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mazato
October 2nd, 2008, 07:04 PM
Last night, my cousin was talking about his integrated GPS in cellphone. He told me that last week his bill went up a lot. I asked him why?! he said because when you use your GPS they charge you by how many kilowatts you use...
I laughed, and told hime that the word was kilobits/bytes.

Heinzelotto
October 2nd, 2008, 07:06 PM
receiving gps signals does not cost money: http://www.gps-basics.com/faq/q0112.shtml

billgoldberg
October 2nd, 2008, 07:07 PM
Last night, my cousin was talking about his integrated GPS in cellphone. He told me that last week his bill went up a lot. I asked him why?! he said because when you use your GPS they charge you by how many kilowatts you use...
I laughed, and told hime that the word was kilobits/bytes.

Just watched an episode of "That '70s show" where Leo and Hyde were in the car and were pulled over.

Leo said "What's up ociffer".

I was laughing out loud.

DrMega
October 2nd, 2008, 07:09 PM
Last night, my cousin was talking about his integrated GPS in celphone. He told me that last week his bill went up a lot. I asked him why?! he said because when you use your GPS they charge you by how many kilowatts you use...
I laughed, and told hime that the word was kilobits/bytes.

That's not a mispronunciation, its just the wrong word in the context, but I know what you mean.

When I used to study electronics, my dad asked me what I was doing one time when I was trying to repair a faulty colour TV. I was proceeding with extreme caution as I removed the HT cable from the tube, with my left hand behind my back (for safety reasons, if you take a shock you don't want to make a circuit through your heart).

I told my dad that there was a stored charge there of around 25 kilovolts, which makes it extremely dangerous. Stunned by that, he warned me "be very careful son, that means it can kill you 25 times over". He thought kilovolts was killer volts:)

LaRoza
October 2nd, 2008, 07:26 PM
'Cthulhu' as pronounced by my niece when she was one year old.

Why did she say it? Because I had given her this and it was my goal to get her to say it: http://www.amazon.com/Mini-Cthulhu-Plush-TOY-HP004/dp/B0006FUAD6/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=toys-and-games&qid=1222971928&sr=8-2

lys1123
October 2nd, 2008, 07:29 PM
Years ago when I worked at Blockbuster a monster movie came out called "Lake Placid." It was all I could do to keep from laughing in the face of the many customers who asked me if we had "Lake Flaccid."

TheOrangePeanut
October 2nd, 2008, 07:38 PM
Cafeteria worker: "Should we go to the liberry?"
Janitor: "Li-brary. It's pronounced li-brary."
*something happens, janitor gets made*
Cafeteria worker: "Your face is as red as a strawbrary."

It's from Scrubs, but it made me lmao.

joninkrakow
October 2nd, 2008, 08:49 PM
I'm an avid reader--grew up reading heavily, and had a large vocabulary, but created my own way of pronouncing "new" words, that often stuck with me for many years. Somehow, whenever I read the word "spatial" I never equated it with the word I had heard--"space-ial". One day in class, I pronounced it "spat-ee-el", and practically got laughed out of the classroom. ;-)

Several years later, dating my now-wife, she did the exact same thing--said "spat-ee-el". She's a borderline genius, if not genuine (albeit it not card-carrying), so it made me feel really good to know I wasn't alone in this mistake. ;-)

-Jon

uberdonkey5
October 2nd, 2008, 08:52 PM
'Cthulhu' as pronounced by my niece when she was one year old.

Why did she say it? Because I had given her this and it was my goal to get her to say it: http://www.amazon.com/Mini-Cthulhu-Plush-TOY-HP004/dp/B0006FUAD6/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=toys-and-games&qid=1222971928&sr=8-2

that is so freaky! lol

I remember when I was a kid a friend of my father tried to convince me that 'Michigan' was a rude word, p.s. I am not from the US! (and I did pronounce it correctly)

Edinburgh and loughbrough are my favourite places for foreigners to say, cos they say edinburg, instead of edin-burruh', and lou-brou, instead of luff-burruh.

pp.
October 2nd, 2008, 09:05 PM
My son insisted for several years on calling elephants dahl-ice. You have to know that our native language is German (kind of), and there's no word in German even remotely sounding like that.

After some research, I detected and/or remembered following facts:

He started using that word somewhen in December.
At that time, he could not pronounce several combinations of consonants.
In the same month he pronounced 'Claus' (our local name for Santa Claus) as dahl-ows.
In a manner of reverse engineering, I supposed that he meant 'Glais' when he said dahl-ice.
'Glais' happens to be a perfectly reasonable word in our dialect of German. In normal German it would be 'kleines' (for English 'little').
I remember showing him a little wooden elephant and telling him something of the form "That's an elephant, a little one".

Conclusion:
For several years after that, all elephants (in the Zoo, in toy shops and wherever) were to him "little ones".

y@w
October 2nd, 2008, 09:07 PM
My favorite is probably clients trying to say Firefox.

So far I've gotten Fireyfox and Foxfire that I remember.

mdebusk
October 2nd, 2008, 09:14 PM
I laughed, and told hime that the word was kilobits/bytes.

That isn't a mispronunciation, it's a malapropism (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malapropism).

I was once walking a lady to her car and she told me that she hated walking alone in town after dark. She said she felt "comprehensive". (She meant "apprehensive".) :D

My mom once told me she'd bought an "osculating" fan. (She meant "oscillating".) The mental picture THAT one conjured up was spooky.

Kingsley
October 2nd, 2008, 09:15 PM
The funniest I've ever heard is some little girl trying to say "sparkling wiggles." Look it up on Youtube.

In a game I used to play, some people actually thought RuneScape is pronounced Run Escape.

SomeGuyDude
October 2nd, 2008, 09:23 PM
I went to school with a kid who was incapable of saying "kumquat". For some reason his brain didn't make the word. We discovered this while doing a scene from The Fantasticks and he had to say "You’re clipping my kumquat!" It came out variously as:

- You're clipping my kumgrad!

- You're clipping my kamquat!

- You're clipping my kumkrat!

And so on.

empty_spaces
October 2nd, 2008, 09:59 PM
I live and work in the US, but was not born there, and I always wonder why many americans pronounce the word "nuclear" as "nu-cu-lar". Anyone care to explain?

Nano Geek
October 2nd, 2008, 10:07 PM
I live and work in the US, but was not born there, and I always wonder why many americans pronounce the word "nuclear" as "nu-cu-lar". Anyone care to explain?I don't know. I guess for the same reason that we pronounce colonel as kernel.
It's just one of those things.

chucky chuckaluck
October 2nd, 2008, 10:51 PM
not exactly on topic, but a friend of mine once pointed to a book on swaziland and said "oh ****, look how they spelt switzerland."

Antar Hydrus
October 2nd, 2008, 10:54 PM
A friend of mine was doing tech support for an ISP and a guy called in asking how he could set up his "Lin-skee rooter" (Linksys Router)

myusername
October 2nd, 2008, 11:17 PM
in alabama we have a grocery store named publix (pronounced publics) but i know many people who pronounce it pube licks

Paqman
October 2nd, 2008, 11:31 PM
I guess for the same reason that we pronounce colonel as kernel.


Er, colonel is pronounced the same as kernel.

It's lieutenant that you lot pronounce wrong. It should be (bizarrely) lef-ten-ant in English. Loo-ten-ant is French.

empty_spaces
October 2nd, 2008, 11:33 PM
I've heard a lot of people say "Chi-pol-te" instead of the correct "Chi-pot-le"
I love Chipotle. Maybe I'll start a Chipotle thread.

forrestcupp
October 2nd, 2008, 11:44 PM
'Cthulhu' as pronounced by my niece when she was one year old.

Why did she say it? Because I had given her this and it was my goal to get her to say it: http://www.amazon.com/Mini-Cthulhu-Plush-TOY-HP004/dp/B0006FUAD6/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=toys-and-games&qid=1222971928&sr=8-2

That's dirty. Why would you curse a little girl like that? :)


My mother-in-law was reading something aloud that was supposed to be, "Alas, my daughter." But she pronounced it, "Alice, my daughter." I started laughing and told her I didn't know her name was Alice.

She also pronounces toilet "torlet", and wash "warsh"

My wife's aunt pronounces a nearby city, Shelbyville "Chevy-ville"

My wife isn't like her family. :)

Nano Geek
October 2nd, 2008, 11:49 PM
Er, colonel is pronounced the same as kernel.

It's lieutenant that you lot pronounce wrong. It should be (bizarrely) lef-ten-ant in English. Loo-ten-ant is French.Well, the Frenchies helped us out in '76, so we though that we would do them a favor by using their pronunciation. :)

But I was saying that colonel doesn't look like it is pronounced at all. Just like nuclear.

lisati
October 2nd, 2008, 11:54 PM
We were having a discussion in our house several years ago. The subject of patience came up, and the lady of the house accidentally came up with the classic "Patience is a virgin" - it struck me as being extremely profound.

Another thing I sometimes notice on the TV, is when people say something like "I aksed him...." instead of "I asked him...." It almost sounds like they wanted to have a go at the person with an ax(e); depending on the circumstances, it can be the source of some unintentional humour.

lisati
October 2nd, 2008, 11:57 PM
I live and work in the US, but was not born there, and I always wonder why many americans pronounce the word "nuclear" as "nu-cu-lar". Anyone care to explain?

Could it be that there is an unconscious connection with the idea of a "new killer"?

kittywittys
October 2nd, 2008, 11:59 PM
umm....this one was done by me......i was about 8 years old. I was playing dr. robnics lean bean machine game for sega (old school, i know) so the third person you battle has these tentacles that move when he wins. well i got really mad and i said "i'm going to win, i'm going to fry his testicles off.":oops: At the time i didn't know what i said.....now i know......

Frak
October 3rd, 2008, 12:00 AM
Nuclear

I live in Oklahoma, so people say Nuke-oo-lar. Something like "Those darn'd commies (many people here think Russia is still communist) are gunna shoot a nukular bomb at us..."

