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cardinals_fan
October 1st, 2008, 08:13 PM
I love deeply grim and depressing classical music. I've spent a ton of time googling, and I found some good stuff (this page (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071221172336AA0DKtW) was very helpful). Here's some stuff I like:

* Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
* Rachmaninoff's Prelude In G Sharp minor, Op. 32, No. 12
* Chopin's Sonata 2 (includes the Funeral March)

Can anybody recommend similarly depressing classical music?

EDIT: I just took a look at Pandora Radio. Very cool.

Ozor Mox
October 1st, 2008, 08:21 PM
Samuel Barber - Adagio for Strings?

snowpine
October 1st, 2008, 08:23 PM
Benjamin Britten has some pretty intense pieces, and definitely check out Arvo Parte for some calm-yet-sort-of-creepy music. Also there is some pretty grim stuff by Shostakovich and Mahler.

Also it helps if you try to configure your Slitaz wireless while you listen. :)

LaRoza
October 1st, 2008, 08:24 PM
Depressing or calming?

pp.
October 1st, 2008, 08:26 PM
Schubert - Winterreise

Mazza558
October 1st, 2008, 08:28 PM
Samuel Barber - Adagio for Strings?

I second this.

cardinals_fan
October 1st, 2008, 08:39 PM
Depressing or calming?
Depressing, grim, melancholy, angry, sad, etc.

Irihapeti
October 1st, 2008, 08:46 PM
Then I think you can include most of Chopin in your classification. Definitely melancholy.

I'd add Mahler to that, too. Das Lied von der Erde is all about death. (Makes me feel grim just remembering listening to it.)

cardinals_fan
October 1st, 2008, 08:47 PM
Samuel Barber - Adagio for Strings?
Of course, how could I forget that :)

amersault
October 1st, 2008, 08:49 PM
ok i know it's not quite classical but i think Eric Satie falls into this category.

i specifically like - gymnopedies - La 1 Ere. Lent et Douloureux.

cardinals_fan
October 1st, 2008, 08:51 PM
I already have a healthy Chopin collection. Mahler seems excellent too - listening to part of his 3rd symphony now :)

chucky chuckaluck
October 1st, 2008, 08:51 PM
tchaikovsky - 6th symphony
berg - violin concerto
puccini - la boheme
brahms - 3rd symphony
mahler - 9th symphony, kindertotenlieder
wagner - liebestot (from tristan und isolde)
schumann - dichterliebe
vaughan-williams - the lark ascending (find the pinchas zuckerman recording, if you can.)
durufle - requiem
berg - wozzeck (more gloomy than depressing, in the manner i think you meant)
massenet -werther
ravel - pavane pour une infante défunt

there's so much stuff it's kind of overwhelming to come up with a list.

urukrama
October 1st, 2008, 09:07 PM
Albinoni's Adagio in G minor?

Ozor Mox
October 1st, 2008, 09:13 PM
Albinoni's Adagio in G minor?

Good one!

CJ56
October 1st, 2008, 09:24 PM
Brahms - Requiem
Vaughan Williams - Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus
Tallis - Lamentations of Jeremiah
Bach - St Matthew Passion (although it does go on a bit)
Beethoven - String Quartet Op. 131
Shostakovich - Just about any of the String Quartets...

pp.
October 1st, 2008, 09:26 PM
shostakovich - just about any of the string quartets...

+1

lisati
October 1st, 2008, 09:27 PM
Reading through the posts I was stuck for a suggestion until I was rememinded of Tcahikovsky's 6th symphony. I recall it being part of the music curriculum back in my school days.... There's some nice calming parts, and some spooky parts.

snova
October 1st, 2008, 09:40 PM
Ah, you have such good taste!

I second what everybody else said about Chopin. Look especially look at his Etudes and Scherzos. I particularly like:


Etude No. 4 in C sharp minor
Etude No. 12 in C minor
Etude No. 11 in A minor ('Winter Wind')
Etude No. 12 in C minor ('Revolutionary')
Scherzo in B flat minor/D flat major, op. 31
Scherzo in C sharp minor, op. 39


Some of these might not be quite what you had in mind, but I like them...

Apart from that, I can't suggest anything new except Mozart's Requiem.

