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TeeBird
July 28th, 2008, 10:34 PM
Hi there!

Dead set on getting a dedicated Ubuntu desktop box. Mac guy at home, PC guy at work, long time C++ and C developer and old timey Unix guy. Also guitar player who wants to record stuff and can't afford a Mac pro at 2700 bucks no monitor. Used to making do and finding workarounds. Recording with low end gear and software (Garageband) right now (on Macbook Pro), but looking forward to having some decent memory and speed and a bigger screen w/o stealing the wife's laptop. My personal Mac is an old G4 :(. Hoping to use Ubuntu Studio for low latency.

Looking at the Dell box as I have no clue how to build a decent box.

Just making sure I can post and seeing if anyone has comments. Thanks.

candtalan
July 28th, 2008, 11:26 PM
welcome!
The dell box should be ok - get a lot of ram if you can anyway, if you are doing music stuff, and a faster cpu if there is a choice.

DGortze380
July 28th, 2008, 11:38 PM
Hi there!

Dead set on getting a dedicated Ubuntu desktop box. Mac guy at home, PC guy at work, long time C++ and C developer and old timey Unix guy. Also guitar player who wants to record stuff and can't afford a Mac pro at 2700 bucks no monitor. Used to making do and finding workarounds. Recording with low end gear and software (Garageband) right now (on Macbook Pro), but looking forward to having some decent memory and speed and a bigger screen w/o stealing the wife's laptop. My personal Mac is an old G4 :(. Hoping to use Ubuntu Studio for low latency.

Looking at the Dell box as I have no clue how to build a decent box.

Just making sure I can post and seeing if anyone has comments. Thanks.

Building one wouldn't be that hard, but a Dell would be a good starting place if you don't want to build your own. Like the previous poster said, lots of RAM (not for Ubuntu, but for recording and multi-tasking). Dual core is a must at this point (and pretty much standard on Dells). Hard drive space for storage and an external for back-ups.

dhughes
July 28th, 2008, 11:42 PM
Nice to hear!

I'll be building a new system soon too, I may do as you are and just buy a ready made system since it may be cheaper but I've always built my own systems.


..get a lot of ram if you can anyway...

A lot meaning 3GB since anything over 3.5GB (isn't it?) would require a 64-bit OS and 64-bit versions of whatever programs you'll be using. I'd suggest spending the money meant for 4GB on a bigger and faster hard drive or faster CPU.

As for distributions you may want to give 64Studio a try it's a Linux distribution that's pretty much all just music applications already installed. Like the Ubuntu family it's based on Debian Linux.

http://64studio.com/

DGortze380
July 28th, 2008, 11:44 PM
Nice to hear!

I'll be building a new system soon too, I may do as you are and just buy a ready made system since it may be cheaper but I've always built my own systems.



A lot meaning 3GB since anything over 3.5GB (isn't it?) would require a 64-bit OS and 64-bit versions of whatever programs you'll be using. I'd suggest spending the money meant for 4GB on a bigger and faster hard drive or faster CPU.

As for distributions you may want to give 64Studio a try it's a Linux distribution that's pretty much all just music applications already installed. Like the Ubuntu family it's based on Debian Linux.

http://64studio.com/

May just be me, but my rule of thumb for RAM is, "as much as you can afford." These days DDR2 is so cheap I wouldn't build a system with less than 4GB.

TeeBird
July 28th, 2008, 11:57 PM
Thanks, this is great. I was going to go with 2Gb but will consider 4 now. Was planning to get Core Duo Processor E4600 (2MB L2 Cache,2.4GHz,800 FSB).

Probably the 320Gb disk.

DGortze380
July 29th, 2008, 12:36 AM
Thanks, this is great. I was going to go with 2Gb but will consider 4 now. Was planning to get Core Duo Processor E4600 (2MB L2 Cache,2.4GHz,800 FSB).

Probably the 320Gb disk.

Check out http://www.newegg.com/
A lot of times it's cheaper to upgrade things like RAM and Hard Drives yourself afterwards. Just be sure the system you buy will support the upgrades. If you're not sure, post here.

dhughes
July 29th, 2008, 12:49 AM
May just be me, but my rule of thumb for RAM is, "as much as you can afford." These days DDR2 is so cheap I wouldn't build a system with less than 4GB.

Yes I agree that would be nice but x86 hardware be it for Mac, Windows or Linux due to hardware limitations cannot use any RAM over 3.4GB unless the OS is 64-bit, it's just a waste of money.

As I mentioned above but never thought about until later the 64Studio is available in a 64-bit version so TeeBird if you try that use the 64-bit version, especially if you have more than 4GB of RAM.

TeeBird
July 29th, 2008, 12:50 PM
Looks like newegg has some hardware finder wizards. Great! I'll take advantage of this. Thanks again.

Cadmus
July 29th, 2008, 01:01 PM
Would there be any problems using a 64-bit version of Ubuntu for what this fellow is after? Then you don't have the RAM cap.

Or for x86 could you just use the sevrer kernel?

linux6994
July 29th, 2008, 01:09 PM
You also look at tigerdirect.com they often have great deals. I have 2 desktops that old emachines with 2GB RAM one is a 2400+ the other a 3000+ and they run Ubuntu great!

DGortze380
July 29th, 2008, 04:00 PM
Would there be any problems using a 64-bit version of Ubuntu for what this fellow is after? Then you don't have the RAM cap.

Or for x86 could you just use the sevrer kernel?

As long as he's open to learning how to compile some software 64-bit would be a very good choice IMO.