Dog-eat-dog-world

Many people think this is "Doggy-dog-world", well, sorry to break the news to you...

For all intents and purposes

Not, "For all intensive purposes".

Ozor Mox
October 3rd, 2008, 12:10 AM
I find the way that Americans say 'vehicle' very strange!

Also I know it isn't mispronunciation, but when people say 'irregardless' it amuses me somewhat!

mdebusk
October 3rd, 2008, 05:57 AM
I live and work in the US, but was not born there, and I always wonder why many americans pronounce the word "nuclear" as "nu-cu-lar". Anyone care to explain?

That particular sequence of phonemes is extremely rare in English, and most speakers of any language (but especially English) tend to go with what's easier (working with habits and muscle memory) rather than what's correct. I had to think of it as "new clear" to get it right.

It's similar to why we have trouble with "Cthulu". It's rare in English words for a glottal stop (g, k, hard c) to be followed immediately by a linguadental fricative (th). We say it all the time, though, in sentences like "I think Thursday would work for me" and "He wears big thick glasses".

As a language geek, it bugs me to hear people say "prolly" when they mean "probably". (It bugs me even more when I hear myself do it.) I've heard a few people actually say "prah-ee" and I wanted to ask them to take the marbles out of their mouths. But I lost it when I actually saw someone spell it "prolly". Even a descriptivist has standards. :)

I hereby publicly admit that when I read the word "linux" I think "ly-nux"... but I make a point of saying "lin-nux" out loud, so I get one-half of a geek point.

Giant Speck
October 3rd, 2008, 06:49 AM
preface

You don't think about it, but you see this word at the beginning of many books. However, you rarely have to say it out loud.

It isn't pronounced [prē-fās], but [prĕ-fĭs].

primer

This word has two meanings.

- If you mean an instructional guide, then say [prĭ-mər].
- If you mean something you apply before a base coat of paint, then say [prī-mər].

mischievous

This word only has three syllables, not four, and is pronounced [mĭs-chĕ-vŭs], not [mĭs-chē-vē-ŭs]

nuptial

This word is pronounced [nŭp-chəl], not [nŭp-ū-əl]

lisati
October 3rd, 2008, 06:56 AM
umm....this one was done by me......i was about 8 years old. I was playing dr. robnics lean bean machine game for sega (old school, i know) so the third person you battle has these tentacles that move when he wins. well i got really mad and i said "i'm going to win, i'm going to fry his testicles off.":oops: At the time i didn't know what i said.....now i know......

That reminds me of one I came up with in my younger days. While "tending to business" in the "little room" I was taking a while, so my Dad asked me what I was doing. What I meant to say was "Sitting on the seat", but it kinda came out wrong, and I unintentionally put myself in a position precariously close to having my mouth washed out with soap.....

vishzilla
October 3rd, 2008, 07:12 AM
Some people here called Desktop Dek-stop :lolflag:

Ms_Angel_D
October 3rd, 2008, 07:15 AM
umm....this one was done by me......i was about 8 years old. I was playing dr. robnics lean bean machine game for sega (old school, i know) so the third person you battle has these tentacles that move when he wins. well i got really mad and i said "i'm going to win, i'm going to fry his testicles off." At the time i didn't know what i said.....now i know......


That reminds me of one I came up with in my younger days. While "tending to business" in the "little room" I was taking a while, so my Dad asked me what I was doing. What I meant to say was "Sitting on the seat", but it kinda came out wrong, and I unintentionally put myself in a position precariously close to having my mouth washed out with soap.....


Ohh Man those both remind me of this time when I was like 15 and My mom worked at gas station around the corner from the house. So there she was waiting on customers and I was talking about some acne problems I was having (as all teenagers have), and I said to her (right in front of 3 male customers)

I need to go see a gynecologist, When what I meant to say was dermatologist... :oops::oops: Talk about being embarrassed.

mdebusk
October 3rd, 2008, 07:21 AM
in alabama we have a grocery store named publix (pronounced publics) but i know many people who pronounce it pube licks

Remember the old Bugs Bunny cartoon where he ran for mayor in opposition to Yosemite Sam? Its title was "Public Hare." I won't tell you what I thought it said when I read it, but I'll say I was really curious as to the plot.

mdebusk
October 3rd, 2008, 07:29 AM
Another thing I sometimes notice on the TV, is when people say something like "I aksed him...." instead of "I asked him...."

Strange but true: both pronunciations are legitimate, though "asked" is the standard. In older modern English, you'll find each spelling as often as the other.

Trail
October 3rd, 2008, 08:22 AM
I personally use "prolly" quite often, on purpose, as a shorthand for probably. Depending on the context.

fuzzyk.k
October 3rd, 2008, 08:40 AM
when i was young i had a hard time pronouncing certificate , used to say cerfificate

bufsabre666
October 3rd, 2008, 10:17 AM
I personally use "prolly" quite often, on purpose, as a shorthand for probably. Depending on the context.

i use prolly all the time if you look at some of my other post on this forum. but only when typing, i say probably and pidgin auto corrects it to probably so you wouldnt notice on an im

earthpigg
October 3rd, 2008, 10:24 AM
an ex of mine, when she was a kid, thought her mother worked at a place called "bofa". the mother actually worked at "bank of america", which was abbreviated "B of A" often.

zxscooby
October 3rd, 2008, 10:40 AM
My GF was reading a book aloud in the car when she pronounced
omnipotent om-nee-poe-tent.

forrestcupp
October 3rd, 2008, 02:08 PM
Why do some people put an 'L' in chimney and pronounce it "chimley"?

Why do grown adults that don't have speech impediments say things like "Happy berfday" and "I live on da erf"?

And it's not a mispronounced word, but why do people think that it's always proper to use the subjective 'I' whenever you are talking about more than one person? An example would be, "Would you like to go to the movies with Sarah and I?" You wouldn't say, "Would you like to go to the movies with I?", would you? Bad grammar doesn't irritate me unless they're trying to be proper.

Also, I now have slightly less of a problem when I see people write "prolly" now that I know that they don't really think that's what the word is.

Canis familiaris
October 3rd, 2008, 02:11 PM
Towards prounched TOORWARDS by /me

And

Burgler pronouced as BURGULAR by /me

lukjad007
October 3rd, 2008, 02:34 PM
I'm an avid reader--grew up reading heavily, and had a large vocabulary, but created my own way of pronouncing "new" words, that often stuck with me for many years.

I cannot quote specific examples, as there are to many to count. I read, but I don't speak the words I read as much as I type them. So I come up with my own... "unique" ways of saying them.

On a side note, I also "know too much" so I say things that are correct and not rude and people misinterpret them. For example, the words Eskimo and ignorant. I know these are not insulting terms at all, at least not etymologically nor by definition. But people have a stigma about certain words. So the only people I can talk to are those who know me to be someone who is polite and who wait for me to explain myself before yelling at me. ;)

This in turn leads to me not talking to as many people, or talking to many, but with simple words, thereby limiting my learning of the correct pronunciation of words. And since my English teacher is not English, and speaks Spanish better than English, I have no help there either. :D

Oh well. C'est la vie!

jasper.davidson
October 3rd, 2008, 03:39 PM
When I was a teenager, there was a rock duo that maybe some of you might possibly remember: Hall & Oates. Problem was, I heard their names mentioned on the radio, but I never saw their names in print. So I was with my friends talking about songs we liked, and I said "Have any of you heard the new song by Hauling Oats?" There was total silence for about 3 seconds when all heads turned to me, and then everyone broke out in uncontrollable laughter... and I was red as a beet. :oops:

I never did live that one down; even a few years later, my friends would sometimes tease me by saying "so how many oats have you hauled today?"

lukjad007
October 3rd, 2008, 03:55 PM
So THAT's what they are called. I thought it was Hall Of Notes.

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 05:52 PM
that is so freaky! lol

I remember when I was a kid a friend of my father tried to convince me that 'Michigan' was a rude word, p.s. I am not from the US! (and I did pronounce it correctly)


It is a neat toy. I initially bought it for myself (see comments on the amazon page), but gave it to her because having a baby in the family with it would be cooler than me with it.


That's dirty. Why would you curse a little girl like that? :)

I got her chanting this now: Ia Ia Cthulhu Fhtagn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mN6SbvI3c0&feature=related


I find the way that Americans say 'vehicle' very strange!


How do they say it?


That particular sequence of phonemes is extremely rare in English, and most speakers of any language (but especially English) tend to go with what's easier (working with habits and muscle memory) rather than what's correct. I had to think of it as "new clear" to get it right.

It's similar to why we have trouble with "Cthulu". It's rare in English words for a glottal stop (g, k, hard c) to be followed immediately by a linguadental fricative (th). We say it all the time, though, in sentences like "I think Thursday would work for me" and "He wears big thick glasses".


Another lover of language?

Towards prounched TOORWARDS by /me

And

Burgler pronouced as BURGULAR by /me

Do you have an accent?

Ozor Mox
October 3rd, 2008, 06:06 PM
How do they say it?

Like, "vea-ehicle" (more like how it is written I suppose), instead of "vearcall" which is how it's said in the UK. It's really hard to explain in words!

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 06:35 PM
Like, "vea-ehicle" (more like how it is written I suppose), instead of "vearcall" which is how it's said in the UK. It's really hard to explain in words!

That isn't a problem. It has to do with the British accent (and probably others). The American way of saying it is without an accent.

Ms_Angel_D
October 3rd, 2008, 06:41 PM
How do they say it?

Two Different pronunciations you can listen to HERE (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vehicle)

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 06:51 PM
Two Different pronunciations you can listen to HERE (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vehicle)

WAV...

I use Linux.

mdebusk
October 3rd, 2008, 06:56 PM
I personally use "prolly" quite often, on purpose, as a shorthand for probably. Depending on the context.