EDIT: Oh, don't forget Bach's fugues!

cardinals_fan
October 1st, 2008, 10:20 PM
Thanks to all who responded. I've found some new stuff (and remembered some old ;)). Here are some of the best I have now:

* Tchaikovsky: Symphony #6
* Chopin: Sonata 2, Ballade 1, Etudes 11 and 12, Scherzo in C Sharp Minor, Op. 39, plus much more
* Bach: Prelude and Fugue #8
* Rachmaninoff: Prelude in G Sharp Minor, Op. 32 #12
* Beethoven: Sonata #8, Moonlight Sonata, Symphony #5
* Holst: The Planets - Mars
* Mahler: Trombone Solo from Symphony #3

By the way, almost everything above is available (legally!) for free.

oldos2er
October 1st, 2008, 11:11 PM
Bach's toccata and fugue in D minor.

OutOfReach
October 1st, 2008, 11:16 PM
Might not be a classic, but has anyone heard:
Lux Aeterna (A.K.A. Requiem for a dream) - Clint Mansell

kk0sse54
October 1st, 2008, 11:32 PM
* Tchaikovsky: Symphony #6


+1, just analyzed it today in IB Music along with some earlier Gregorian Chants that are more solemn than depressing.

Ozor Mox
October 1st, 2008, 11:46 PM
A couple more plus YouTube links to have a listen :)

Brian Eno - An Ending (Ascent)
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=lOgQyIMX_XU

Thomas Newman - American Beauty
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=8Bitlscw5bA

John Murphy - Sunshine (main theme and ending)
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=eRDty052c2c
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=QQb3Fx8KydQ

These are film not classical I suppose, but still great!

unix1980
October 1st, 2008, 11:55 PM
Depressing, grim, melancholy, angry, sad, etc.

Interesting topic. I avoid depressing music so I can't help there. In addition to Shostakovitch quartets, several of his symphonies are grim, melancholic, angry. Puccini operas are typically sad, but beautiful. Another opera that may fit your criteria is Berg's Wozzeck. This is a tough but thought-provoking question, because we all feel music in such a personal way.

cardinals_fan
October 2nd, 2008, 12:53 AM
Allan Pettersson is perhaps the darkest composer I've ever heard.

Lux Perpetua
October 2nd, 2008, 02:23 AM
* Bach: Prelude and Fugue #8Please be more specific. Are we talking D#-minor, WTC Book 1? If so, I concur 100%. (Glenn Gould's recording of the prelude, in particular, is breathtaking.)

If you're really into dark music, I think there should be a lot more Rachmaninov on your list. I would add:

- Isle of the Dead
- Two piano fantasy
- Piano concertos 1, 3 (the others are good too, but not as dark)
- Most of the Etudes-Tableaux
- Most of the preludes (C# minor comes to mind first)
- Sonata for Cello and Piano, and most of his other music for cello and piano
- most of Rachmaninov's other music

The Sonata for Cello and Piano, in particular, is one of the finest pieces of music out there.

If I can recommend an artist as well, I'll say Vladimir Ashkenazy. His interpretations of Rachmaninov are pretty much the gold standard for me.

cardinals_fan
October 2nd, 2008, 02:36 AM
Please be more specific. Are we talking D#-minor, WTC Book 1? If so, I concur 100%. (Glenn Gould's recording of the prelude, in particular, is breathtaking.)

You are correct :)

DrOlaf
October 2nd, 2008, 02:40 AM
If you want twentieth century composers, there's always Gorecki's Symphony #3 (The Symphony of Sorrowful Songs).

cardinals_fan
October 2nd, 2008, 02:41 AM
If you want twentieth century composers, there's always Gorecki's Symphony #3 (The Symphony of Sorrowful Songs).
I actually prefer older composers, because the music is more likely to be in the public domain (and, therefore, free).

Frak
October 2nd, 2008, 02:43 AM
"Lux Aeterna" by Clint Mansell

An angry meloncholy peice.

DrOlaf
October 2nd, 2008, 02:48 AM
I actually prefer older composers, because the music is more likely to be in the public domain (and, therefore, free).


OK, then how about Tomas Luis de Victoria's Super Flumina Babylonis, written around 1570? It's full of longing and the pain of separation from your homeland.

perryrt
October 2nd, 2008, 02:50 AM
Brahms. Definitely Brahms. Particularly the last movement of the 4th symphony and his three string quartets.

Parts of the Bach Cello Suites, but that's more of a "highs and lows" sort of work.

