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Ms_Angel_D
September 28th, 2008, 04:40 AM
So I was curious, What we're/are/have been some of the biggest adjustments for you when switching from windows to Ubuntu and how did it effect you? I know for a lot of people one of the big adjustments is Not needing antivirus/spyware tools.

For me I had to adjust to the way Ubuntu handles memory, the system monitor threw me through a loop at first when it kept looking so full all time, until I realized that a lot of that was just cached memory, and you want your system to use all your memory anyway...

Thoughts?


Angel

RiceMonster
September 28th, 2008, 04:49 AM
Hmmm... I found installing software was the biggest thing to adjust to in Linux (I already knew how to use the CLI before I installed Linux on my own computer). I still wanted to go to the website of the software and install it from there. Now that I've adjusted (which wasn't hard), I much prefer to use a package manager.

Oh, I guess the way the file system is layed out took me a bit to get used to as well.

lian1238
September 28th, 2008, 04:54 AM
The biggest adjustment for me was being able to move windows but holding down Alt and dragging anywhere. In windows, I was restricted to just the titlebar. And sometimes, they manage to get themselves above the screen, making them unmovable. After using Ubuntu for a long time, whenever I'm in Windows, I always forget and do the Alt+drag thing, and I go, "Oh, I'm in Windows."

The second thing, would be the cube. Oh, I love the cube and compiz.:guitar:

Ms_Angel_D
September 28th, 2008, 04:56 AM
The biggest adjustment for me was being able to move windows but holding down Alt and dragging anywhere.

Hmm interesting, wasn't aware I could do that..lol...thanks :D

mike1234
September 28th, 2008, 05:05 AM
you want your system to use all your memory anyway...

Thoughts?


Angel

Well maybe not all of it........:) Most of the transition went pretty smooth. Some initial frustration learning installation procedures, as opposed to using .exe. I love how customizable Linux is. Windows XP has what, 3 themes? Blue, Silver and puke green. Whoopee! With Compiz added to gnome, I have so many choices it's almost impossible to pick one theme. I am one happy pappy.

M.

OutOfReach
September 28th, 2008, 05:05 AM
I didn't know that you could use ALT+Click to move the windows neither, until I used Fluxbox. It's a really cool keyboard shortcut (So Is ALT+Right Click, used in Fluxbox to resize windows).

Anyways, I think the biggest adaptation that I had to make was:
1.) The filesystem, I was really used to the Windows Filesystem
2.) Defragging, I would defrag every morning before I went to school in Windows but I had to soon dump that habit. :)
3.) Virus Scanner, Everytime I downloaded a file from Firefox I would scan it for viruses, not anymore.
4.) Repositories, Really, really, really cool feature.

That's about it.

mike1234
September 28th, 2008, 05:17 AM
I didn't know that you could use ALT+Click to move the windows neither.

I never knew that either. But then I've always used left mouse click to drag the Window. A leftover from my MS days.

M.

lian1238
September 28th, 2008, 05:52 AM
I didn't know that you could use ALT+Click to move the windows neither, until I used Fluxbox. It's a really cool keyboard shortcut (So Is ALT+Right Click, used in Fluxbox to resize windows).


In Ubuntu, to resize is Alt+Middle-click.

For laptop users, you can do two finger tap and drag. I think you need to configure synaptics (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SynapticsTouchpad). You can config it to do many things like circular scrolling, multi-finger scrolling, etc.

steveneddy
September 28th, 2008, 06:42 AM
I basically turned my back on Windows and learned as much as I could about Linux and Ubuntu.

I didn't learn everything in one day, of course, but it has been a wonderful ride.

Did you know that you could highlight text that you want to copy and center click (the scroll wheel) to paste?

lian1238
September 28th, 2008, 06:57 AM
Another thing which confused me was, "how do I hide files and folders??"
I found out that you need to rename and put a dot in front of the filename or put a '~' at the back. There's another way for Ubuntu (nautilus) users: create a file called ".hidden" in the directory of the files/folders to be hidden, then put the names into that ".hidden" file.
Oh, by the way, Ctrl+H to hide/unhide. ;)

Ms_Angel_D
September 28th, 2008, 07:26 AM
Hey this is turning into a handy thread :D. Something else that took me a bit of getting used to the key combinations for grouping, but I've pretty much got the hang of them now.


Did you know that you could highlight text that you want to copy and center click (the scroll wheel) to paste?

Yeah I just discovered this the other day by accident while using the terminal :D

Another handy feature I discovered while perusing the forums was being able to preview music, by hovering over it.