Well... like I said, I do it myself, even though it bugs me to hear it. Elision is a perfectly normal, even healthy, way for language to evolve. In a generation or two, most people will say "prolly" and wonder why it's spelled "probably", just like we do now with "Wednesday".

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 06:59 PM
Well... like I said, I do it myself, even though it bugs me to hear it. Elision is a perfectly normal, even healthy, way for language to evolve. In a generation or two, most people will say "prolly" and wonder why it's spelled "probably", just like we do now with "Wednesday".

Odin's Day (Germanic form, Wodin)

Ms_Angel_D
October 3rd, 2008, 07:04 PM
WAV...

I use Linux.

hmmmm I'm guessing you don't have those codecs installed then I could hear them just fine.

Anyway it sounds like it's pronounced either vea-cul or ve-hic-ul

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 07:43 PM
hmmmm I'm guessing you don't have those codecs installed then I could hear them just fine.

No, I am a free format fanatic and refuse to listen to them. (Actually, I am not, but I didn't think to install those formats and the site isn't being nice about downloading them to listen)

Ozor Mox
October 3rd, 2008, 07:46 PM
That isn't a problem. It has to do with the British accent (and probably others). The American way of saying it is without an accent.

I didn't say it was wrong, just that it sounds odd to British people.

forrestcupp
October 3rd, 2008, 07:51 PM
I got her chanting this now: Ia Ia Cthulhu Fhtagn http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mN6SbvI3c0&feature=related
You do know that one isn't responsible for the wrath of the Cthulhu until one learns about them, don't you? Ignorance is bliss.

And by the way, that guy has a beautiful voice. :)


In a generation or two, most people will say "prolly" and wonder why it's spelled "probably", just like we do now with "Wednesday".What about "February"?

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 07:57 PM
Ignorance is bliss.

To put it in the words of the master:


The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.



And by the way, that guy has a beautiful voice. :)

He does. Dani is a very good singer and has wide range and good control. The style he typically uses in Cradle makes most people think he isn't good, but you try to sing like that ;)



What about "February"?

What about it? It is a fine month.

brookswm
October 3rd, 2008, 08:04 PM
I'm an avid reader--grew up reading heavily, and had a large vocabulary, but created my own way of pronouncing "new" words, that often stuck with me for many years. Somehow, whenever I read the word "spatial" I never equated it with the word I had heard--"space-ial". One day in class, I pronounced it "spat-ee-el", and practically got laughed out of the classroom. ;-)

Several years later, dating my now-wife, she did the exact same thing--said "spat-ee-el". She's a borderline genius, if not genuine (albeit it not card-carrying), so it made me feel really good to know I wasn't alone in this mistake. ;-)

-Jon

I did that too, until recently as a matter of fact.

Denestria
October 3rd, 2008, 08:06 PM
umm....this one was done by me......i was about 8 years old. I was playing dr. robnics lean bean machine game for sega (old school, i know) so the third person you battle has these tentacles that move when he wins. well i got really mad and i said "i'm going to win, i'm going to fry his testicles off.":oops: At the time i didn't know what i said.....now i know......

My friend did the exact same thing when I was kid. When were playing Mario on Super Nintendo and were on one of the underwater swimming levels where there is an octopus. He told me to "watch out for their testicles!" My much old sister was in the room at the time and I thought she was going to hurt herself laughing. Even though it was 15? years ago you can still mention this to her and she will laugh herself red in the face.

My parents say all kinds of funny things, they grew up in the south (US).
hurricane - hairacane
eyelashes - eyelashers
fire - far
Italian - eyetalian

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 08:06 PM
I'm an avid reader--grew up reading heavily, and had a large vocabulary, but created my own way of pronouncing "new" words, that often stuck with me for many years. Somehow, whenever I read the word "spatial" I never equated it with the word I had heard--"space-ial". One day in class, I pronounced it "spat-ee-el", and practically got laughed out of the classroom. ;-)


That is actually very common. I also am an avid reader (as are other people in my family), and I have a large vocabularly, but often times how to say the word I don't know.

TravisNewman
October 3rd, 2008, 08:10 PM
That isn't a problem. It has to do with the British accent (and probably others). The American way of saying it is without an accent.
On the contrary, if you mean accent in general, it's not that we don't have an accent, it's that we have an American accent :)

However, if you mean the accent placed on the syllables of the word then I see what you mean. Many here say it with accent on VE and HI, but the British English way of saying it sounds like the accent is on VE only.

mdebusk
October 3rd, 2008, 08:10 PM
Another lover of language?

Definitely. :)

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 08:14 PM
On the contrary, if you mean accent in general, it's not that we don't have an accent, it's that we have an American accent :)

However, if you mean the accent placed on the syllables of the word then I see what you mean. Many here say it with accent on VE and HI, but the British English way of saying it sounds like the accent is on VE only.

No, I mean American is normal. It has more speakers. The fact that it originated in the UK is unimportant, as all languages move around like that.


Definitely. :)

There are a couple of us here like that. We tend to be the sort of people that confuse others with linguistic terms...

mdebusk
October 3rd, 2008, 08:16 PM
What about "February"?

I say it "feb-ru-air-ee". :)

When I was a kid in school, I heard some kids making fun of a new kid's thick southern accent. I checked my own and figured out my accent was southern, just not thick. So I started developing a "Standard American English" or "American Broadcast English" accent, so as to avoid someone making fun of me too.

I've let it go in my old age, but lots of people thought I was going into radio work for a while.

TravisNewman
October 3rd, 2008, 08:20 PM
No, I mean American is normal. It has more speakers. The fact that it originated in the UK is unimportant, as all languages move around like that.



There are a couple of us here like that. We tend to be the sort of people that confuse others with linguistic terms...
Even if it had originated here, if you watch some of the Monty Python skits or Hugh Laurie in House, you can tell they're putting on an American accent to play the part of an American.

the unique speech patterns, inflections, choice of words, etc., that identify a particular individual: We recognized his accents immediately. She corrected me in her usual mild accents.

Just because we speak it more doesn't mean that we don't have the speech patterns, inflections, etc.

Giant Speck
October 3rd, 2008, 10:03 PM
meme

It's pronounced [mēm], not [mā-mā].

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 10:07 PM
meme

It's pronounced [mēm], not [mā-mā].

An internet mama.

Hm...

Giant Speck
October 3rd, 2008, 10:12 PM
An internet mama.

Hm...

No. The symbol ā indicates a long vowel sound, as in may-may.

The correct pronunciation of meme is not may-may, but meem.

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 10:16 PM
No. The symbol ā indicates a long vowel sound, as in may-may.

The correct pronunciation of meme is not may-may, but meem.

I know what that symbol means. I know the correct way to say is well. It was merely a visual pun.

An another word which bothers me when people mis-say it: niche.

TravisNewman
October 3rd, 2008, 10:20 PM
I know what that symbol means. I know the correct way to say is well. It was merely a visual pun.

An another word which bothers me when people mis-say it: niche.
How do you say it? I usually say it kinda like nitch, but I occasionally slip into neesh.

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 10:21 PM
How do you say it? I usually say it kinda like nitch, but I occasionally slip into neesh.

neesh. The way it is supposed to be said.

Giant Speck
October 3rd, 2008, 10:27 PM
neesh. The way it is supposed to be said.

That's strange. The Merriam-Webster online dictionary gives this:

Pronunciation:
\ˈnich also ˈnēsh or ˈnish\

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 10:35 PM
That's strange. The Merriam-Webster online dictionary gives this:

Pronunciation:
\ˈnich also ˈnēsh or ˈnish\

I was giving an informal pronounciation. Basically, not "nitch". The vowel may change depending on the local vowel conventions.

ddnev45
October 3rd, 2008, 11:47 PM
On the contrary, if you mean accent in general, it's not that we don't have an accent, it's that we have an American accent :)

However, if you mean the accent placed on the syllables of the word then I see what you mean. Many here say it with accent on VE and HI, but the British English way of saying it sounds like the accent is on VE only.

So true; and, when I (Yankee) was in Nashville, it was pointed out that I was the one with the accent -- not my southern hosts.

In response to the topic of this thread, I had a professor who could only pronounce "organism" as "orgasm".

LaRoza
October 3rd, 2008, 11:48 PM
In response to the topic of this thread, I had a professor who could only pronounce "organism" as "orgasm".

That must have been an exciting class...

ddnev45
October 4th, 2008, 01:11 AM
That must have been an exciting class...

The lecture on the role of organisms in the precipitation of base metals is one of the funniest hours I spent in college.

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 01:31 AM
The lecture on the role of organisms in the precipitation of base metals is one of the funniest hours I spent in college.

It isn't really mispronounced, but a typo, but a religious organisation once referenced "The Jews and the genitles" in a news letter.

collinp
October 4th, 2008, 01:57 AM
Probably the funniest is when my friend had something in his mouth, he tried saying tooth and it came out as toot :o.


"The Jews and the genitles"

Wow

Tux Aubrey
October 4th, 2008, 02:08 AM
Again, not an actual mispronunciation, but I am always hearing people referring to "prostrate" cancer. I guess most cancers can leave you that way eventually.

frankleeee
October 4th, 2008, 02:26 AM
I didn't read the thread so this may of already been covered.
George Bush's pronunciation of nuclear was pretty funny.

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 02:53 AM
George Bush's pronunciation of nuclear was pretty funny.

Umm.. that is nothing unique. Thousands of educated people say it that way.

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 02:55 AM
It's not exactly a mispronunciation thing, since I've never heard anyone say it out loud, but I'm sick and tired of people saying or typing "virii" instead of "viruses."

VIRII ISN'T A WORD.

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 02:56 AM
It's not exactly a mispronunciation thing, since I've never heard anyone say it out loud, but I'm sick and tired of people saying or typing "virii" instead of "viruses."