Oh, and 20th century, check out Philip Glass - "Glassworks" is one of the most involved intense soundscapes I've ever understood.

pp.
October 2nd, 2008, 05:22 PM
Almost any symphony by Anton Bruckner or Sibelius.
Most of Beethoven's Missa Solemnis

chucky chuckaluck
October 2nd, 2008, 06:37 PM
a few more....

the andante from the shostakovich Fmajor piano concerto - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twy4gaJeLqs

kiri te kanawa singing the third of strauss' vier letzte lieder - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8l99a5hJng

lucia popp singing "in trutina" from carmina burana - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UVNYXOBWJA (don't ask me wtf she's doing, or why she's dressed up like a rabbit)

alexis weissenberg playing part of the rachmaninoff 2nd concerto - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bxwmg-YTAr0


i keep wondering if these are depressing, or not, and even if that's what you meant. a lot of classical music walks a very thin line that seperates ecstacy from despair. i've often experienced both at the same time while listening to it and performing it.

sailor2001
October 2nd, 2008, 09:37 PM
Tchaikovsky #4 is the most depressing for me.......

Irihapeti
October 2nd, 2008, 10:03 PM
a lot of classical music walks a very thin line that seperates ecstacy from despair.

Even Mozart, not regarded as a "deep and gloomy" composer. I remember once reading a quote (don't remember where) along the lines of "Underneath the light-hearted exterior [of his music] often lies heartache." I can't give any examples right now but I've certainly experienced this many times.

chucky chuckaluck
October 2nd, 2008, 10:32 PM
Even Mozart, not regarded as a "deep and gloomy" composer. I remember once reading a quote (don't remember where) along the lines of "Underneath the light-hearted exterior [of his music] often lies heartache." I can't give any examples right now but I've certainly experienced this many times.

well, the opening movement of the Gminor symphony is a classic example of what you're talking about; the rhythm and the gestures of the writing are nearly playful, but the harmony and melody are clearly melancholy.

cute cat, btw.

Irihapeti
October 3rd, 2008, 12:15 AM
Actually, a slow movement from a piano concerto has come to mind; trouble is, I can't remember which one it is. Slow movement of the Clarinet Concerto also - at least, to me.

The cat is mine, or should I say, she owns me! She's ten years old.

BobLand
October 3rd, 2008, 12:59 AM
Wagner Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan and Isolde
Wagner Siegfried's Funeral March from Die Gotterdammerung - very dark.
Puccini Turandot
Brahm's Intermetzi - Glen Gould recording
Le Sacre Du Printemps - some consider this dark
First movement of Beethovan's 9th
Another vote for Das Lied von der Erde
Franz Liszt Liebesträume No. 3 & Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
Bela Bartok Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta

chucky chuckaluck
October 3rd, 2008, 01:54 AM
Actually, a slow movement from a piano concerto has come to mind; trouble is, I can't remember which one it is.

this one? http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=df-eLzao63I


The cat is mine, or should I say, she owns me! She's ten years old.

i hope she lives a long time. i'm pretty allergic to cats and i have two of them. they're worth it.

Irihapeti
October 3rd, 2008, 02:11 AM
this one? http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=df-eLzao63I



Unfortunately, I can't watch youtube - I'm on dialup. But the name's come back to me and I'm listening to it right now:

Piano concerto no. 21 in C major, K 467. (Daniel Barenboim and the English Chamber Orchestra)

I hope the cat lives a long time, too. I'm a big softie when it comes to cats.

chucky chuckaluck
October 3rd, 2008, 02:30 AM
Unfortunately, I can't watch youtube - I'm on dialup. But the name's come back to me and I'm listening to it right now:

Piano concerto no. 21 in C major, K 467. (Daniel Barenboim and the English Chamber Orchestra)

I hope the cat lives a long time, too. I'm a big softie when it comes to cats.

k.467 is probably the one thats gotten the most air play over the years. i think the middle movement was even used for some swedish movie ("elvira madigan"?).

mrgnash
October 3rd, 2008, 02:31 AM
For dark and depressing you can't go too wrong with Black Angels by George Crumb :guitar:

Madness Love and Mysticism, Magick, and Rituals by John Zorn are also quite dark.

chucky chuckaluck
October 3rd, 2008, 02:35 AM
stockhausen's stuff can be pretty dreary, as well. "gesang der juenglinge" is just completely devoid of any kind of fun at all. oddly, in his later years, he seemed to have looked more for sunshinier sounds. weird dude, one way or the other.