Just edit your nautilus preferences and under preview set the option, then when your viewing music as icons and you hover over them they will play :D My husband adores that feature.

bigbrovar
September 28th, 2008, 07:48 AM
One of the things i had to adjust to was The community.nothing like it on windows.
The fact that i didn't need to look for cracks and keygen to use my favorite programs because everything is free,
it also took a while to get used to the idea of running a computer with no anti virus,
also the filesystem took some time to understand-especially mounting of drives-.then the fact that most hardware just works plug n play e.g when you plug in a mouse or bluetooth device it works instantly.
but for me the greatest adjustment from the windows mindset are the millions of devs,repository hosts,documentation writers,those who help in the forums. etc that make Linux what it is. the fact the these people are mainly volunteers and do what they do for the passion and not for any financial reward is a refreshing change from the windows ecosystem were something a small as an mp3 encoder can sell for $50

lisati
September 28th, 2008, 08:16 AM
I don't miss the regular, time-consuming scans for malware, along with keeping the relevant software up-to-date. Neither do I miss the frequent need for other system maintenance such as defrag.

Solicitous
September 28th, 2008, 08:34 AM
Well for me (and this is Linux/FreeBSD in general) had to break the habit of a fresh reinstall every 6 months. Win98/2k/XP I always do a fresh reinstall approx every 6 months, gives a clean fresh start.

I used to find the virtual desktops a bit daunting initially, but now I have trouble going back to Windows and not having that functionality available to me.

rudihawk
September 28th, 2008, 11:19 AM
I can leave it on forever, and install and remove as much stuff as I like and it will still run as fast as the day I installed it :D

Naiki Muliaina
September 28th, 2008, 11:25 AM
Installing programs from web downloads. I had issues with terminal heh.

xpod
September 28th, 2008, 11:33 AM
I did`nt really have a "Windows mindset" i needed freeing from:)

SirBismuth
September 29th, 2008, 02:32 PM
I would say the biggest difference was install programs, but the Package Manager helps with that most of the time.

I still find it a bit strange running without a virus-scanner, but the built-in security negates the need for one.

I have been spoilt by the virtual desktops, I use them extensively in Linux. And when I have the misfortune of using a Windoze machine, sometimes look in the bottom-left corner of my screen for the other desktops! :D

B

JetskiDude911
September 29th, 2008, 03:04 PM
I really didn't have any problem with going to Linux because I had been introduced to it at a young age.

Here's what I had to adjust to in Ubuntu though:

- Installing software. I was used to using RPMs. Apt is much better in my opinion.

- Gnome. I had only ever used KDE. I now prfer Gnome over KDE.

DrMega
September 29th, 2008, 03:22 PM
So I was curious, What we're/are/have been some of the biggest adjustments for you when switching from windows to Ubuntu and how did it effect you? I know for a lot of people one of the big adjustments is Not needing antivirus/spyware tools.

For me I had to adjust to the way Ubuntu handles memory, the system monitor threw me through a loop at first when it kept looking so full all time, until I realized that a lot of that was just cached memory, and you want your system to use all your memory anyway...

Thoughts?


Angel

Having used computers since way before MS Windows, there was no real adjustment for me, just relief at finally finding a logical modern OS.

I could never understand why MS ditched the concept of config files in favour of registry settings, why they would leave their OS wide open even though network connections are now the norm even for personal use (there was a day when you had to install extra software and hardware to connect to a network), and why they insisted on tying the GUI so tightly into the OS that if a gui app crashed it would render the whole OS unstable (in Ubuntu, on the rare occassions you get X-server to crash, 9 times out of 10 it just restarts the GUI without having to reboot the whole machine).

SuperSonic4
September 29th, 2008, 03:30 PM
- The Repositories are far superior to trawling websites

- Multimedia. Although VLC and mplayer are on windows Amarok, k3b and smplayer are not. Audacity works well for what I want it to do, soundkonverter is good for CD ripping although k3b does it too. Pacpl audio converter is amazing, transcoding can be done with a right click instead of a dedicated program.

- Konsole. The terminal took a while and at the start I copy and pasted everything but now I know what to do it is far easier than using Adept or going to websites

- Support. Much better and useful advice even for kubuntu

Stefanie
September 29th, 2008, 03:42 PM
like everybody there were a few things i needed to get used to:

- the structure of the filesystem
- permissions and sudo
- hidden files
- mounting and mount points
- software installation & compilation
- where's the registry? :-)
- terminal: cat grep less more locate find ...
- no need to clean up your system every month
- swap

patrickballeux
September 29th, 2008, 03:48 PM
For me, discovering Linux (Mandrake then Ubuntu...) was fun, but I was a little confused by:

* The "DOS" command line: There was a lot of commands to learn... :guitar:
* Mounting drives (and unmounting... Remember diskettes?)
* Sharing files over the network
* Diversity of softwares, there's a lot!
* Taking time to read the documentation/man pages... This is something that windows users do not do at all.
* Burning DVDS (home movie) a few years ago


But it worth the time and effort to learn Linux ways of doing things...