VIRII ISN'T A WORD.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virii

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 03:01 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virii

Yes, and that Wikipedia article says it, too.

Why did you post that?

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 03:08 AM
Yes, and that Wikipedia article says it, too.

Yes, I know.



Why did you post that?

Because this is the internet and I can. In other news, I posted it to give credence to your statement that virii isn't a word (at least, not following Latin or English rules).

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 03:12 AM
Yes, I know.



Because this is the internet and I can. In other news, I posted it to give credence to your statement that virii isn't a word (at least, not following Latin or English rules).

I'm sorry, I just thought you posted it to try to dispute what I was saying.

Carry on. :)

Patrick793
October 4th, 2008, 03:14 AM
My tech teacher pronounces Falcon as Folcun.

Dr Small
October 4th, 2008, 03:15 AM
I'm sorry, I just thought you posted it to try to dispute what I was saying.


The Borg are allowed to dispute with peons. Peon's are not allowed to dispute with the Borg.

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 03:18 AM
The Borg are allowed to dispute with peons. Peon's are not allowed to dispute with the Borg.

I will dispute if I want to, and there is nothing you can do to stop me.

Muahahahahaha

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 03:18 AM
I'm sorry, I just thought you posted it to try to dispute what I was saying.

Carry on. :)

Delusions of persecution :-)

Kidding. I see how it can be taken that way though, as often refutations are single links. I was actually just fulfilling your rather bold claim that is isn't a word.


The Borg are allowed to dispute with peons. Peon's are not allowed to dispute with the Borg.

Well, "dispute" is a little strong. They can try to dispute...

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 03:19 AM
Delusions of persecution :-)

Kidding. I see how it can be taken that way though, as often refutations are single links. I was actually just fulfilling your rather bold claim that is isn't a word.


That, or I'm just overly defensive sometimes.

RFXCasey
October 4th, 2008, 03:29 AM
My wife is from england. She asked my one day if I wanted some Mine Strone. I ignored her at first and she kept AXING me (that's another one). So finally I was like "What are you talking about?!!!" Then she stuck a can of minestrone soup in my face. I said it's pronouced MINA STRONE E. I think she felt pretty bad when I laughed in her face. :D

frankleeee
October 4th, 2008, 03:31 AM
Umm.. that is nothing unique. Thousands of educated people say it that way.

That may be so, but GB's vernacular prose is legendary in it's mispronunciation, and delivery. If I was the leader of a country, and part of a family worth several billion dollars I would ask for a little extra from the ye old trust fund for for a speech therapist. I would question GB's actual education and cognitive development though. I hope this is far enoigh away from a political comment to be acceptable. ;)

frankleeee
October 4th, 2008, 03:34 AM
My wife is from england. She asked my one day if I wanted some Mine Strone. I ignored her at first and she kept AXING me (that's another one). So finally I was like "What are you talking about?!!!" Then she stuck a can of minestrone soup in my face. I said it's pronouced MINA STRONE E. I think she felt pretty bad when I laughed in her face. :D

Hmmm and you feel good about this treatment of your significant other, let us know how that develops.

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 03:35 AM
That may be so, but GB's vernacular prose is legendary in it's mispronunciation, and delivery. If I was the leader of a country, and part of a family worth several billion dollars I would ask for a little extra from the ye old trust fund for for a speech therapist. I would question GB's actual education and cognitive development though. I hope this is far enoigh away from a political comment to be acceptable. ;)

Legendary because of public opinion. I don't see people doing this to anyone else, although many of their own little quirks and problems with public speaking, including Obama ;)

Anyway, if all people can make fun of a person quote-wise involves one word, then that isn't so bad.

frankleeee
October 4th, 2008, 03:44 AM
Legendary because of public opinion. I don't see people doing this to anyone else, although many of their own little quirks and problems with public speaking, including Obama ;)

Anyway, if all people can make fun of a person quote-wise involves one word, then that isn't so bad.

I could make many comments on GB without making fun of him but it is not allowed in this forum.

Actually the funniest thing I have seen lately is forum members accusing a poster on the not omgpp forum of being you in disguise, and being reverse trolled now thats some paranoia. ;)

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 03:48 AM
Actually the funniest thing I have seen lately is forum members accusing a poster on the not omgpp forum of being you in disguise, and being reverse trolled now thats some paranoia. ;)

Wow. Who things who is me?

Paqman
October 4th, 2008, 03:51 AM
It's not exactly a mispronunciation thing, since I've never heard anyone say it out loud, but I'm sick and tired of people saying or typing "virii" instead of "viruses."

VIRII ISN'T A WORD.

Here here. Annoys the bejeezus out of me. Fora as the plural of forum is equally bad. It's just cod Latin, and meaningless.

frankleeee
October 4th, 2008, 03:57 AM
Wow. Who things who is me?

I would post you a link but the behavior there in posting would not be applicable to the UF COC, it is a little sophomoric in places. It is interesting to peruse the posts to see the indignant dysfunction though.:)

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 04:01 AM
I would post you a link but the behavior there in posting would not be applicable to the UF COC, it is a little sophomoric in places. It is interesting to peruse the posts to see the indignant dysfunction though.:)

Ah, is this person using my name or something?

Out of curiosity, does this person have an obvious gender or are they playing that game too?

frankleeee
October 4th, 2008, 04:11 AM
Ah, is this person using my name or something?

Out of curiosity, does this person have an obvious gender or are they playing that game too?

Neither, the accusation I think was a joke, nobody claims to be you, although the gender thread is continued on the forum. I don't recall anybody really abusing you in comments or the UF in general, EDB has warned people to not abuse the UF. I hate to comment anymore on it anymore though, cruise through for a good grimace. All you have to due is imagine the original omgpp being moderated by a high school student, need I say more.;)

jacksaff
October 4th, 2008, 04:11 AM
I used to teach English to young kids in China. They had problems with certain English sounds that they hadn't already learned in their own language.
I used to get great mischievous enjoyment out of having 16 five year olds doing a little role play passing objects to each other. "Here you are." "Thank you." "You're welcome."
It sounded like 16 kids going "Here you are." "**** you!" "You're a wanker."

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 04:24 AM
Neither, the accusation I think was a joke, nobody claims to be you, although the gender thread is continued on the forum. I don't recall anybody really abusing you in comments or the UF in general, EDB has warned people to not abuse the UF. I hate to comment anymore on it anymore though, cruise through for a good grimace. All you have to due is imagine the original omgpp being moderated by a high school student, need I say more.;)

My worst nightmare...

I'll take your word for it.

zxscooby
October 4th, 2008, 04:27 AM
I overheard some kids at the zoo calling a peacock a poocock.

L815
October 4th, 2008, 05:18 AM
Downtown pronounced "daotao"

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 05:19 AM
Downtown pronounced "daotao"

Where?

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 05:20 AM
Where?

Downtown, most likely.

doas777
October 4th, 2008, 05:32 AM
Nuke-U-ler

I swear, anyone who says they specialize in energy, should know how to pronounce the word nuclear. Nu-Clee-ar. I certainly laughed.

Jim!
October 4th, 2008, 05:39 AM
A friend of mine is an exchange student from Sweden and pronounces the word penguen "Pinguin". :D

Giant Speck
October 4th, 2008, 05:40 AM
A friend of mine is an exchange student from Sweden and pronounces the word penguen "Pinguin". :D

One of my teachers back when I was learning Russian pronounced vowel like "wowel," which doesn't even make since because the Russian language doesn't have a w sound.

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 05:42 AM
One of my teachers back when I was learning Russian pronounced vowel like "wowel," which doesn't even make since because the Russian language doesn't have a w sound.

It is probably the difficult in saying both sounds right after one another.

zmjjmz
October 4th, 2008, 05:50 AM
I still do this, mainly because I read a lot and I don't speak much.
I pronounce router as "rauter" when it's supposed to be "rooter".
I pronounce modem as "maadem" when it's supposed to be "moudem".

LaRoza
October 4th, 2008, 06:00 AM
I still do this, mainly because I read a lot and I don't speak much.
I pronounce router as "rauter" when it's supposed to be "rooter".


The pronounciation of "router" depends on your locale, and to what it refers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_y36fG2Oba0

Occasionally Correct
October 4th, 2008, 08:31 AM
It bugged me to no end when Gutsy was released and I kept seeing "Gusty" all over the place.

Maybe that's not within the parameters of the discussion. It wasn't funny to me and I never actually heard it mispronounced. I digress! :p

Tux Aubrey
October 4th, 2008, 09:47 AM
My kids pronounce "Shitake Mushrooms" as if it had two "t"s and a hyphen between them. Not out of ignorance, I suspect.

Dr Small
October 4th, 2008, 01:01 PM
All you have to due is imagine the original Oh my gosh!pp being moderated by a high school student, need I say more.;)

That's one of the reasons I rarely visit it anymore.

lisati
October 4th, 2008, 01:10 PM
In response to the topic of this thread, I had a professor who could only pronounce "organism" as "orgasm".

A few years ago, I saw a blooper where one of our local politicians hosted a TV quiz show for teenagers (before he was a politician). The answer to the question was "organism", but the person giving the answer said "orgasm", to which the host replied "correct" and gave the team the point.

sanderella
October 4th, 2008, 04:19 PM
My mother once pronounced a funny spoonerism. When she was given a freshly shot game bird, she asked "Is it a phartridge or a peasant?" That was over 40 years ago, but the family still laughs about it.:KS

Martje_001
October 4th, 2008, 04:24 PM
Oh well, I live in the Netherlands, so I don't have anything to share, but:

Everyone keeps calling Linux Unox (http://njitsene.org/nav/melliw/snalabni/P2260308.JPG).

L815
October 4th, 2008, 04:27 PM
Where?

It was a friend of the family who speaks limited English (Portuguese decent), and adds a lot of accents to his pronunciations; on a trip to Cape Cod.

I also find myself saying lint minux (linux mint) x)

forrestcupp
October 5th, 2008, 01:07 PM
What about "February"?