Onyros
October 3rd, 2008, 02:42 AM
Arvo Pärt, without a doubt. Fratres is one of my favourite pieces, ever. It has been played in string quartet, piano and violin, piano, violin and percussion... etc.

The string quartet versions are usually very, very deep and enthralling. Also, one piece that has become quite popular these last few years, "Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten".

Tabula Rasa is a good choice of first CD by Arvo Pärt.

You'll soon grow addicted to Pärt's tintinnabulation.

HotCupOfJava
October 3rd, 2008, 02:51 AM
Mahler's Symphony#5 is a personal favorite of mine.

Ravel's orchestration of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition (Tableaux d'un Exposition) has some movements that would fit the bill, as well. Hut on Fowl's Legs, Ox Cart, Samuel Goldenberg and Schmyle.....

Technically these are both late- or post-Romantic though, not Classical (as is much of what has been listed already). The late Romantic period is full of that sort of stuff. The rise of programmatic instrumental music in the Romantic period spawned many orchestrations with dark topics. The last movement of Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique is called the "Witches' Sabbath".

If you'd like to hear an example of some dark art-song, Shubert's Earl-King definitely fits the bill. Just get a translation if you can't speak German.

Irihapeti
October 3rd, 2008, 03:02 AM
Yes, the slow movement of the 21st concerto was used as the theme for Elvira Madigan. Prior to that, I gather that the 23rd concerto got the most exposure (or so I read somewhere).

Incidentally, the slow movement of Mahler's 5th symphony was used as the theme for the film Death in Venice.

mrgnash
October 3rd, 2008, 03:13 AM
Mahler's Symphony#5 is a personal favorite of mine.

Ravel's orchestration of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition (Tableaux d'un Exposition) has some movements that would fit the bill, as well. Hut on Fowl's Legs, Ox Cart, Samuel Goldenberg and Schmyle.....

Technically these are both late- or post-Romantic though, not Classical (as is much of what has been listed already). The late Romantic period is full of that sort of stuff. The rise of programmatic instrumental music in the Romantic period spawned many orchestrations with dark topics. The last movement of Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique is called the "Witches' Sabbath".

If you'd like to hear an example of some dark art-song, Shubert's Earl-King definitely fits the bill. Just get a translation if you can't speak German.

Well 'classical' in the formal sense was a pretty brief period, really. Certainly, for my selections I used a much more liberal definition of the word ;)

HotCupOfJava
October 3rd, 2008, 03:29 AM
Well 'classical' in the formal sense was a pretty brief period, really. Certainly, for my selections I used a much more liberal definition of the word ;)

Most people do. I guess I'm just showing my "music nerd" side. I have 2 degrees in music. Saying "classical" IS alot easier than saying "historical music and modern art music". And even THAT is really too narrow for most people's usage of "classical".

My apologies.

loell
October 3rd, 2008, 03:39 AM
Depressing, grim, melancholy, angry, sad, etc.

now I read you as an emo-geek teen. :D

Kingsley
October 3rd, 2008, 03:41 AM
"Wir setzen uns mit Traenen nieder" in St. Matthew's Passion by Johann Bach is something that you'd probably like. It's one of my favorites in the classical genre.

pissedoffdude
October 3rd, 2008, 04:59 AM
Try Erbarme Dich (part of Bach's Matthaeus passion). Also, give Mozart's requiem a shot, especially Lacrimosa.

BOBSONATOR
October 3rd, 2008, 05:11 AM
Albinoni's Adagio in G minor?


Good one!

+1 My favorite

Lux Perpetua
October 3rd, 2008, 05:39 AM
Ah, you have such good taste!

I second what everybody else said about Chopin. Look especially look at his Etudes and Scherzos. I particularly like:


Etude No. 4 in C sharp minor
Etude No. 12 in C minor
Etude No. 11 in A minor ('Winter Wind')
Etude No. 12 in C minor ('Revolutionary')
Scherzo in B flat minor/D flat major, op. 31
Scherzo in C sharp minor, op. 39

Don't forget the ballads. G minor, especially (made famous by The Pianist).

GrouchoMarx
October 3rd, 2008, 05:49 AM
Well, if we're going to talk about Beethoven, then we have to mention the second movement of his seventh symphony, possibly the saddest piece of music ever written. The "Ach, Ich, Fuhl's" aria, from Mozart's The Magic Flute might give it a run for its money.

mrgnash
October 3rd, 2008, 06:11 AM
Most people do. I guess I'm just showing my "music nerd" side. I have 2 degrees in music. Saying "classical" IS alot easier than saying "historical music and modern art music". And even THAT is really too narrow for most people's usage of "classical".

