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shazard1
September 2nd, 2008, 10:09 PM
For some time now I have had in idea that I thought would be interesting. Make a professional quality game, have it published by a major software company, and include support for linux. I realize that a single person would not be able to do this. My thought would be to setup a website that a group of programmers could essentially use as a swap space for files dealing with the game, and a discussion area for both the programmers and gamers who wanted to share ideas of how the game should be developed. I know this seems far fetched but IF a game was produced the people involved in its production could split a fair amount of money and it would be a good way to start including linux as a supported os for games. Any thoughts or suggestions?

CptPicard
September 2nd, 2008, 10:17 PM
Better join an existing project, plenty of them around.

You're of course free to try to start your own games company, but I certainly would be betting against your stock.. :)

loganwm
September 2nd, 2008, 10:28 PM
For some time now I have had in idea that I thought would be interesting. Make a professional quality game, have it published by a major software company, and include support for linux. I realize that a single person would not be able to do this. My thought would be to setup a website that a group of programmers could essentially use as a swap space for files dealing with the game, and a discussion area for both the programmers and gamers who wanted to share ideas of how the game should be developed. I know this seems far fetched but IF a game was produced the people involved in its production could split a fair amount of money and it would be a good way to start including linux as a supported os for games. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Do you have any programming experience? If so, please elaborate, I'm just interested.

And if no one has welcomed you to the forums yet: then welcome :)

slavik
September 2nd, 2008, 10:31 PM
it is definately doable, what I would suggest is that if you have an idea, create a rough sketch/demo of the game and then try to entice publishers with the words "must run on Linux" or some such.

shazard1
September 2nd, 2008, 10:46 PM
I am in college and have taken c++. I am currently looking at open gl and direct x on my own through various on line tutorials. It will be some time before I will be able to start seriously considering this...I find that I am motivated when I have a goal to work towards, and I feel that this would be a very interesting project. What I want to accomplish is develop a game that supports linux, has a good story line, and is innovative (Portal). I think that coming up with a good story line is key...I have a few ideas but would like to wait until there is a definite group of people working on the project to really make a decision. The graphics will be challenging for me. I also want to look at a good quality sound track to play during the game. (look at how much the music adds to a movie like the dark knight) I have been playing various musical instruments for years and would like to see music add quite a bit to the game. I know many music majors at ISU as well as others that might be able to help. Just some additional thoughts...

pmasiar
September 2nd, 2008, 11:02 PM
Read http://sol.gfxile.net/mmorpg.html - rant against people with little experience aiming to create huge professional games. Just to hint you what odds are you facing for next 10 years.

If your timeframe is less than 10 years, join any of many existing projects :-)

LaRoza
September 2nd, 2008, 11:10 PM
For some time now I have had in idea that I thought would be interesting. Make a professional quality game, have it published by a major software company, and include support for linux. I realize that a single person would not be able to do this. My thought would be to setup a website that a group of programmers could essentially use as a swap space for files dealing with the game, and a discussion area for both the programmers and gamers who wanted to share ideas of how the game should be developed. I know this seems far fetched but IF a game was produced the people involved in its production could split a fair amount of money and it would be a good way to start including linux as a supported os for games. Any thoughts or suggestions?

See number 4: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=667422

What you are describing exists. Its called open source ;) The file sharing is sort of like CVS, SVN or git. Most projects would have a wiki as well.

First, realise that game programming is the goal of many, so commericially, there is never a loss for people to use. For open source, games are usually personal projects. I don't know what kind of games you want, but there exist many engines for various types of games.

The way you wrote your post, you seem either inexperienced in programming, or in open source development (or both...).

loganwm
September 2nd, 2008, 11:23 PM
If you're serious and devoted to learning how to do this, and how to work with others then you should create a road map for your goals on the path to creating your game.

Conceptualize - spend a fair amount of time writing down your plans for story, artwork, music, jot down notes, etc. You're not in a hurry, just give yourself time every once in a while to write down your ideas.

Research - Research what you need to accomplish (on a process to process basis) You should look into how you're going to accomplish certain tasks in C++ and how you'll obtain your music and graphics.

Pre-writing and planning is amazingly helpful.

Try to think on a "cellular" level. You need to have an idea of what your needs/problems will be before you invest too much time into a project.

shazard1
September 2nd, 2008, 11:27 PM
See number 4: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=667422

What you are describing exists. Its called open source ;) The file sharing is sort of like CVS, SVN or git. Most projects would have a wiki as well.

First, realise that game programming is the goal of many, so commericially, there is never a loss for people to use. For open source, games are usually personal projects. I don't know what kind of games you want, but there exist many engines for various types of games.

The way you wrote your post, you seem either inexperienced in programming, or in open source development (or both...).

You are right....I realize that I am not experienced when it comes to this kind of programming. and I would not try to start a project until I have enough experience to really make a good effort at making it work, BUT I want to explore the way that various people go about starting projects and get an idea of what is involved.

LaRoza
September 2nd, 2008, 11:28 PM
You are right....I realize that I am not experienced when it comes to this kind of programming. and I would not try to start a project until I have enough experience to really make a good effort at making it work, BUT I want to explore the way that various people go about starting projects and get an idea of what is involved.

Look at pmasiar's sig. That is his project which he started.

You can also find the System Restore thread here. It is an open source system restore program for Ubuntu, and it uses this forum for discussion and file sharing, although the project itself is hosted on sourceforge.

Wybiral
September 2nd, 2008, 11:31 PM
Whatever you do, DO NOT start writing a game engine, no game projects I've seen that start out with the intent to write their own engine have survived. There are dozens of good engines out there to use (many free and open-source as well), use one.

Kadrus
September 2nd, 2008, 11:37 PM
There are dozens of good engines out there to use (many free and open-source as well), use one.
Yup.Panda3D (http://panda3d.org)CMU's Engine is open source,it lets you code with Python and C++.
It's one among many:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

edit:An interesting Article from Stanford's website on Game Programming(Amit’s Game Programming Information (http://www-cs-students.stanford.edu/~amitp/gameprog.html))I suggest having a look at it.