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View Full Version : [ubuntu] [SOLVED] How can I make a user which cannot use 'sudo'?



Masoris
July 28th, 2008, 05:39 PM
I want to make a user(account) which cannot be a administrator like a guest user. How can I make it?

markjensen
July 28th, 2008, 05:41 PM
Just create a new account. If you don't add it into sudoers, it will not be able to authorize. I have a kids account for just that purpose on my computer, so the kids can use it when I am here at work.


EDIT: The new account must have a password. I am sure there are ways to turn that feature off, but I just told my kids what the kid account password is.

eightmillion
July 28th, 2008, 05:41 PM
I think that new users can't sudo by default. You normally have to specifically allow them.

halitech
July 28th, 2008, 05:43 PM
System - Administration - users and groups

click add user

fill in the information, set type to Unpriviledged and click okay

hrod beraht
July 28th, 2008, 05:45 PM
System --> Administration --> Users and Groups

Add User, but on the User Privileges tab of the new user, uncheck which privileges that you don't want them to have. e.g. Administer the System.

Bob

Masoris
July 28th, 2008, 05:55 PM
Just create a new account. If you don't add it into sudoers, it will not be able to authorize. I have a kids account for just that purpose on my computer, so the kids can use it when I am here at work.
You mean new account cannot use 'sudo' default. So what should I do to make user which can do 'sudo'?

markjensen
July 28th, 2008, 05:59 PM
As above, the abilites of the new user can be set at time of creation.

If they are a "sudoer", then they are allowed to use "sudo" to perform system tasks. It sounds like you don't want this.

bodhi.zazen
July 28th, 2008, 06:21 PM
With Ubuntu sudo is configured such that members of the admin group have root access (via sudo).

By default, the first user on the system is a member of the admin group.

By default, new users are not.

To give new users admin access , add them to the admin group (you need to log out and back in for changes to take effect).

The alternate is to configure sudo (sudo can be configured to give access to alternate groups or single commands).