My apologies.

Apologies?? No need. You're absolutely right, I was just trying to cover my own behind there :lol: I have nothing but respect for the music nerds :D

defenestratos
October 3rd, 2008, 09:44 AM
Beethoven piano trio in D maj "The Ghost" 2nd movement,

nothingspecial
October 3rd, 2008, 11:37 AM
A Child Of Our Time - Sir Michael Tippet

chucky chuckaluck
October 3rd, 2008, 12:02 PM
If you'd like to hear an example of some dark art-song, Shubert's Earl-King definitely fits the bill. Just get a translation if you can't speak German.

dark and psychotic, yes, but not really melancholically depressing. it's more like a ghost story.


on the use of 'classical' as a term to describe the wider genre often defined as 'art music': while the term is misused in a musicological sense, it's a term that is correct (i suppose) in a general sense, if one looks at how it has been used. it's a term that everyone understands, though some might cringe at that thought. (i'd also argue that the term 'art music' is a gross insult to other genres of music. what, jazz isn't art?)

:guitar:

nrs
October 4th, 2008, 02:58 PM
What represents sadness / depression (or feeling) is entirely subjective. Someone mentioned Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6. earlier, which doesn't strike me as particularly sad or depressing; it's too boisterous. For me, sad music is usually something minimalist, lethargic, and intimate, I think it's outside the grasp of large orchestra. If you're like me I think chamber music is your best bet.

mkrahmeh
October 4th, 2008, 04:57 PM
you may want to dig more into Mozart's and bear with it, am sure mozart will get you exactly where you want. i cant remember the names but try things related to "coronation mass"..

i also recommend watching this one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qkewRdmrbA

mr.propre
October 4th, 2008, 05:04 PM
I just started to listen to the Red Army Choir. Not totally classic but nice to hear on a cold day in the background.

Phreaker
October 4th, 2008, 05:11 PM
Some of the many pieces by Liszt

lukjad007
October 4th, 2008, 05:14 PM
Have you tried the music that comes with some of the Wesnoth campains? There are some pretty dark tunes that definatly have a classical theme to them.

HotCupOfJava
October 6th, 2008, 03:26 AM
on the use of 'classical' as a term to describe the wider genre often defined as 'art music': while the term is misused in a musicological sense, it's a term that is correct (i suppose) in a general sense, if one looks at how it has been used. it's a term that everyone understands, though some might cringe at that thought. (i'd also argue that the term 'art music' is a gross insult to other genres of music. what, jazz isn't art?)


A very GOOD case can be made for calling jazz art. There are many works by 70's and 80's rock groups that I would also call art. As your observations illustrate, it is VERY difficult to find a more accurate and descriptive "catch-all" word for what most people call "classical" music. Musicologists (yes, they are actually called that) like to use the term "art-music" to distinguish what they are talking about from other types without saying "classical" (because to them that refers to the musical time period from J.S. Bach's death until midway through Beethoven's career).

I suspect that hundreds of years from now music that we have learned to appreciate and enjoy will also be deemed "art-music" by the musicologists.

chucky chuckaluck
October 6th, 2008, 04:06 AM
A very GOOD case can be made for calling jazz art. There are many works by 70's and 80's rock groups that I would also call art. As your observations illustrate, it is VERY difficult to find a more accurate and descriptive "catch-all" word for what most people call "classical" music. Musicologists (yes, they are actually called that) like to use the term "art-music" to distinguish what they are talking about from other types without saying "classical" (because to them that refers to the musical time period from J.S. Bach's death until midway through Beethoven's career).

I suspect that hundreds of years from now music that we have learned to appreciate and enjoy will also be deemed "art-music" by the musicologists.

to me, any music is art (even if it's garbage). it's certainly not a sport (not even verdi).

i think everyone knows what is meant by 'classical music'. 'classical' can be used in a variety of ways. it can refer to a specific period (which is probably a more artificial usage), or it can refer to a more generalized view.