What about it? It is a fine month.
Well, there are a lot of people who don't pronounce the first 'r'.



He does. Dani is a very good singer and has wide range and good control. The style he typically uses in Cradle makes most people think he isn't good, but you try to sing like that ;)I didn't say he wasn't a talented singer. I was making a sarcastic comment about the beauty of his voice. He's talented, but "beautiful" is not an adjective most people would use to describe his voice. ;)

Enthralled
October 5th, 2008, 01:25 PM
"Jean-Claude van Damme" is definitely the funniest mispronounciation I've ever heard. xD

LaRoza
October 5th, 2008, 01:38 PM
Well, there are a lot of people who don't pronounce the first 'r'.

I don't associate with such people. I have standards.



I didn't say he wasn't a talented singer. I was making a sarcastic comment about the beauty of his voice. He's talented, but "beautiful" is not an adjective most people would use to describe his voice. ;)

I am not most people.

sc0tt10
October 5th, 2008, 01:40 PM
I have heard several people refer to Linux as "Lie-nux" and Ubuntu as "Un-bun-two"

ratmandall
October 5th, 2008, 01:42 PM
Also how do you pronounce GNU??? I just spell it out.

Tomatz
October 5th, 2008, 01:48 PM
The other day i was in the local shop when my 5 year old daughter asked for a pink woffer. I was like "err whats a pink woffer"? She then pointed to a packet of pink wafers....

I peed myself :lolflag:

lukjad007
October 5th, 2008, 02:02 PM
I have heard several people refer to Linux as "Lie-nux" and Ubuntu as "Un-bun-two"
That's almost as bad as those who pronounce Linux as Lin-ux and Ubuntu as Youbuntu.

It's really Lin-OOKS and OO-boon-tOO, to my understanding.

I just say Lin-ux and OO-bun-to so that people who aren't Swedish or African don't look at me funnier than they already do.

EDIT:

I just remembered the favourate mistake I heard. My English teacher pronounces "Enunciate" as EE-NOUN-sea-ate instead of EE-NUN-sea-ate. She would criticize us on how we were not EE-NOUN-sea-ate-ing correctly. I was having a hard time trying to figure out whether to laugh or cry.

Barrucadu
October 5th, 2008, 02:45 PM
Well, there are a lot of people who don't pronounce the first 'r'.

February with a non-silent first R? That just sounds so strange to me... I've never heard anyone pronounce it differently to "feb yu ah ree" (or even "feb yu ree").

Frak
October 5th, 2008, 04:11 PM
Also how do you pronounce GNU??? I just spell it out.
GaNew

lukjad007
October 5th, 2008, 04:19 PM
Gee-En-You is how I do it.

gettinoriginal
October 5th, 2008, 05:27 PM
As a child I had problems with aluminum and cinnamon, so mom wrapped her cerinimum buns in al u mimm umnun. :redface:

LaRoza
October 5th, 2008, 05:33 PM
As a child I had problems with aluminum and cinnamon, so mom wrapped her cerinimum buns in al u mimm umnun. :redface:

Could be worse, you could pronounce it "alu-min-ium".

Dixon Bainbridge
October 5th, 2008, 05:37 PM
I'm always amazed how Americans can't even pronounce small, simple words properly, like Eye-RAK instead of ir-ak, Nye-Kon, instead of Ni-kon.

WTF??!! :)

LaRoza
October 5th, 2008, 05:44 PM
I'm always amazed how Americans can't even pronounce small, simple words properly, like Eye-RAK instead of ir-ak, Nye-Kon, instead of Ni-kon.

WTF??!! :)

I am amazed at how Englishans can't pronounce the most basic words. Many are very far off, like "french fries", which they reduce to "chips", and soccer, which they mistakenly call "football".

forrestcupp
October 6th, 2008, 12:57 PM
Could be worse, you could pronounce it "alu-min-ium".


I am amazed at how Englishans can't pronounce the most basic words. Many are very far off, like "french fries", which they reduce to "chips", and soccer, which they mistakenly call "football".Wow! You're in one of those moods. Right on, though. :)


I'm always amazed how Americans can't even pronounce small, simple words properly, like Eye-RAK instead of ir-ak, Nye-Kon, instead of Ni-kon.

WTF??!! :)What about Eye-TALian instead of i-talian? You don't pronounce Italy EYE-taly, do you?

forrestcupp
October 6th, 2008, 01:00 PM
February with a non-silent first R? That just sounds so strange to me... I've never heard anyone pronounce it differently to "feb yu ah ree" (or even "feb yu ree").

I just looked it up in the dictionary, and both ways are correct. It actually lists the silent R as the most common pronunciation.

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 02:25 PM
Wow! You're in one of those moods. Right on, though. :)

Yes I am mate.

(Tongue in cheek of course, I really don't care about the issue, except aluminum because aluminum is right and the other way is only in existance because of a nationalistic person who wanted to be "classical", whereas aluminum is the scientific term used (in the end, he had a bunch of names he tried out) by the person who isolated it. Basically, if platinum were discovered at that time, it would be called "platinium" to make it sound classical)




What about Eye-TALian instead of i-talian? You don't pronounce Italy EYE-taly, do you?

I don't say Eye-TALian. I say... no, that would be very inappropriate as a joke (even more so if it were true).

I say i-talian though.


I just looked it up in the dictionary, and both ways are correct. It actually lists the silent R as the most common pronunciation.

Most common usually means "not right".

Circus-Killer
October 6th, 2008, 02:32 PM
well, this one isn't mispronounciation, it was just the pronounciation that was funny. it involved being on irc and seeing someone by the name of Gaelic_Boy.
Cheesy, i know, but some people should think before choosing a nickname.

Canis familiaris
October 6th, 2008, 02:33 PM
I am amazed at how Englishans can't pronounce the most basic words. Many are very far off, like "french fries", which they reduce to "chips", and soccer, which they mistakenly call "football".

What?

Wait let me correct it for you...


I am amazed at how Englishans can't pronounce the most basic words. Many are very far off, like "french fries", which they reduce to "chips", and soccer, which they correctly call "football".

Dixon Bainbridge
October 6th, 2008, 02:33 PM
I am amazed at how Englishans can't pronounce the most basic words. Many are very far off, like "french fries", which they reduce to "chips", and soccer, which they mistakenly call "football".

All you need to remember is, we gave the Americans the English language, therefore, we know best.

We invented the modern game of football too. FOOTBALL.

:)

(I don't care about the issue either, apart from Nye-Kon, which irrationally bugs the hell out of me. I was in a camera shop the other day, and there was an American guy looking at a D700, and he kept saying Nye-Kon this and Nye-Kon that. I had to leave the shop and go back later).

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 02:40 PM
All you need to remember is, we gave the Americans the English language, therefore, we know best.

No, you received it from the people who invaded the island (then left, once they realised that is was "normal" weather for that area): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language#History



We invented the modern game of football too. FOOTBALL.

And took it to entirely different levels. http://www.cracked.com/article_15209_p2.html (see 1). You all even beat the Arabs with their dead goat on horses game.

Dixon Bainbridge
October 6th, 2008, 02:44 PM
No, you received it from the people who invaded the island (then left, once they realised that is was "normal" weather for that area): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language#History


Yeah, its a hybrid language, but we still gave it to you. Stop finding excuses, and start pronouncing words properly!

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 02:46 PM
Yeah, its a hybrid language, but we still gave it to you. Stop finding excuses, and start pronouncing words properly!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geordie#Geordie_dialect

American's have a much more uniform language. England has many dialects, despite being the size of my backyard. (Technically, true, as England is about the size of Pennsylvania)

Dixon Bainbridge
October 6th, 2008, 02:48 PM
Still does not excuse you from mispronouncing Nye-Kon and Eye-Rak. :)

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 02:49 PM
Still does not excuse you from mispronouncing Nye-Kon and Eye-Rak. :)

What is "Kye-Kon"?

And I don't say Iraq, I say: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fd/Ar-al_Gumhuriyah_al_Iraqiya.ogg

Tomatz
October 6th, 2008, 02:50 PM
How do you pronounce Laroza?

I pronounce it La roz ah

But a USAian may pronounce it la rose ah


HuH?

Dixon Bainbridge
October 6th, 2008, 02:51 PM
What is "Kye-Kon"?


Dunno.

Slow work day, eh? :)

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 04:14 PM
How do you pronounce Laroza?

I pronounce it La roz ah

But a USAian may pronounce it la rose ah


LaRoza (note, capital R), is said "La" + "Roza", like how most people say "rose", not like the Spanish name "LaRosa", which is an entirely different name that happens to resemble LaRoza, although they are not even of the same language family (Indo-European).

No one says "LaRosa" in person that I have heard, unless they are told the name and they mistake it.

Ub1476
October 6th, 2008, 05:29 PM
Most be all the different "Ubuntus" around.

Unbuntu
Obuntu
Ubontu
Ubonto

African languages isn't for everyone. :)

Giant Speck
October 6th, 2008, 05:50 PM
I pronounce Irak "ear-ahk" and al-Qaeda "ahl-keye-duh".

That's just how I do it. I don't care if anyone else thinks I'm saying it wrong.

lukjad007
October 6th, 2008, 06:10 PM
i pronounce irak "ear-ahk" and al-qaeda "ahl-keye-duh".

That's just how i do it. I don't care if anyone else thinks i'm saying it wrong.
YOUR WRONG!
Heh.

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 06:11 PM
your wrong!

You're wrong.

Canis familiaris
October 6th, 2008, 06:20 PM
You're wrong.
NO U R RONG. will food for code

lukjad007
October 6th, 2008, 06:26 PM
NO U R RONG. will food for code
+1 for Anuraga_panada for getting it. :D

RedMist
October 6th, 2008, 06:38 PM
I can never understand why Americans pronounce the word "route" as rowt. It should be pronounced "root".

