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jvincent08
August 21st, 2008, 10:55 PM
I've been using Ubuntu for a while and I was curious to try out KDE 4 (the last time I tried it, it was 3.x), so instead of installing Kubuntu, I simply installed the KDE packages with Synaptic. After deciding I still liked Gnome better, I removed every KDE package I could find, with the exception of some libraries that were needed for a few KDE apps I use. Now while the computer is booting, I get a blue "Kubuntu" loading screen, instead of the Ubuntu one. I didn't know installing KDE packages would affect the boot screen. How can I get it back? TIA

tuxxy
August 21st, 2008, 10:57 PM
Heres a guide (http://technofreakatchennai.wordpress.com/2006/12/22/switching-between-ubuntukubuntuxubuntu-uspalsh/) to selecting which splash you want,

tangibleorange
August 21st, 2008, 10:58 PM
I've been using Ubuntu for a while and I was curious to try out KDE 4 (the last time I tried it, it was 3.x), so instead of installing Kubuntu, I simply installed the KDE packages with Synaptic. After deciding I still liked Gnome better, I removed every KDE package I could find, with the exception of some libraries that were needed for a few KDE apps I use. Now while the computer is booting, I get a blue "Kubuntu" loading screen, instead of the Ubuntu one. I didn't know installing KDE packages would affect the boot screen. How can I get it back? TIA

i can suggest only these three commands:


sudo apt-get purge kubuntu-artwork-usplash
sudo apt-get install usplash-theme-ubuntu
sudo update-initramfs -u

jvincent08
August 21st, 2008, 11:05 PM
Thanks guys! The commands tangibleorange provided did the trick.

oni5115
August 22nd, 2008, 06:55 AM
Is there a guide to making your own splash theme?

73ckn797
September 14th, 2008, 05:17 AM
Thanks for the information on usplash.

I had the very same issue and though it was not something that was of a critical nature, it was a minor irritant.

I have been exploring the Xfce and KDE environments and really prefer Gnome. With the exception of the Thunar File Manager, Gnome has all that I need.

Thunar does what I need for multiple file renaming and archiving (zip) in a simple and all-in-one environment. I upload over 25,000 photos a year and with Thunar I do not have to switch between several applications to accomplish all that I need to do.

Again, thanks for the information.

A little searching will usually find the answers to questions about the Ubuntu experience.