Dr Small
October 6th, 2008, 04:18 AM
you may want to dig more into Mozart's and bear with it, am sure mozart will get you exactly where you want. i cant remember the names but try things related to "coronation mass"..

i also recommend watching this one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qkewRdmrbA
I have one of Mozart's album, but none of it seemed 'depressing music'. To me, it sounded more like imaginative tunes. Of course, the one's that are on this disc are:
The Marriage of Figaro
Clarinet Concerto in B Flat Major
Piano Concerto No. 21 in C Major
Horn Concerto No. 4 in E Flat Major
Exsultate Jubilate
Serenade "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik"
Sinfonia Concertante

... And the likes.

chucky chuckaluck
October 6th, 2008, 04:27 AM
I have one of Mozart's album, but none of it seemed 'depressing music'. To me, it sounded more like imaginative tunes. Of course, the one's that are on this disc are:

Exsultate Jubilate


that title kind of precludes 'depressing', unless mozart was being a smartpants.

nothingspecial
October 6th, 2008, 01:00 PM
to me, any music is art (even if it's garbage).

That depends on what you consider art, although that is a different question.

pp.
October 6th, 2008, 10:21 PM
Another candidate for depressing classical music:

"Let's fake an opera" by Gerard Hoffnung.

The Queen of the Night, performed by Foster Jenkins

afroman10496
June 8th, 2010, 04:30 AM
Aria and Rondinella for oboe. The first part- it just somehow depresses me, but it's catchy. And then the second part is too happy. Stupid bipolar songs... lol:)

handy
June 8th, 2010, 05:56 AM
Hell, just get the Leonard Cohen collection?

Classical its not, but it is certainly great accompaniment for a suicide, it could perhaps even motivate a suicide in the susceptible.

I call it music to slash your wrists by...

Thankfully I've rarely heard any of his stuff since the 70s.

standingwave
June 8th, 2010, 08:45 AM
Beethoven's String Quartet No. 14 in c sharp minor, Op 131, sixth movement. This link is movements V through VII but I've cued it to the beginning of the sixth: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ty7dk9UMdoo#t=5m15s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ty7dk9UMdoo#t=5m15s)

Soul-Sing
June 8th, 2010, 08:54 AM
Charles Ives: The Unanswered Question :(

NightwishFan
June 8th, 2010, 08:55 AM
Samuel Barber - Adagio for Strings?

Epic win.

JDShu
June 8th, 2010, 09:35 AM
This thread made me listen to classical music the whole night.

NightwishFan
June 8th, 2010, 09:36 AM
Nothing wrong with that. I personally listen to mainly film scores, which are the next generation of classics in my opinion.

JDShu
June 8th, 2010, 09:43 AM
And game music :D

Jeremy Soule is awesome.

7G Operator
June 8th, 2010, 10:14 AM
Any one said Mozart - Summer Overture yet?

Elgar - Nimrod. Always gets played at war memorials. Such a beautiful piece of music. I wonder if anyone ever did solve the Enigma? ;)

7G Operator
June 8th, 2010, 10:15 AM
I agree with Nightwish fan, theres some awesome classical film music out there.

VCoolio
June 8th, 2010, 11:06 AM
Ah, a revived zombie thread that seems to catch on. Why isn't Albinoni's adagio in g minor in here yet? (It's the piece that Agnes plays while she's trying to commit suicide in ****ing Åmål).
Also: Bach, BWV 103, a wonderful cantata.

Edit: I see that the movie title I mentioned is censored; don't let it fool you, it's a brilliant movie and very prudent.

samalex
June 8th, 2010, 01:57 PM
Benjamin Britten has some pretty intense pieces, and definitely check out Arvo Parte for some calm-yet-sort-of-creepy music. Also there is some pretty grim stuff by Shostakovich and Mahler.

Also it helps if you try to configure your Slitaz wireless while you listen. :)

I like Benjamin Britten, and yeah some of his stuff meets what the OP is looking for.

Also though it's not classical per say, SomaFM's Doomed station (http://somafm.com/play/doomed) has lots of great music that's very dark. I personally like this kind of music as background while coding.

Sam

Breambutt
June 8th, 2010, 02:11 PM
Some of Vivaldi's cello concertos amidst the cheerful and upbeat dance tunes are rather "depressing". It feels like these "mainstream" classical composers are often overlooked when it comes to their other works, or compositions for other than their primary instrument - kinda like the short stories of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.

JDShu
June 8th, 2010, 02:12 PM
Ah, a revived zombie thread that seems to catch on. Why isn't Albinoni's adagio in g minor in here yet?

That is the first thing I thought of when I say the title too.. but it is. Post #13 :D

Breambutt
June 8th, 2010, 02:18 PM
Oh yeah, I actually own an album called "Melancholic Sibelius", so I guess it's a potential candidate even though I don't care much for Sibelius in general. Finns - the least musical nation in the world.

