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View Full Version : [ubuntu] [SOLVED] Please help me to take ownership of my "HOME" folder



tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 03:35 AM
I eventually upgraded from 7.04 to 8.04 last night. I made two partitions on a HD, 20GB for system files and the rest for my HOME.

When booting up I get this message ;

Users $HOME/.dmrc file is being ignored. This prevents the default session and language from being saved. File should be owned by user and have 644 permissions. Users $HOME directory must be owned by user and not writeable by others.

I can't customize my main menu, neither can I reinstall my applications by using "dpkg --set-selections < installed-software" - all for the same reason I believe.

I really need things explaining in the simplest of manners. Thanks for the help.

taurus
November 9th, 2008, 03:39 AM
Try


sudo chown -R username:username /home/username
sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
sudo chmod 600 /home/username/.dmrc
Replace username with your actual login name.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 03:44 AM
Try


sudo chown -R username:username /home/username
sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
sudo chmod 600 /home/username/.dmrc
Replace username with your actual login name.

result of command line 1 is;

dad@dad-desktop:~$ sudo chown -R dad:dad /home/dad
[sudo] password for dad:
chown: cannot access `/home/dad/.gvfs': Permission denied

cariboo
November 9th, 2008, 03:50 AM
chown: cannot access `/home/dad/.gvfs': Permission denied

Thats normal.

Jim

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 03:54 AM
Thats normal.

Jim

How can I change that?

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 04:18 AM
Try


sudo chown -R username:username /home/username
sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
sudo chmod 600 /home/username/.dmrc
Replace username with your actual login name.

Further results;

dad@dad-desktop:~$ sudo chmod -R /home/dad
chmod: missing operand after `/home/dad'
Try `chmod --help' for more information.

dad@dad-desktop:~$ sudo chmod 600 /home/dad/.dmrc
dad@dad-desktop:~$

I'm lost.

bettlebrox
November 9th, 2008, 04:31 AM
Try


sudo chown -R username:username /home/username
sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
sudo chmod 600 /home/username/.dmrc
Replace username with your actual login name.

>sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
Don't do that! This will change permissions on every directory AND file in your home directory and most regular files shouldn't have the execute bit set.

>sudo chmod 600 /home/username/.dmrc[/code]
Nope to that too ... you want to do "chmod 644 /home/dad/.dmrc" as the warning says:


Users $HOME/.dmrc file is being ignored. This prevents the default session and language from being saved. File should be owned by user and have 644 permissions.

Can you issue this command on the .dmrc file and post the output:


ls -l /home/dad/.dmrc

It will show what the permissions and ownership of the file are.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 04:38 AM
>sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
Don't do that! This will change permissions on every directory AND file in your home directory and most regular files shouldn't have the execute bit set.

>sudo chmod 600 /home/username/.dmrc[/code]
Nope to that too ... you want to do "chmod 644 /home/dad/.dmrc" as the warning says:


Users $HOME/.dmrc file is being ignored. This prevents the default session and language from being saved. File should be owned by user and have 644 permissions.

Can you issue this command on the .dmrc file and post the output:


ls -l /home/dad/.dmrc

It will show what the permissions and ownership of the file are.

:shock: but I already did both!!

dad@dad-desktop:~$ ls -l /home/dad/.dmrc
-rw------- 1 dad dad 26 2007-11-21 12:43 /home/dad/.dmrc

m_l17
November 9th, 2008, 06:01 AM
dad@dad-desktop:~$ ls -l /home/dad/.dmrc
-rw------- 1 dad dad 26 2007-11-21 12:43 /home/dad/.dmrc

That's the correct permissions for that file.


>sudo chmod -R 755 /home/username
Don't do that! This will change permissions on every directory AND file in your home directory and most regular files shouldn't have the execute bit set.


The above is correct. Always be careful with the -R option. I'm not 100% sure, but that should not affect much.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 09:28 AM
I eventually upgraded from 7.04 to 8.04 last night. I made two partitions on a HD, 20GB for system files and the rest for my HOME.

When booting up I get this message ;

Users $HOME/.dmrc file is being ignored. This prevents the default session and language from being saved. File should be owned by user and have 644 permissions. Users $HOME directory must be owned by user and not writeable by others.

I can't customize my main menu, neither can I reinstall my applications by using "dpkg --set-selections < installed-software" - all for the same reason I believe.

I really need things explaining in the simplest of manners. Thanks for the help.

