th, 2008, 02:11 AM
Ok, Thank you. I will make a new account as soon as I can.

Didn't you create one during the installing process?

JumpForJoy
November 14th, 2008, 02:27 AM
Didn't you create one during the installing process?
Ok. I see, I assumed this was the root, because I caouldn't login as the root. I see my large misstake here. so is it safe to use the file I created during installation? Thanks.

taurus
November 14th, 2008, 02:31 AM
Yes, use the username and password that you created during the installing process. That's your account to use. And if you need root privilege to install, modify, or delete something, then put sudo in front of the command and use the same password that you log in with. No need to create another account for you.

benhur99ph
November 14th, 2008, 02:44 AM
Do not use the root account unless it is really needed. Using root account can cause damage to your system and become a security threat (as previously said).

That is why ubuntu disables the use of the root account by default. If you really want to use it then go to System>Administration>Login Window and under the Security tab, check the "Allow local Administrator login" checkbox. Then go to System>Administration>Users and Groups and set the password for the root account.

JumpForJoy
November 14th, 2008, 03:04 AM
Didn't you create one during the installing process?


Do not use the root account unless it is really needed. Using root account can cause damage to your system and become a security threat (as previously said).

That is why ubuntu disables the use of the root account by default. If you really want to use it then go to System>Administration>Login Window and under the Security tab, check the "Allow local Administrator login" checkbox. Then go to System>Administration>Users and Groups and set the password for the root account.

Thank You. I will continue to use the acount set up when I installed Ubuntu.

Kellemora
November 14th, 2008, 04:14 AM
Hi JFJ

IF you do reset-up your system, this is the best time to set up a SEPARATE PARTITION as your /home partition (home is where ALL of your user data and settings are stored).

Makes for easy backup and also, should you upgrade, you don't chance losing all your settings and data, nonetheless, you should still backup before doing an upgrade just to be safe.

TTUL
Gary

JumpForJoy
November 14th, 2008, 10:11 PM
Hi JFJ

IF you do reset-up your system, this is the best time to set up a SEPARATE PARTITION as your /home partition (home is where ALL of your user data and settings are stored).

Makes for easy backup and also, should you upgrade, you don't chance losing all your settings and data, nonetheless, you should still backup before doing an upgrade just to be safe.

TTUL
Gary

I wasn't planning on, I could make a new empty partition, but how do I but my backup files in it?

taurus
November 14th, 2008, 10:15 PM
If you have a new empty partition and you want to be able to write to it, the easiest way is to change the ownership of that directory from root to to your login name. Then, you can write to it anytime you want without using sudo/gksudo.

Where do you mount that new partition and what is the filesystem of it?


cat /etc/fstab
mount

JumpForJoy
November 15th, 2008, 01:16 AM
If you have a new empty partition and you want to be able to write to it, the easiest way is to change the ownership of that directory from root to to your login name. Then, you can write to it anytime you want without using sudo/gksudo.

Where do you mount that new partition and what is the filesystem of it?


cat /etc/fstab
mount

I don't have an empty partition, but I can make one.(should I) How do I change the ownership of a partition? What's fstab? What does mounting do? I'm a newbie, thanks.