VCoolio
June 8th, 2010, 02:39 PM
That is the first thing I thought of when I say the title too.. but it is. Post #13 :D

Hmm, I deliberately did a 'albinoni' thread search before I posted. How depressing this all is. Well, I know what music I need to listen to now. Also I'd like to mention Saint-Saëns 'The Swan' (or le Cygne if you wish).

cmargolin
June 8th, 2010, 08:58 PM
Puccini's Chrysanthemums is the most depressing music I have ever heard.

kamaboko
June 8th, 2010, 09:10 PM
This is pretty depressing not to mention crappy. lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Km8MOO-s80w

ssachy
June 18th, 2010, 01:43 AM
This thread is just what I was looking for.

I like Satie's Gymnopaedies and Gnossiennes. Some film soundtracks are pretty depressing too - the best for me are The Hours (all of it) and the main theme from 2046. On the non-classical side, Thom Yorke is great too.

NightwishFan
June 18th, 2010, 02:05 AM
Patrick Cassidy and produced by Hans Zimmer - Vide Cor Meum
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3lHsxrdpTg

oedipuss
June 18th, 2010, 07:51 AM
How about Rachmaninoff's trio elegiaque No.1 ?
I find it rather depressing even through its more energetic parts. And the way it ends is pure despair =D

darsu
June 18th, 2010, 04:58 PM
Franz Liszt - La lugubre gondola no. 1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDEBfJxsJZ8), which I hear depicts the boat carrying Wagner's body down the Canal Grande in Venice.

Giacinto Scelsi - Hymnos (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1n-DQonQhs)

The Lacrimosa from Penderecki's Polish Requiem (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4l672HYgzow)

keithpeter
June 19th, 2010, 10:05 PM
Hello All

Nice thread.

I'm going for Shubert's piano sonata in B-flat major, D960. Not violently depressing, just resigned, melancholy, oil lamp lit room.

I heard Alfred Brendel play the sonata at a concert in Birmingham last year during what became his farewell tour. I've got the Schnabel recording - an old sound recording seems to suit the music better.

http://www.gardnermuseum.org/music/library.asp

A source of classical music, and a biweekly podcast. Enjoy.

agnes
June 20th, 2010, 12:01 AM
Liszt, Totentaz for Piano & Orchestra (S 125) / Totentaz for Piano Solo (S 525) (more gloomy than sad imo)

Wim Mertens - A Tiels Leis / Comme en Dormant / Zutzig (crying songs)

Dvorak - Cello Concerto in B Minor (Op. 104)

Einaudi - Ascolta

Glass - The Poet Acts / Dead Things (also on the mentioned The Hours soundtrack btw)

Labus
June 20th, 2010, 12:33 AM
Might not be a classic, but has anyone heard:
Lux Aeterna (A.K.A. Requiem for a dream) - Clint Mansell

I have! It's amazing, one of the best new ones out there.

whitespiral
June 20th, 2010, 01:57 AM
Beethoven has many depressing music... but he doesn't stay on that sentiment for too long.

I suggest you try:

- Symphony No 3 and No 7 - 2nd movements
- Piano sonata No 7 - Largo e mesto movement
- Hammerklavier sonata - 2nd movement

oldos2er
June 20th, 2010, 02:42 AM
Some of Gyorgy Ligeti's compositions are bleak and depressing to my ears. Don't ask me to name any offhand, because I can't.

BslBryan
June 20th, 2010, 03:04 AM
I hate the term classical music as pieces that were written back then did not all sound the same and, for example, could easily be called blues in some instances, etc. So I will suggest a couple of songs that I love that were written recently that seem right up your alley.

Yann Tiersen - Comptine d'un autre ete l'apres midi
Heavy Rain Soundtrack - Painful Memories

Shining Arcanine
June 20th, 2010, 08:00 AM
I love deeply grim and depressing classical music. I've spent a ton of time googling, and I found some good stuff (this page (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071221172336AA0DKtW) was very helpful). Here's some stuff I like:

* Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
* Rachmaninoff's Prelude In G Sharp minor, Op. 32, No. 12
* Chopin's Sonata 2 (includes the Funeral March)

Can anybody recommend similarly depressing classical music?

EDIT: I just took a look at Pandora Radio. Very cool.

Listen to The Passion of Christ soundtrack.