I wonder if there's anyone around at this time of day that may be able to help me out, so ............. bump :confused:

m_l17
November 9th, 2008, 10:31 AM
Post the output of:


ls -la /home/

should look like this:


drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 4096 2008-10-31 06:38 .

drwxr-xr-x 22 root root 4096 2008-11-01 03:21 ..

drwxr-xr-x 2 ftp nogroup 4096 2008-10-31 06:38 ftp

drwx------ 2 root root 16384 2008-10-31 03:13 lost+found

drwxr-xr-x 35 ml ml 4096 2008-11-09 04:07 ml

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Post the output of:


ls -la /home/

dad@dad-desktop:~$ ls -la /home/
total 28
drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 2008-11-07 21:22 .
drwxr-xr-x 21 root root 4096 2008-11-08 20:38 ..
drwxrwxrwx 96 dad dad 4096 2008-11-09 10:30 dad
drwx------ 2 root root 16384 2008-11-07 21:14 lost+found

Can anyone help me out here? I'm desperate to get my system up and running again.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 10:13 PM
Perhaps I should go through the whole formatting, re-installation, copy HOME backup etc etc again and hope for better luck next time around??

drs305
November 9th, 2008, 10:28 PM
What exactly do you need help with at present? Although running the chmod -R 755 command is not the best way to go, it probably hasn't done irreparable 'damage' to the way your system operates.

If it is the customizing menus we can deal with that next.

Please feel free to PM me if you prefer that method.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 10:31 PM
What exactly do you need help with at present? Although running the chmod 755 command is not the best way to go, it probably hasn't done irreparable 'damage' to the way your system operates.

Please feel free to PM me if you prefer that method.

I still have exactly the same problem as in my original post. Although now I'm even more worried about having possibly made the situation worse by doing stuff that I was advised to do in this thread.

drs305
November 9th, 2008, 10:33 PM
I just posted a tutorial on your situation over in the Tutorials section. Here is the link:
Solving .dmrc and $HOME Permission Errors (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=976610)

If that doesn't cover it post back or PM me.

mapes12
November 9th, 2008, 10:40 PM
I hate to ask such a stupid question but: Did you backup /home before embarking on the upgrade.............Ouch!:shock:

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 10:46 PM
I just posted a tutorial on your situation over in the Tutorials section. Here is the link:
Solving .dmrc and $HOME Permission Errors (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=976610)

If that doesn't cover it post back or PM me.

That has solved the error message while logging in. I'm going to try to reinstall my programs now.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 10:50 PM
I hate to ask such a stupid question but: Did you backup /home before embarking on the upgrade.............Ouch!:shock:

Yes I did, thank heavens :) I even had a backup of the HOME backup (very fortunately because somehow or other I destroyed my backup HD - and there went all my photos and music from the past few years :( )

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 11:05 PM
I just posted a tutorial on your situation over in the Tutorials section. Here is the link:
Solving .dmrc and $HOME Permission Errors (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=976610)

If that doesn't cover it post back or PM me.

Your error fix worked perfectly. Heartfelt thanks to you.

I tried to reinstall my programs using "dpkg --set-selections < installed-software" in the terminal. The response was "dpkg: operation requires read/write access to dpkg status area". Would you be able to help?

drs305
November 9th, 2008, 11:08 PM
Importing the selections from a file requires administrative powers. Run the command preceded with "sudo". (Also make sure you are in the folder with the selections file or provide the full path.)

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 11:19 PM
Importing the selections from a file requires administrative powers. Run the command preceded with "sudo". (Also make sure you are in the folder with the selections file or provide the full path.)

I used this procedure http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=261366 to create the file "installed-software"

This is a history of my actions from the past few minutes;

dad@dad-desktop:~$ sudo dpkg --set-selections < installed-software
[sudo] password for dad:
dad@dad-desktop:~$ cd home
bash: cd: home: No such file or directory
dad@dad-desktop:~$ cd /home
dad@dad-desktop:/home$ sudo dpkg --set-selections < installed-software
bash: installed-software: No such file or directory

Why would the file not be recognized?

drs305
November 9th, 2008, 11:26 PM
To get to your home folder, use "cd $HOME". If the file is on your desktop, the command would be "cd $HOME/Desktop".

If you run the "ls" command in terminal right before you run the command do you see a listing for "installed-software"? If not, you are not in the correct directory - i.e. you may or may not be in your Home or Home/Desktop folder, but you aren't in the same directory as the file you are trying to use (installed-software).

If you don't know where 'installed-software' is, run:

sudo find / -type f -iname 'installed-software'

Added: Also, note that to change into your home the traditional command would be " cd /home/yourusername". Under /home, there could be lots of users (/home/bob, /home/jane, etc) and even if there are not the /home area is owned by root.

tahitiwibble
November 9th, 2008, 11:53 PM
To get to your home folder, use "cd $HOME". If the file is on your desktop, the command would be "cd $HOME/Desktop".

If you run the "ls" command in terminal right before you run the command do you see a listing for "installed-software"? If not, you are not in the correct directory - i.e. you may or may not be in your Home or Home/Desktop folder, but you aren't in the same directory as the file you are trying to use (installed-software).

If you don't know where 'installed-software' is, run:

sudo find / -type f -iname 'installed-software'

Added: Also, note that to change into your home the traditional command would be " cd /home/yourusername". Under /home, there could be lots of users (/home/bob, /home/jane, etc) and even if there are not the /home area is owned by root.

You solved my problems! Thank you!