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 06:42 PM
I can never understand why Americans pronounce the word "route" as rowt. It should be pronounced "root".

We do pronounce it both ways, depending on location and what it refers to.

paul101
October 6th, 2008, 06:46 PM
aluminium


the american way of saying it always cracks me up :lol:

RedMist
October 6th, 2008, 06:54 PM
We do pronounce it both ways, depending on location and what it refers to.

The word route refers to a way to get somewhere. Ive only ever heard Americans pronounce this as rowt. However the word rout is indeed pronounced as rowt and it refers to defeat.

Canis familiaris
October 6th, 2008, 06:57 PM
Strangely Router is pronounced as Rawter as I hear it whereas Route is pronounced as root.

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 07:00 PM
aluminium


the american way of saying it always cracks me up :lol:

We already went over this, the spelling "aluminum" is the original scientific term used by the person who isolated it. Alumunium was created after by a British person who felt it would be more classical, even though it wasn't scientific (alumina, is where aluminum was found). Thank God the Brits then didn't get their hands on platinum.

Canis familiaris
October 6th, 2008, 07:04 PM
I always spell as Aluminium.
TBH I write Al. End of the Story. :)

RedMist
October 6th, 2008, 07:13 PM
the spelling "aluminum" is the original scientific term

Incorrect. The original term was "alumium". Later it was named aluminum. Aluminium is the standard international name for the element.

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 07:19 PM
Incorrect. The original term was "alumium". Later it was named aluminum. Aluminium is the standard international name for the element.

The person who named it has a bunch of names, some of them not "alu-" anything. This person settled on Aluminum and it was so until the nationalist changed it. Because of the British Empire, it has spread.

It may be the "standard international name", but it is incorrect. The "standard international" means "just one of many and not followed by all" otherwise they wouldn't have had to make a standard.

joninkrakow
October 6th, 2008, 07:29 PM
We do pronounce it both ways, depending on location and what it refers to.

Yeah, I typically pronounce it like this, "What rowt you taking to get there? I'm taking root 66". ;-) Yes, two ways in one sentence. I think that my personal habit is root when it's a named/numbered road, and "route" if speaking in general, but I'm sure there are exceptions to my own rule of usage. ;-)

-Jon

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 07:35 PM
Also, take into consider this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English-language_vowel_changes_before_historic_r

Dixon Bainbridge
October 6th, 2008, 08:31 PM
Group hug anyone? Go on, let the funk out, let the love in...

:)

S0VERE1GN
October 6th, 2008, 08:40 PM
Governor Palin pronouncing nuclear wrong at least 60 times in the debate.

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 08:41 PM
Group hug anyone? Go on, let the funk out, let the love in...


Hippy...

pp.
October 6th, 2008, 09:49 PM
Thank God the Brits then didn't get their hands on platinum.

Just think how you would have to throw away all of you supply out of disgust at how you'd have to call it.

LaRoza
October 6th, 2008, 10:07 PM
Just think how you would have to throw away all of you supply out of disgust at how you'd have to call it.

Not at all, the USA doesn't call things other names just because a small island decided to rename it.

We'd call it Platinum, and think the British are even weirder.

(I don't have any platinum actually, either)

73ckn797
October 6th, 2008, 10:54 PM
Maybe a little off topic:

I was driving late one night when I passed a portable sign for a restaurant. It should have read "All the Catfish You Can Eat".

Someone had changed it to read "All the Catsh** You Can Eat".

I do not think that I have laughed so hard and so long since then. I still get amused when thinking about it.

Frak
October 7th, 2008, 01:11 AM
All you need to remember is, we gave the Americans the English language, therefore, we know best.

We invented the modern game of football too. FOOTBALL.

:)

(I don't care about the issue either, apart from Nye-Kon, which irrationally bugs the hell out of me. I was in a camera shop the other day, and there was an American guy looking at a D700, and he kept saying Nye-Kon this and Nye-Kon that. I had to leave the shop and go back later).
Americans speak a more pure form of English than the English do.

This is coming from a Brit.

bruce89
October 7th, 2008, 01:22 AM
Americans speak a more pure form of English than the English do.

Then what we speak in Scotland is, by the same standards, even more pure.

Anyway, any Gaelic name would be tricky.

Frak
October 7th, 2008, 01:24 AM
Then what we speak in Scotland is, by the same standards, even more pure.

Anyway, any Gaelic name would be tricky.
Aye, it is.

jamieh
October 7th, 2008, 01:28 AM
My sub math teacher pronounced "numerators" as "numinators"

Giant Speck
October 7th, 2008, 01:39 AM
The word route refers to a way to get somewhere. Ive only ever heard Americans pronounce this as rowt. However the word rout is indeed pronounced as rowt and it refers to defeat.

Please tell me you don't pronounce about "aboot."

bruce89
October 7th, 2008, 01:42 AM
Please tell me you don't pronounce about "aboot."

Scotland do.

mc4100
October 7th, 2008, 01:44 AM
Scotland do.

Only if you're a ned. ;)

bruce89
October 7th, 2008, 01:47 AM
Only if you're a ned. ;)

Heh.

Is your avatar supposed to be a subliminal message for us? (nation wise)

RedMist
October 7th, 2008, 02:04 AM
Please tell me you don't pronounce about "aboot."

:lolflag: Nope...Im not Canadian!

tikal26
October 7th, 2008, 02:08 AM
chroot whoa i don;t even know wehre to start but in everypossible way you can imagine

Helios1276
October 7th, 2008, 04:50 AM
Funniest has to be the poor tourists pronouncing our street names. In fairness though, many Irish mispronounce them too.

Bealach na Gaoithe

An Caistlean Nua

Giant Speck
October 7th, 2008, 04:53 AM
My sub math teacher pronounced "numerators" as "numinators"

I had a geography teacher that pronounced Myanmar "Malomar."

Mind you, this teacher also claimed that Tijuana was located on the shores of the Rio Grande, and that Chechnya was a province in the Ukraine (and that the Ukraine was not independent from Russia).

Tomatz
October 7th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Not at all, the USA doesn't call things other names just because a small island decided to rename it.

We'd call it Platinum, and think the British are even weirder.

(I don't have any platinum actually, either)

Jog on usashirean!

This small island is the mother, father and grandpa of yours! You ain't even got your own language (except for klingon) and you have to steal all your oil.

HA

UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK

Also you think Jam is Jello so there!

lisati
October 7th, 2008, 11:32 AM
Jog on usashirean!

This small island is the mother, father and grandpa of yours! You ain't even got your own language (except for klingon) and you have to steal all your oil.

HA

UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK

Also you think Jam is Jello so there!

Speaking from "the colonies down under", yup, they're a weird mob orright!

drokmed
October 7th, 2008, 07:07 PM
"strategery" -- George W Bush (he was on SNL skit w/ Gore)

LaRoza
October 7th, 2008, 07:51 PM
This small island is the mother, father and grandpa of yours! You ain't even got your own language (except for klingon) and you have to steal all your oil.

France, Germany and Rome are the fathers of yours. We have our own language, in fact, thousands of them (tell me, where in England would you have find a place called "Lackawanna" or "Susquehanna "?)

We don't steal oil. It is bought.



Also you think Jam is Jello so there!

It depends on where you are. Unlike the UK, the USA is large and diverse. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jam

73ckn797
October 7th, 2008, 10:33 PM
France, Germany and Rome are the fathers of yours. We have our own language, in fact, thousands of them (tell me, where in England would you have find a place called "Lackawanna" or "Susquehanna "?)

We don't steal oil. It is bought.



It depends on where you are. Unlike the UK, the USA is large and diverse. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jam

Touche


tou·ché Pronunciation: \tü-ˈshā\

LaRoza
October 7th, 2008, 10:35 PM
Touche


tou·ché Pronunciation: \tü-ˈshā\

It bugs me when French words are gravely mis-spoken...

Tomatz
October 7th, 2008, 10:47 PM
France, Germany and Rome are the fathers of yours. We have our own language, in fact, thousands of them (tell me, where in England would you have find a place called "Lackawanna" or "Susquehanna "?)

We don't steal oil. It is bought.



It depends on where you are. Unlike the UK, the USA is large and diverse. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jam

Lol you crack me up Rose ;)

I will do the manic chant Americans do when they feel isolated and insecure.

UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK.....

zzzzzZZZZZZZ

LaRoza
October 7th, 2008, 11:17 PM
Lol you crack me up Rose ;)

LaRoza. ;)



I will do the manic chant Americans do when they feel isolated and insecure.

UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK.....


We don't do that, do we?

Oh well.

73ckn797
October 7th, 2008, 11:21 PM
It bugs me when French words are gravely mis-spoken...


I have pun with words.

LaRoza
October 7th, 2008, 11:22 PM
I have pun with words.

So do I, language is a beautiful thing.

73ckn797
October 7th, 2008, 11:23 PM
UK UK UK UK UK UK UK UK.....

Do you mean YUK YUK YUK or what?

73ckn797
October 7th, 2008, 11:28 PM
So do I, language is a beatiful thing.


Do you remember Norm Crosby or Archie Campbell?

Campbell had a bit about Rindercella and Pransome Hince.

bruce89
October 8th, 2008, 12:23 AM
France, Germany and Rome are the fathers of yours. We have our own language, in fact, thousands of them (tell me, where in England would you have find a place called "Lackawanna" or "Susquehanna "?)


There's a place called Acharacle in Scotland, but that's one of the easier ones. Try Wales for place names.

LaRoza
October 8th, 2008, 12:25 AM
There's a place called Acharacle in Scotland, but that's one of the easier ones. Try Wales for place names.

I was pointing out the Native words that are found all over the USA.

It is rare that a person speaks one of those languages fluently, but their influence on English (even English as spoken in the UK!) is present.

(The two words I mentioned are rivers and counties, Scranton is in Lackawanna county)

bruce89
October 8th, 2008, 12:29 AM
I was pointing out the Native words that are found all over the USA.

