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View Full Version : [ubuntu] Advice. what do you think?



weverjames
August 21st, 2008, 06:36 PM
I want to hear from real people their thinking about buying a new computer loaded with ubuntu.
My question is cause I plan to buy a desktop and replace my laptop and I have mixed feelings about if it is worth to spend money in a brand new computer and go for linux. Linux in the past was supposed to be more popular as rescue OS in old machines. I do not know if there are a lot of people buying new pcs loaded with ubuntu or linux in general.
I have used ubuntu and linux for the last 2 years as my only os. I run away from windows as I was frustrated with the security issues, the low performance, the frozen screens, and so on.
I have had my difficult moments with ubuntu, for a sample, you just can search my username in this forum. But I guess now that I have been in linux for a while I have forgotten how bad windows is.
My problems with ubuntu are:
-I can not have video chat with anyone. My parents live in other country and have not seen them in 2 years. If i could find a way to have videoconference and audio conference would be a plus. AMSNs simply does not work. Linux should have a software that would allow this function, at least between linux plataform. I would convert my parents to ubuntu in a heart beat. However I have not found this functionality in linux.
-No ability to have my palm or pocket pc to work with linux. There is a lot a threads and suggestion, including hiting the sync button during the eclipse, but nthing works.
-No way to use cd softwares dessigned for window or mac.
But I still think the pros are more than the cons. Ubuntu is supposed to be free forever. Thats a good thing. It is supposed to be safe. I gives people that can not afford or can not waste their money, other option.
I made the mistake years ago of buying a macmini. That was my introduction and my exit from that world of coolness that only wants to suck your money from your pockets. They want you to paid for everything to reach a similar functionality than windows, and you will still be limited for incompatibility issues. and every year you will find your Os is already old, when they release a new animal from their zoo.
I heard Windows vienna is coming in 2009, and is going to be a new system from scratch, small, fast and secure as the best linux is now. Would that be the end of linux? Should I wait for viena? Is it stupid at all to spend the same money for a linux system if you can get a windows or mac system?

thomasaaron
August 21st, 2008, 07:38 PM
-I can not have video chat with anyone. My parents live in other country and have not seen them in 2 years. If i could find a way to have videoconference and audio conference would be a plus. AMSNs simply does not work. Linux should have a software that would allow this function, at least between linux plataform.

Have you tried Skype? Ekiga Softphone?


No ability to have my palm or pocket pc to work with linux.


Have you tried "Palm OS Devices" or JPilot? I believe even Evolution can be synced with a palm device.



No way to use cd softwares dessigned for window or mac.

If you mean software for burning CDs, Linux has a ton of that stuff. I'm not sure why you would need anything designed for Mac and Windows.


Is it stupid at all to spend the same money for a linux system if you can get a windows or mac system?

I used Windows for many years, and I would purchase a Linux machine over a Windows or Mac machine in a heartbeat. The thing is, while Linux is getting better literally on a daily basis, you still need to have the patience to learn it and explore its possibilities.

I virtualize Windows for cross-platform software testing. If it weren't for that, I'd have no use for it at all. While it is true that there is some industry-specific software that only runs on Windows at the moment, that will change as Open Source gains popularity.

In the end, how you spend your money is your choice. Go with your gutt. But we are here to help you in any way you can. Just ask.

pauper
August 21st, 2008, 11:39 PM
... when they release a new animal from their zoo.

:lol::lol::lol: That's a good one.


I heard Windows vienna is coming in 2009, and is going to be a new system from
scratch, small, fast and secure as the best linux is now. Would that be the
end of linux?

Of course not. As long as there are enthusiasts, who make free software, there is
always a room for an alternative. Besides no OS is perfect, content, bug-free.
So don't get too much into MS advertising hype.

"If debugging is the process of removing software bugs, then programming must
be the process of putting them in."--unknown author (?).

jeamer
August 22nd, 2008, 04:04 PM
Besides:


Contrary to rumors, Chris says, Windows 7 will not be using a new kernel. Instead the Windows Vista kernel will be refined and reused.

That was from www.windowsvienna.com . Will they ever learn?

Probably not.

thomasaaron
August 22nd, 2008, 04:09 PM
Thanks for the link. This was also on it...


A Microsoft spokesperson confirmed for WindowsVienna.com and Geekpedia.com that the development of Windows 7 will take approximately 3 years from the general availability of Windows Vista, which would put the release date somewhere in 2011.

I predict that by 2011, Ubuntu will be so phenomenal that windows 7 will have nothing on it at all. I can't wait.:popcorn:

ms277017
August 23rd, 2008, 01:21 PM
Quote:
... when they release a new animal from their zoo.


Oh mercy!! thats great man!!


Seriously though I have been swayed to the open source side of pc usage by a good friend... took like a year for me to see the truth, but windows is a steady decline into utter crap stability wise and security wise. and please, please do not get me started on "win macs" mac has always been geared torwards the person who lacks true technical understanding of computers in general. especially now that the hipsters all tote them around :twisted:

As the above poster said go with your gut. If you want to try a linux laptop from s76 go ahead man I bet you will not be dissapointed, however, I will add this side note... there is not a better deal imho on the www for a laptop of the three ranges s76 offers and IF you just hated linux you could always format and install windows in like 2 secs. again its up to you man.

glacialfury
August 23rd, 2008, 01:50 PM
I recently switched to Ubuntu as a main system. My university requires the use of MS Office 2007 and some other Windows-only means of communications, so it can be a trial at times. Regarding your questions (the ones I can answer):

1) Skype works perfectly for me; both video and sound. As a plus, it has a beautifully clean interface without the bloat of their Windows client (for now).

2) If you have a copy of Windows XP or other sitting around, you can install VirtualBox in ubuntu. This will let you install Windows *inside of* Ubuntu, instead of the bulkier way of dual booting. So you're toodling along in Ubuntu, and all of a sudden there's some software you need to run or a website that only accepts Windows, you start VirtualBox, which loads Windows literally inside a window, and you can use it. It does not emulate Windows, it *is* Windows, so compatibility is not a problem. You just can't use it for games etc because it doesn't actually use the hardware bits of your video card.

I'm not a Windows hater. The slowness, blue screens of death, etc that everyone uses as the typical "I hate Windows" speech - all of that can be avoided by regular maintenance and care. I never have those problems with Windows XP. I use both Ubuntu and Windows. Although you do pay for the Windows OS itself, you can find free, opensource alternatives for nearly everything on Windows just as well as Ubuntu. If it's a matter of philosophy - ie you want everything to be opensource etc - then yes, stick with Ubuntu and Linux. If it is a matter of practicality, and the philosophical arguments don't factor in, then the choice is just as simple - use whichever system has the greatest compatibility for your work. If that happens to be Windows, then you need to learn how to use it in a way that doesn't create constant maintenance problems.

lukjad007
August 23rd, 2008, 01:54 PM
I am going to get a new PC. I will have it built to my specs and install as many versions of Linux as can fit. I will most likely not ever install XP on that machine, but for CERTAIN I will never EVER install Vista.

glacialfury
August 24th, 2008, 03:34 PM
You don't need to install as many versions as will fit; if you want to try out different distros, download their "LiveCD"s. This will let you boot into a particular distro (like Ubuntu or OpenSUSE) and explore the system without having to install it. If you decide you want to keep it, you can install it from that LiveCD.

You can explore as many as you like without using harddrive space this way.

lukjad007
August 24th, 2008, 03:49 PM
True. But it's more fun to do 20 installs so that you can really get to know the different installers out there. (The most important reason is to have bragging rights. "I installed 32 different versions of Linux. Yessiree!")