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View Full Version : Do you like a little bloat?



gunashekar
July 23rd, 2008, 03:35 AM
I was experimenting with different CMS when I realized that I actually like a little bloat when it comes to OS or software. What about you?

Dr Small
July 23rd, 2008, 03:36 AM
No. I loath bloat.

Joeb454
July 23rd, 2008, 03:38 AM
It depends how powerful the machine is ;)

Dr Small
July 23rd, 2008, 03:39 AM
It depends how powerful the machine is ;)
Mine is powerful enough, but I don't like to wade through menu's or hog my RAM. :D

-grubby
July 23rd, 2008, 03:40 AM
As long as it's useful bloat, it's fine.

Happy_Man
July 23rd, 2008, 03:41 AM
Bleh, bloat. Hate its guts. You should see my Windows install, it's beautiful. I think it's faster than Ubuntu Hardy (which never really seems to work for me, 'tis why I'm a Windows man until Intrepid).

gunashekar
July 23rd, 2008, 03:41 AM
sorry about the typo ion the title of the post. i meant: Do you like a little bloat?

Dr Small
July 23rd, 2008, 03:41 AM
As long as it's useful bloat, it's fine.
... and when is bloat useful? :)

cardinals_fan
July 23rd, 2008, 03:44 AM
I hate bloat. Automation is usually good, although you should do things manually at least once in order to understand them.

tuxxy
July 23rd, 2008, 03:46 AM
GNOME mean and lean for me :)

frup
July 23rd, 2008, 03:55 AM
What do you define as bloat?

I define bloat as apps that use excessive resources to complete their functions and having excessive features that have no real use.

While having bluetooth stuff on my ubuntu install is bloat to me, I like it being there for others. I would prefer to be able to choose to install/install stuff like that after first boot though.

I don't use evolution, is that bloat for me? is it bloat for you, I certainly wouldn't approve of it being removed from Ubuntu.

Does having Kubuntu, Ubuntu and Xubuntu equate to a bloating of developer resources? I prefer the choice.

The fact that Konqueror and Dolphin can both be filemanagers might be bloat too?

FuturePilot
July 23rd, 2008, 04:00 AM
Yes it depends on what you mean by bloat. If you mean bloat as in X application uses an absurd amount of system resources for no good reason, then no I hate bloat. But if you mean X application is loaded with useful features and is a swiss army knife sort of app, then yes I love bloat. :D

zmjjmz
July 23rd, 2008, 04:06 AM
Depends on the system for me.
If it's on my Macbook, fine, I can stand some bloat.
If it's on my 586 with 16MB RAM, no bloat plzkthxbai.

ghindo
July 23rd, 2008, 04:10 AM
Define bloat please.

keiichidono
July 23rd, 2008, 04:16 AM
What do you define as bloat?

I define bloat as apps that use excessive resources to complete their functions and having excessive features that have no real use.

While having bluetooth stuff on my ubuntu install is bloat to me, I like it being there for others. I would prefer to be able to choose to install/install stuff like that after first boot though.

I don't use evolution, is that bloat for me? is it bloat for you, I certainly wouldn't approve of it being removed from Ubuntu.

Does having Kubuntu, Ubuntu and Xubuntu equate to a bloating of developer resources? I prefer the choice.

The fact that Konqueror and Dolphin can both be filemanagers might be bloat too?


Yes it depends on what you mean by bloat. If you mean bloat as in X application uses an absurd amount of system resources for no good reason, then no I hate bloat. But if you mean X application is loaded with useful features and is a swiss army knife sort of app, then yes I love bloat. :D


Define bloat please.

This is just what I was about to say. It seem him and I have different views of what the word "bloat" means.

geoken
July 23rd, 2008, 04:31 AM
If you like a feature then isn't it by definition not bloat?

poofyhairguy
July 23rd, 2008, 04:43 AM
I like bloat. It has some upsides. Thanks to software bloat my current computer is 100,000 more powerful than my first.

Plus bloat makes me work harder, and that is good sometimes. Firefox 2 made me work a little overtime to get four gigs of RAM. (What was I gonna do, not use Firefox? Not open seven windows with 30 tabs each? No way!)