It is rare that a person speaks one of those languages fluently, but their influence on English (even English as spoken in the UK!) is present.


The same can be said about Gaelic and Welsh respectively.

For instance, the village that gave its name to Strontium is Strontian; which is an anglicisation of the Gaelic Sròn an t-Sìtheinn, which means "Nose of the fairies".

LaRoza
October 8th, 2008, 12:32 AM
The same can be said about Gaelic and Welsh respectively.

For instance, the village that gave its name to Strontium is Strontian; which is an anglicisation of the Gaelic Sròn an t-Sìtheinn, which means "Nose of the fairies".

Well, that was a counter to the assertatin made earlier about them giving English to the USA.

bruce89
October 8th, 2008, 12:35 AM
Well, that was a counter to the assertatin made earlier about them giving English to the USA.

Whereas I'm trying to bore you with useless facts (there's a change).

LaRoza
October 8th, 2008, 12:38 AM
Whereas I'm trying to bore you with useless facts (there's a change).

No, it is interesting to me :-)

English is quite a language.

bruce89
October 8th, 2008, 12:42 AM
No, it is interesting to me :-)

Perhaps there was a bit of Caledonian self-deprecation in my comment.


English is quite a language.

Far too much of a language if you ask me.

LaRoza
October 8th, 2008, 12:44 AM
Far too much of a language if you ask me.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_English

73ckn797
October 8th, 2008, 01:52 AM
Perhaps there was a bit of Caledonian self-deprecation in my comment.



Far too much of a language if you ask me.

For men the English language really only needs 4 words; "Yes Dear I will"

pp.
October 8th, 2008, 06:25 AM
It bugs me when French words are gravely mis-spoken...

The French write it "touché" and say it "too-shay".

According to Mark Twain, foreigners know better how to spell than how to speak.

lisati
October 8th, 2008, 06:27 AM
For men the English language really only needs 4 words; "Yes Dear I will"

Or even two: "Yes dear"

LaRoza
October 8th, 2008, 06:28 AM
The French write it "touché" and say it "too-shay".

Yes, that is what I mean.

Although I am not a fan of French, if one is going to say the words, might as well same them correctly.

Also, German words and names (unless the bearer Anglicises the name themself) should be pronounced as German words and names. Schwarzenegger especially.

Tomatz
October 8th, 2008, 02:50 PM
For men the English language really only needs 4 words; "Yes Dear I will"

Nah

"Get on with housework"

:lolflag:

Im going to die for that comment :(

lukjad007
October 8th, 2008, 03:40 PM
Grammatically, it would be five words: "Get on with the housework."
I think that "Yes Dear." is faster, easier, and shorter than that. Also, it most likely will not get your eyeballs ripped out of their sockets if used properely. An incorrect use of this term (e.g. "Does this dress make me look fat?") can cause serious damage. In these cases you should use one of the alternate two word phrases: "Maybe Dear" and "No Dear."

forrestcupp
October 8th, 2008, 04:08 PM
An incorrect use of this term (e.g. "Does this dress make me look fat?") can cause serious damage. In these cases you should use one of the alternate two word phrases: "Maybe Dear" and "No Dear."
So you shouldn't say, "No, Dear. You make the dress look fat."?

lukjad007
October 8th, 2008, 04:11 PM
That is another incorrect use of those phrases.

EDIT: It should be mentioned that in some, even many, cases; the best response is servile silence.

lisati
October 8th, 2008, 08:51 PM
So you shouldn't say, "No, Dear. You make the dress look fat."?

Another one is "I'm sorry.(pause) I love you." but you need to be careful NOT to say "I'm sorry I love you" (without the pause) otherwise there's a real risk of World War III.

73ckn797
October 8th, 2008, 09:05 PM
Nah

"Get on with housework"

:lolflag:

Im going to die for that comment :(

Let it be remembered that Tomatz was a devoted Ubuntu Forum participant.

adamogardner
October 8th, 2008, 09:25 PM
I think other cultures speak english funny. Here are a few:
Mexicans pronounce my name 'adam' as 'air-own'
Black people sometimes mix up their 's' and 'k' so 'ask becomes 'aks'. Also I love when they add an 'es' or two to make a plural. (example: breasts become 'breastises'. I love that.
New Englanders are blind to the letter 'r' they pronounce my last name like: 'God-na'
And Texans misread the 'oi' contraction they will read 'coil' correctly but then pronounce it 'earl' when they drop the 'c' to spell 'oil'

73ckn797
October 9th, 2008, 01:56 AM
My dad used to say Atlanter instead of Atlanta.

Tomatz
October 9th, 2008, 09:28 AM
Let it be remembered that Tomatz was a devoted Ubuntu Forum participant.


:lolflag:

nothingspecial
October 9th, 2008, 12:19 PM
My brother and his wife were watching "Mr & Mrs Smith" the other night. His wife said (whilst eating a packet of crisps(chips)).

"I`m too fat, I wish I was Anjelina Jolie"

To which my brother replied without thought -

"I wish you were Anjelina Jolie"

Thats 20 years of pain he`s sentenced himself to

Back to the subject, my eldest boy used to pronounce breakfast as "breast-food"

forrestcupp
October 9th, 2008, 12:45 PM
New Englanders are blind to the letter 'r' they pronounce my last name like: 'God-na'



My dad used to say Atlanter instead of Atlanta.

Like 73ckn797 mentioned, New Englanders don't pronounce the letter 'r' unless there isn't supposed to be one there. Instead of saying "Erica is coming" they say "Ericar is coming."

MunkyJunky
October 9th, 2008, 12:50 PM
"Aluminium". I shall say no more on that one.

And there's a chain of bars in the UK owned by J.D Wetherspoon, so everyone calls it Wetherspoons, instead of whatever that particular bars name is. My mum (and others) though call it 'Witherspoons' for god knows what reason...

xlinuks
October 9th, 2008, 02:23 PM
For some reason some English ppl spell "Tiblisi" instead of "Tbilisi".

LaRoza
October 9th, 2008, 06:13 PM
For some reason some English ppl spell "Tiblisi" instead of "Tbilisi".

"Tb" is not a phoneme in english usually.

pp.
October 9th, 2008, 07:34 PM
"Tb" is not a phenome in english usually.

But then, English is not usually considered to be an organism per se.

LaRoza
October 9th, 2008, 07:40 PM
But then, English is not usually considered to be an organism per se.

Fixed. Minor vowel troubles :-)

pp.
October 9th, 2008, 07:48 PM
Fixed. Minor vowel troubles :-)

I know; always those recalcitrant phonemes.

BTW, does "Tb" in the original language represent one or two phonemes?

LaRoza
October 9th, 2008, 07:56 PM
BTW, does "Tb" in the original language represent one or two phonemes?

I was wondering that myself.

The fact that it is spelled (incorrectly) As "Tib-" indicates the mis-speller pronounces it at two phonemes at least.

Daisuke_Aramaki
October 9th, 2008, 08:03 PM
recently my thesis advisor mispronounced thousandth as ssousandss and it cracked me up big time!

pp.
October 9th, 2008, 08:06 PM
Georgians pronounce Tbilisi with a barely-spoken 't', so that it almost sounds like /bɪˈlisi/, or "bill-EE-see"; English speakers often mispronounce it like /tɪbˈlisi/, or "tib-LEE-see". The correct pronunciation is /ˌtbiˈliːsi/, or "tbee-LEE-see", with no vowel between the T and B, but both pronounced nonetheless.

No sweat, but not all that pronounceable for me. However, replacing the 'b' by 'w' makes it quite simple to pronounce.

Since there are many instances where one language uses 'b' where another one has 'w', that might be good enough for many purposes.

LaRoza
October 9th, 2008, 08:16 PM
No sweat, but not all that pronounceable for me. However, replacing the 'b' by 'w' makes it quite simple to pronounce.

Since there are many instances where one language uses 'b' where another one has 'w', that might be good enough for many purposes.

The IPA guide is on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tbilisi

73ckn797
October 10th, 2008, 11:59 AM
Rhat gets weally fwustwating is rhen someone sritches the R & W keys on my keyboawd!

Must be that Wascally Wabbit! He He, come here Mistew Wabbit, it is suppew time.

pp.
October 10th, 2008, 02:33 PM
The IPA guide is on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tbilisi

Why, thanx. My IPA skills have become a bit rusty.

Besides, knowing how it ought to sound does not make it pronounceable in every case. There are some combined and even single sounds that one can not produce unless (either) one has been exposed to it since early childhood (or) one is an accomplished/trained actor/singer.

'Tb' at the beginning of a word is one of those in my case.

Another one would be the clicking noise heard in some African languages. Listen to some recordings by Miriam Makeba, for example. I can do that passably well on its own (I fancy), but certainly not between wovels in normal speech.

LaRoza
October 10th, 2008, 02:53 PM
Why, thanx. My IPA skills have become a bit rusty.

I use: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA

It has recordings of all the sounds.


[quote
Besides, knowing how it ought to sound does not make it pronounceable in every case. There are some combined and even single sounds that one can not produce unless (either) one has been exposed to it since early childhood (or) one is an accomplished/trained actor/singer.

Another one would be the clicking noise heard in some African languages. Listen to some recordings by Miriam Makeba, for example. I can do that passably well on its own (I fancy), but certainly not between wovels in normal speech.[/QUOTE]

Arabic has some sounds that are quite interesting. In most books, they describe it as the sound of retching...

(It isn't hard to do, but it isn't something one would normally want to do)

diskotek
October 10th, 2008, 06:47 PM
usally mines when i'm in France :)

once the barmen was about to die of laughing since i was trying to ask for a "stella artois" (this happened in belgium/brussels)

Sam the Wizer
October 10th, 2008, 06:54 PM
A coworker complained that she only had 70 kigabytes(Kb) remaining on her hard drive. :)

Tomatz
October 10th, 2008, 09:25 PM
Ever heard a spaniard offering you a piggy back...

