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View Full Version : Don't be hasty when buying a new PC!



irv
August 8th, 2008, 10:37 PM
We sometimes get a little hasty when we need something in a hurry. This is exactly what I did. My old laptop died just when I was getting ready to make a trip to Africa. (It was running Ubuntu 8.04 almost flawless). Little to say, I loved it! I didn't have time to dig in and try to fix it. I just jumped to conclusions thinking that the motherboard failed. I'll get back to this in a minute. I ran out and bought a Dell 1521 at Best Buy. It came with Vista pre-installed. When I got back from my trip, I installed Ubuntu 8.04. I left Vista on the hard drive and did a dual boot. To my surprise I had all kinds of issues with the hardware. The wifi card, sound, video, cam, and etc. I finely un-installed it and went back to Vista. Vista will be a plus for Linux because it will drive everyone away from Windows. It is a bad OS.
My son runs a computer business so I told him the first chance you have to sell this laptop for me, do it. He told me today he had someone who was looking for a laptop to do one job, and he sounded like he might be interested in buying it.
Getting back to my old laptop. It turned out to be bad memory. I had a memory chip go bad. No big deal, I just sent it back to the manufacture and they replaced it free. My old laptop is running great again. In fact I am typing this on it. The reason I am posting this is to give a warning. If you are going to buy a new PC, laptop or desktop, make sure it will run Linux if that is what you want to use for an OS. I wish I would have done this.

Lord Xeb
August 8th, 2008, 11:50 PM
That is why I have spent 3 months check everything on the computer I want to build :P

Methuselah
August 9th, 2008, 12:31 AM
That is why I have spent 3 months check everything on the computer I want to build :P

I think I spent longer.
My relatives were teasing me about it.
I researched every component for quality and linux compatibility.
And at the same time I was looking for good prices.
The result is a computer that is fully functional with open source drivers (except 3D acceleration due to an X bug to be fixed in intrepid)

JawsThemeSwimming428
August 9th, 2008, 12:35 AM
It's not as hard as it used to be to find hardware that will work with most major linux distributions. Hardware compatibility has come a long way.

Methuselah
August 9th, 2008, 12:38 AM
It's not as hard as it used to be to find hardware that will work with most major linux distributions. Hardware compatibility has come a long way.

True, I basically narrowed it down to a mobo then checked all the built in components and they all were linux compatible.
And of course things like hard drives, optical, intel processors are rarely problems.

But I took my time, hunting for the best price and checking out various options.

brunovecchi
August 9th, 2008, 01:01 AM
I researched for over a month before buying myself a notebook with Ubuntu preinstalled... I even had to travel to a neighbouring city to get it. I could have bought it the first day at a regular shop and just hope that it worked with Linux, but I had a bad feeling and didn't rush myself.

I am extremely happy now, everything works smoothly. It was well worth the waiting. I agree with the OP 100%. If you choose wisely, you are going to work with that computer for years (and I am not talking about 2 or 3 years).

irv
August 9th, 2008, 01:12 AM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it the kernel that is the part of linux that supports or does not supports the hardware. And if that be the case, everytime new hardware comes out the kernel needs to catch-up. Maybe if someone has new hardware not supported by the kernel, if one would wait long enough it would be supported. I am just throwing this out here, I don't even know if I know what I'm talking about:-\"

FlyingIsFun1217
August 9th, 2008, 03:04 AM
isn't it the kernel that is the part of linux that supports or does not supports the hardware.

Sort of, but not really. It provides an abstraction layer for drivers (which are the actual chunks of code that CONTROL the hardware).

FlyingIsFun1217

macogw
August 9th, 2008, 01:12 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it the kernel that is the part of linux that supports or does not supports the hardware. And if that be the case, everytime new hardware comes out the kernel needs to catch-up. Maybe if someone has new hardware not supported by the kernel, if one would wait long enough it would be supported. I am just throwing this out here, I don't even know if I know what I'm talking about:-\"

Yep, that's why my laptop wasn't supported properly in Dapper (SD reader didn't work), but by Feisty worked fine. There are other card readers with the SD reader, and those are half-workable, from what I've heard of the development thus far. It's 2 years old. My new laptop has 3 pieces of incompatible hardware. For one, a driver is in the works. I need to email that guy again about testing the driver.

Inane_Asylum
August 9th, 2008, 02:03 PM
I bought a Toshiba Satellite A205-S5809 because my other laptop finally kicked the bucket with the intention of installing XP and Ubuntu with a dual-boot. Little did I know that neither of these OSes fully work on it. At least Ubuntu *mostly* works. XP ended up being pretty much an empty shell with no internet, display driver, USB support...pretty much anything.

Still can't get sound and WiFi working on Ubuntu, but working on it.

God, I hate Vista :mad:

zmjjmz
August 9th, 2008, 02:10 PM
Dell sells an Inspiron 1525 with Ubuntu pre-installed...