But it is cool when software becomes less bloat. Like how Firefox 3 hauls on my current system.

wolfen69
July 23rd, 2008, 05:53 AM
i don't think it matters too much if you have enough ram. i usually have over 150 processes running, and use 400+ MB's of ram. so what? i have 2 gigs of ram. and my computer hums along nicely. bring on the "bloat".

sstusick
July 23rd, 2008, 05:56 AM
I prefer as little bloat as possible. I'd rather bloat the system up, myself.

LaRoza
July 23rd, 2008, 06:07 AM
sorry about the typo ion the title of the post. i meant: Do you like a little bloat?

Took pity on the title...

genexxa27
July 23rd, 2008, 06:13 AM
I don't mind a little bloat myself either. I'm not a person that uses terminal very much i like the GUI way of things it works the best for me. Mostly because i don't really understand it. And i love the the way i can decorate my desktop i think its pretty cool and my kids like it too lol.I guess the easier things are on me the better i like my Ubuntu experience.:)

Inxsible
July 23rd, 2008, 06:16 AM
Like mentioned already, bloat is different for different machines.

for eg. Debian installed bluetooth packages on my old 256MB P3 machine. When I bought that machine 8 years ago...most phones didn't have bluetooth option..so forget about the computers. Bluetooth therefore is bloat on that machine and I promptly removed it.

But I would not work without bluetooth on my new machine where I use it for my mouse and also to connect to my phones etc.


Also, I like my machines to be lean, the less memory that is consumed, the better. That leaves me with more RAM available for my other critical apps like running apache server, eclipse and running multiple jvms while coding.

hellion0
July 23rd, 2008, 06:30 AM
Depends on the bloat. If it's bloat I put there myself, then yes. If it's bloat I get saddled with from install, without wanting it, then no.

gunashekar
July 23rd, 2008, 06:33 AM
Took pity on the title...

Thanks for the sympathy.

gunashekar
July 23rd, 2008, 01:10 PM
Looks like LaRoza or some mod acted on pity and corrected the title. I am grateful!. Teaches a lesson to be careful about the title while posting. Mistakes in the post itself can be edited.

eragon100
July 23rd, 2008, 01:39 PM
I use Ubuntu ultimate 1.8 gamer's edition, so no I don't mind to have a lot of programs installed and ready to go, even if I don't use all of them :)

I don't like bload as in an app that uses tons of resources, such as vista.
But that's the same between ubuntu normal and ubuntu ultimate :popcorn:

Bungo Pony
July 23rd, 2008, 02:01 PM
Way back in the day (and I'm talking about earlier than 640K) programmers used to make an effort to eliminate system resource hogging and RAM gobbling. They had no choice but to make their code as efficient as possible.

My second computer was a Commodore Vic-20. It had a total of 3.5k of RAM available to the user. It was typical for me to run out of RAM while I was programming. A lot of times, I had to go back through my code and minimize whatever I could to make it fit into RAM. And when you're loading programs off a cassette tape, you don't want to be waiting forever.

Nowadays with the ability to have tons of RAM to spare and gallons of hard drive space to use, nobody needs to bother with trimming down their software.

eragon100
July 23rd, 2008, 02:09 PM
Way back in the day (and I'm talking about earlier than 640K) programmers used to make an effort to eliminate system resource hogging and RAM gobbling. They had no choice but to make their code as efficient as possible.

My second computer was a Commodore Vic-20. It had a total of 3.5k of RAM available to the user. It was typical for me to run out of RAM while I was programming. A lot of times, I had to go back through my code and minimize whatever I could to make it fit into RAM. And when you're loading programs off a cassette tape, you don't want to be waiting forever.

Nowadays with the ability to have tons of RAM to spare and gallons of hard drive space to use, nobody needs to bother with trimming down their software.

Game programmers still have to bother with it, right?

Dr Small
July 23rd, 2008, 02:22 PM
Way back in the day (and I'm talking about earlier than 640K) programmers used to make an effort to eliminate system resource hogging and RAM gobbling. They had no choice but to make their code as efficient as possible.

My second computer was a Commodore Vic-20. It had a total of 3.5k of RAM available to the user. It was typical for me to run out of RAM while I was programming. A lot of times, I had to go back through my code and minimize whatever I could to make it fit into RAM. And when you're loading programs off a cassette tape, you don't want to be waiting forever.