As I say to my friends, when you learn something in Linux (Ubuntu), there a philosophy behind that. Not a way of doing things to get you stuck so you won't look for alternative... :D

My 2 cents
:guitar:

lukjad007
September 29th, 2008, 04:00 PM
The fact that I had to look for answers and not just send it to get fixed.

L815
September 29th, 2008, 04:39 PM
The biggest thing so far are the applications I use for class, and the development tools we work with.

We do majority of the work with Visual Studio, and it's a wonderful application. Even if you hate microsoft, they have one of the best IDE's around.

Eclipse is good, but not as good as Visual Studio :P

I've been programming a lot more in php lately, and thus I amd getting out of the mindset of "stupid program" (to quote my classmate) which appens with Visual Studio (intellisense makes us dumb haha).

Anyway, Visual Studio is great for making fast applications with UI, and I haven't learned how to do that in Linux yet. Once I do, hopefully I can find a job which isn't dependent on Windows API :P

mihai.ile
September 29th, 2008, 04:47 PM
Hello.
Reading this topic I just remembered the time I installed my first linux distro, RedHat.
I burned the iso's and thought: "But where can I find the CD key!?" :confused: So I thought it's that big serial that was on the website (the iso hash :lolflag:) so I wrote it down on paper but I was never asked for such a stupid thing as as serial or CD key or whatsoever..... :D

It took a little to understand the way the filesystem works,
all those permissions to do this and that,
the idea of mounting a hard drive into... a folder wow...

But I was simply amazed by the quantity of software available and how easy was to install rpm's back then and now the Ubuntu repositories. The repos are the best! really...

And from the first time I used Linux I got that feeling that I was actually in control of what is happening on my pc. No hidden things, if you don't like something configure it the way you like.
Never had this feeling on Windows, and even worse the feeling that I am secure and can enter my login info in bank account and other stuff without worrying about spyware, keyloggers, etc.

Oh and one of the most important things is.. well this big community. A big thanks =D> for all of you that makes things happen and contribute to improve.

Chame_Wizard
September 29th, 2008, 05:38 PM
ctrl+alt+backspace for restarting the X.server,virtual desktops,the repositories,free as in free speech :guitar:Sudo apt-get :lolflag:Konsole:tongue:


sudo lsof FTW

Twitch6000
September 29th, 2008, 05:46 PM
Hmmm... I found installing software was the biggest thing to adjust to in Linux (I already knew how to use the CLI before I installed Linux on my own computer). I still wanted to go to the website of the software and install it from there. Now that I've adjusted (which wasn't hard), I much prefer to use a package manager.

Oh, I guess the way the file system is layed out took me a bit to get used to as well.

Ahh yes I think my very first post on here or second was how the heck to install .exe's lol.(I was wanting to play starcraft badly)

Then I found out the difference and all that.

So I got wine and learned dual booting.

So ever sense I have been a big tester of wine and a dual booter >.>.(hope fully the dual booting stops soon <.<).

daniel.hodge
September 29th, 2008, 05:52 PM
I"m still getting used to it, but the hardest thing to get used to was downloading and installing apps. I was surprised to find the wealth of apps that are available for ubuntu. There's some really cool stuff out there.

MaxIBoy
September 29th, 2008, 10:49 PM
First time I used Linux was an Ubuntu 7.10 live CD. I was already familiar with what Linux was, and I'd had a lot of advice beforehand, so the transition was liberating and easy. The filesystem was the only bump for me.

timjohn7
September 29th, 2008, 11:27 PM
Cost of ownership and clear conscience.
Lots of early adjustment to Terminal, commands and file structure, but once the initial shock is over, the wealth of software, ease of operation and system stability are phenomenal.
Finally, the community... the people who provide advice and solutions, who write superb professional software for no (or little) financial reward, who are advocates or just plain users... that's what makes this distro speciial and distinguishes it from Microsoft-based alternatives.
Although I'm set up for dualboot, I haven't in 3 months. I just ahaven't got round to reclaiming the diskspace yet. Besides that, I'm FREE!!!!:)

fballem
September 29th, 2008, 11:49 PM
There are subtle differences in how Open Office works versus Microsoft Office - particularly if you use templates, which I do.

I am understanding CLI better, but I still wish things were easier in GUI mode.

Remembering that this is not Windows - it's different and very effective.

There are a couple of programs I miss - Visio (or at least being able to read/write Visio files) and Enterprise Architect, but I can live without them.

The multiple desktops. I'm not big into visual effects, but hated the orange and brown with a passion. Found the blubuntu theme and that solved my last annoyance.

I had a problem installing a new printer. It was a real treat being able to work directly with the developers of HPLIP to solve the problem - and I was a newbie at the time, so they required a certain amount of patience. That experience sold me on Linux. It's a very different experience trying to solve a problem with Microsoft.