..."Jump on my back"


:lolflag:


Crude i know :(

Corfy
October 11th, 2008, 01:56 AM
I don't know if this is the "funniest", but I smile every time I hear it.

Our GPS unit has some problems pronouncing some common words occasionally. My favorite is "Maryland", which it pronounces as "may-RIL-and".

Giant Speck
October 11th, 2008, 02:45 AM
I don't know if this is the "funniest", but I smile every time I hear it.

Our GPS unit has some problems pronouncing some common words occasionally. My favorite is "Maryland", which it pronounces as "may-RIL-and".

Which reminds me.

It's Missouri, not Missouruh.

I kind of wish my home state was still pronounced Ioway. That sounds so much cooler than Iowa.

73ckn797
October 11th, 2008, 03:49 AM
Which reminds me.

It's Missouri, not Missouruh.

I kind of wish my home state was still pronounced Ioway. That sounds so much cooler than Iowa.

A rich southern drawl will make Georgia sound like it is spelled "Jawja".

Tomatz
October 11th, 2008, 09:14 AM
Type in a terminal:


espeak "ubuntu linux"

:)

luctor
October 11th, 2008, 09:35 AM
One time the band played "Long Train Running" ,the song by the Doobie Brothers.
There's a kind of pause in the song where the singer sings "Where would you be now" (http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=tnD0eVdHJfI at 2:41). Someone in the audience sung really loud "LISTEN TO ME NOW" ..

Still makes me smile

forrestcupp
October 11th, 2008, 02:22 PM
There are some combined and even single sounds that one can not produce unless (either) one has been exposed to it since early childhood (or) one is an accomplished/trained actor/singer.Kind of like how a lot of Asians can't pronounce the "L" sound so they make an "R" sound. That reminds me of one of the funniest mispronunciations I've heard. It was in the movie "The Christmas Story" when the Chinese guys were singing "Deck the Halls". "Fa ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra"


Which reminds me.

It's Missouri, not Missouruh.
Right on! And you aren't supposed to pronounce the "S" in Illinois. That really gets on my nerves.

LaRoza
October 11th, 2008, 05:54 PM
Kind of like how a lot of Asians can't pronounce the "L" sound so they make an "R" sound. That reminds me of one of the funniest mispronunciations I've heard. It was in the movie "The Christmas Story" when the Chinese guys were singing "Deck the Halls". "Fa ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra"

It is an allophone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allophone). All languages have them (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA for sounds).

We typically don't notice allophones, because, to the speaker, they are not different sounds, however, it is when you learn a language that makes distinctions, then you see them and struggle. For example, in Hindi, there are four letters for "t", "d", "n", two for the "ch" sound in English, two for "j" sound (as in "just"), same with "p", "g" and others. Each one has their own symbol. Interestingly, these sounds are not hard to say for English speakers once you are used to them but it takes time to hear the difference. (It also leads to accents. In speakers of English who make the distinctions, they do so also in English, typically leading to a distinct accent)



Right on! And you aren't supposed to pronounce the "S" in Illinois. That really gets on my nerves.
And you aren't supposed to pronounce the "Henry ... Jr" part of Indiana Jones.

pp.
October 11th, 2008, 06:35 PM
It is an allophone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allophone).

I don't think so. I know a few Asian people who say 'L' when they mean to say 'R'. They also say 'L' when they mean to say 'L'. According to definition of allophone, the substitution of one sound for another one in place of the same phoneme does not change the meaning, just the accent.

"Lies" and "rice" isn't the same, quite.

I think those I know are aware of the difference. They can not produce the 'r' sound.

I am a bit embarassed to confess that I happened to order "flied lies" in Indian restaurants a couple of times when I meant "fried rice".

LaRoza
October 11th, 2008, 06:44 PM
I don't think so. I know a few Asian people who say 'L' when they mean to say 'R'. They also say 'L' when they mean to say 'L'. According to definition of allophone, the substitution of one sound for another one in place of the same phoneme does not change the meaning, just the accent.

In some languages. "Asian" is too vague.



"Lies" and "rice" isn't the same, quite.
"z" and "s" are not allphones in that language.



I think those I know are aware of the difference. They can not produce the 'r' sound.

Actually, they can't hear it (without training if it is an allophone, as it is in some languages). Like most English speakers (probably German as well) can't hear the difference between the aspirated, unaspirated, dental and retroflex sounds in Hindi.

pp.
October 11th, 2008, 08:17 PM
In some languages. "Asian" is too vague.

Im a desolate that I can't be more specific. The setting consists of various restaurants offering Indian cuisine. I haven't the foggiest notion about the ethnicities of most of the people working there.

One of the owners is ethnically a Tamil, politically a Malaysian. Others are Indians, Pakistani, Sri Lankans and whatnot. Some of them I have asked, some not. I am sure some of them can hear the difference between "r" and "l". I'm just as sure they can't pronounce the "r"-sound. It's not a question of language skills or intelligence, as they understand our local dialects just fine.

Even though they speak English technically better than I do, they appear to be utterly incapable to produce some of the sounds.

LaRoza
October 11th, 2008, 08:48 PM
Im a desolate that I can't be more specific. The setting consists of various restaurants offering Indian cuisine. I haven't the foggiest notion about the ethnicities of most of the people working there.

It could be a large mix. There is really no way to tell without asking, but South Indians are usually a little darker in general.



One of the owners is ethnically a Tamil, politically a Malaysian. Others are Indians, Pakistani, Sri Lankans and whatnot. Some of them I have asked, some not. I am sure some of them can hear the difference between "r" and "l". I'm just as sure they can't pronounce the "r"-sound. It's not a question of language skills or intelligence, as they understand our local dialects just fine.

Tamililian probably speaks Tamil. Pakistani's probably speak Panjabi or Urdu. Sr Lankans may speak Tamil as well, and I can't remember what other language would be popular...

The "r" sound is pronouncable, but it may be a vowel issue, which leads to problems.



Even though they speak English technically better than I do, they appear to be utterly incapable to produce some of the sounds.

English has a lot of dipthongs and has a different phonology. Indian languages are very precise so "se" (a postposition in Hindi) is not the same as the word "say" (english word). They can make the sounds, but they often use their native language rules, where the sounds are more precise

English vowels are hard: http://74.125.45.104/search?q=cache:oBici1Wd6isJ:www.uoregon.edu/~tpayne/APP2007/APPSession03-4-2007-Payne-print.pdf+vowel+coloring&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us&client=opera

The sounds "d" and "t" are often retroflex when they speak them as well. "th" the English sound, is also not present at all, and may be changed to a aspirated retroxflex "t" or "d".

de616
October 12th, 2008, 01:34 AM
A french exchange student wants to say "can i have a sheet?" but to everyone including the teacher misheard it as s#it. We were all dumbstruck then burst out laughing (if that's not a WTF moment, i don't know what is :lolflag: )

Giant Speck
October 12th, 2008, 01:53 AM
Right on! And you aren't supposed to pronounce the "S" in Illinois. That really gets on my nerves.

I lived across the river from both Illinois and Missouri for 19 years.

It was commmon to hear the incorrect "Missouruh" and the correct "Illinoi."

I lived in a small town called "Keokuk," which was pronounced so many ways:

KEE-oh-kuk
KEE-uh-kuk
KEE-l-kuk
KILL-kuk

Corfy
October 12th, 2008, 02:41 AM
Oh, there are all sorts of town names that are pronounced differently than what you would expect.

I used to live in Versailles (ver-SALES).

We were close to Milan (MY-lun) and Vevay (vee-vee).

Later, I lived near St. Maurice (saint morris).

I'm currently close to New Palestine (new pal-es-teen).

Giant Speck
October 12th, 2008, 02:53 AM
My mother's name is Clarice.

Clarice is a French name derived from the Italian name Clarissa.

It is pronounced "Cluh-rees," but a lot of people like to pronounce it "Clair-ees." However, Clarice is not derived from Claire. Claire and Clarice both share an root in the Latin word clarus, but have two different pronunciations.

clarus
Claritia
Clarissa
Clarice

clarus
Clare
Clair
Claire


Oh, and for extra lulz, her middle name is Marie. :lolflag:

crimesaucer
October 12th, 2008, 06:32 PM
'Cthulhu' as pronounced by my niece when she was one year old.

Why did she say it? Because I had given her this and it was my goal to get her to say it: http://www.amazon.com/Mini-Cthulhu-Plush-TOY-HP004/dp/B0006FUAD6/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=toys-and-games&qid=1222971928&sr=8-2

I thought of GWAR when I read this.....



I live and work in the US, but was not born there, and I always wonder why many americans pronounce the word "nuclear" as "nu-cu-lar". Anyone care to explain?

This always scares me when I hear it pronounced this way.....



umm....this one was done by me......i was about 8 years old. I was playing dr. robnics lean bean machine game for sega (old school, i know) so the third person you battle has these tentacles that move when he wins. well i got really mad and i said "i'm going to win, i'm going to fry his testicles off.":oops: At the time i didn't know what i said.....now i know......


Sega is "old school"?


Damn, I must be ancient..... I thought Atari 2600 was "old school".



When I was a teenager, there was a rock duo that maybe some of you might possibly remember: Hall & Oates. Problem was, I heard their names mentioned on the radio, but I never saw their names in print. So I was with my friends talking about songs we liked, and I said "Have any of you heard the new song by Hauling Oats?" There was total silence for about 3 seconds when all heads turned to me, and then everyone broke out in uncontrollable laughter... and I was red as a beet. :oops:

I never did live that one down; even a few years later, my friends would sometimes tease me by saying "so how many oats have you hauled today?"

..... and this was just plain funny.



I think I've been pronouncing "Linux" wrong..... is it pronounced like, "Lenn-ox" or "Line-ux"?