Nowadays with the ability to have tons of RAM to spare and gallons of hard drive space to use, nobody needs to bother with trimming down their software.
And that results in less efficient programs.

Onyros
July 23rd, 2008, 02:24 PM
I HATE bloat. Whenever I have a machine that boots to over 100MB of RAM, I know something's wrong, and the most I tolerate is around 85MB. If there's a service hogging that much memory, I'll always try to find a replacement.

Imagine my dismay when I read an article on Tuxmachines in which someone mentions his machine boots to 1GB of RAM. That's... uncanny for me, I can't fathom that.

Needless to say, none of my current systems need more than 1GB of RAM, and it's (very, very, very) rarely over 500MB of RAM used for me. The only usage I have for more than 1GB is virtualization, and even then I try to use just around 256MB in virtual machines (which usually is enough).

So, when I try an app I test it for speed and RAM usage, always. That's why I tend to shy away from, e.g., Python apps. I usually find alternatives which are faster and use much less RAM. I even have a few GTK1 fetish apps (old version of Beaver is one, now it's been ported to GTK2, guess who won't upgrade).

Joeb454
July 23rd, 2008, 02:24 PM
Some programmers take great pride in using less RAM. Especially if it's a commonly used application (i.e. web browser). For example the RAM useage of Firefox has gone down in FF3 :)

And Dr Small, I have 2GB ram, so I'm not fussed that I usually use around 500Mb of it :p I did pay for it after all

Dr Small
July 23rd, 2008, 02:26 PM
Some programmers take great pride in using less RAM. Especially if it's a commonly used application (i.e. web browser). For example the RAM useage of Firefox has gone down in FF3 :)

And Dr Small, I have 2GB ram, so I'm not fussed that I usually use around 500Mb of it :p I did pay for it after all
Currently, I am using 118MBs of my 833MBs of RAM (according to Conky).

SomeGuyDude
July 23rd, 2008, 02:46 PM
If "bloat" is software that isn't needed (which is how I think of it), then I hate it.

If it means non-essential software that still can be useful then I figure there's a reason I have 2GB of RAM in here.

billgoldberg
July 23rd, 2008, 02:53 PM
I like installing software myself, so the less bloat the better.

So after installing Ubuntu, I have my work cut out deleting unnecessary stuff.

chucky chuckaluck
July 23rd, 2008, 02:57 PM
i use whatever makes my life easier. i don't do a whole lot of things with my computer, so simple programs are usually enough. xterm, cplay, htop, are good enough for my needs in those areas. on the other hand, i've had enough trouble with cd burning software (won't install, something's missing, there are no ****ing instructions on how to use the **** thing, etc.), i just gave up and went with k3b, which i think is terrific and have never had one bit of trouble with. for file management, i'll use the commandline for some of it and thunar for the rest. thunar does everything i want it to in a way i understand. something like mc is just too odd and not as useful to me, so i opt for a little more bloat. there's no substitue for gimp. i'll use nano most of the time, but i'll use leafpad if i'm making changes that need to be tested, or if i'm changing a theme and need to see how the changes come out. 'replace' is a nice feature when changing colors of themes, or changing keybindings that come with a default i don't like. i use firefox instead of elinks. let's face it, there's a lot of visual stuff on the internet that makes using a text browser just a little too absurdly spartan.

Dr Small
July 23rd, 2008, 03:06 PM
No. I loath bloat.
To follow up my statement, here is my old system, as minimalistic as possible :)
http://php.8ez.com/drsmall/blog/wp-content/dscf0152_small.JPG

dracule
July 23rd, 2008, 03:09 PM
nonessential software like compiz: Fine by me!


unneeded POS (like the damn Vongo crap that pops up everytime i reinstall XP): Hate it with a passion.

ukripper
July 23rd, 2008, 03:10 PM
Every application is a bloat unless you use OS/app written in assembly.
living example is http://www.menuetos.net/index.htm
:)

NovaAesa
July 23rd, 2008, 03:53 PM
Nothing wrong with a bit of bloat. My PC is a beast - 2GiB RAM and an Intel Core 2 Duo. I might as well use all that power on something, even if it is just bloaty eye-candy.

zachtib
July 23rd, 2008, 03:56 PM
I don't mind bloat in the sense that I prefer to use a full DE rather than one of the *box window managers.