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Sealbhach
July 10th, 2008, 11:46 PM
http://live.gnome.org/OnlineDesktop

http://www.noboxmedia.com/11/web20-online-desktops/

If people use the internet more and more for their personal files and apps, perhaps the desktop is fast becoming obsolete?

Meaning that the OS you use to access the internet is not really that important....

.

zmjjmz
July 10th, 2008, 11:50 PM
I read a column in eWeek saying that web browsers need to step up on stability before Web 2.0 trumps the desktop.
Like, if a web app crashes in one tab, it shouldn't take out the entire browser.

fatality_uk
July 10th, 2008, 11:58 PM
http://live.gnome.org/OnlineDesktop

http://www.noboxmedia.com/11/web20-online-desktops/

If people use the internet more and more for their personal files and apps, perhaps the desktop is fast becoming obsolete?

Meaning that the OS you use to access the internet is not really that important....

.

Nope. For home users maybe, but a business wouldn't, at this moment in time, rely on mission critical software delivered over the web.

mr.propre
July 10th, 2008, 11:59 PM
Web application will surly change the way we work but an OS will still be needed and the option to work offline to.

zmjjmz
July 11th, 2008, 12:00 AM
Also, today's internet speeds and prices are just unable to deliver that kind of functionality comfortably.
It may not be fair, but the ISP's are being jackasses.

acelin
July 11th, 2008, 12:02 AM
I do not want any of my stuff on the internet. Nothing. I want my files, my programs, my settings, all on a computer I can have offline as well. Tell the cloud to rain.

Lord Xeb
July 11th, 2008, 12:08 AM
I am not really getting the point of an online desktop...

zmjjmz
July 11th, 2008, 12:11 AM
I do not want any of my stuff on the internet. Nothing. I want my files, my programs, my settings, all on a computer I can have offline as well. Tell the cloud to rain.

I totally agree with you except in 2 conditions:
a) The files are encrypted with my own password not stored anywhere except in my head.
b) The company hosting the web app has a very good privacy policy.

I think it will take over in places where the content itself is not private or anything, and if it's more convenient than using a desktp one (I don't think having your own bit of space for it or anything is useful, your computer has a hard drive for a reason!)

Midwest-Linux
July 11th, 2008, 12:28 AM
No, for two reasons. The question of privacy and potential privacy loss and identity theft issues need to be addressed. If one stores several GB of files online, what guarantee is there that someone, somewhere has the potential to access those files other than you?

The minute you let data out of your physical building or surroundings, it is out of your hands period and you have to rely on someone else word or some company's promise it "will be safe".

Another issue is the growing problem of "bandwidth caps" imposed by the ISP's, suppose you have 20 GB of data online. And you need to access all 20 GB for some reason, but you already used 5 GB this month and your cap is 10 GB. Guess what? You are SOL.

While "cloud computing" and "online desktops" probably have their place. Unless the security issues and bandwidth "caps" are dealt with. Then this method is not ready for prime time. And whether or not it will "kill Microsoft" is irrelevant.

zmjjmz
July 11th, 2008, 12:44 AM
I highly doubt that it will kill Microsoft.
The computers will still need an operating system and a good web browser.
So all MS has to do is create a bare OS with a bunch of links and an improved version of IE, and they're in business.
They may lose 50% of their revenue from MS Office, but they could easily provide pay-for subscription based access to an online version of MS Office.

Actually, it will take a lot of breath out of under-funded OSS projects.
Now you need a powerful datacenter and a hosting provider to get your software out there instead of just a single little page on Google Code or Sourceforge or Freshmeat.

MellonCollie
July 11th, 2008, 12:49 AM
I read a column in eWeek saying that web browsers need to step up on stability before Web 2.0 trumps the desktop.
Like, if a web app crashes in one tab, it shouldn't take out the entire browser.

IE8 handles crashed tabs; I'm sure other browsers will follow suit.

billgoldberg
July 11th, 2008, 01:09 AM
http://live.gnome.org/OnlineDesktop

http://www.noboxmedia.com/11/web20-online-desktops/

If people use the internet more and more for their personal files and apps, perhaps the desktop is fast becoming obsolete?

Meaning that the OS you use to access the internet is not really that important....

.

Me, storing my personal files online?

Yeah right.

Hell would freeze over sooner.

Sure some people don't care about privacy online and upload their whole live to some servers they don't even own, well not me.

ps, the gnome online desktop has been around for a long time. I don't think it was/is very successful.

FuturePilot
July 11th, 2008, 02:34 AM
I am not really getting the point of an online desktop...

Me either. Online desktops and web apps in general are not very functional in terms of features and are slow. Besides, wouldn't an online desktop pretty much make that 4GB of RAM and quad core processor useless? I mean we're constantly adding more cores to CPUs, RAM is always getting cheaper, and hard drives are constantly growing in size. So we are going to move to an online desktop? :confused:

Foster Grant
July 11th, 2008, 02:39 AM
I totally agree with you except in 2 conditions:
a) The files are encrypted with my own password not stored anywhere except in my head.
b) The company hosting the web app has a very good privacy policy.


Not even then. I want my files and apps on my own PC because they're more secure there (any online storage can be hacked behind your back) and because ... let's face it, there are instances when we have no choice but to be offline but still want to use our computers to do work or play games.

MaxIBoy
July 11th, 2008, 02:52 AM
Not gonna happen until the Internet is faster and cheaper than a hard drive. In other words, never, because even if the internet gets really fast, the server itself is still going to need a hard drive. So it's either

Pay a monthly fee for access to a server to store stuff on (speed = speed of hard drive AND Internet put together) or
Pay about the same amount as one monthly server access payment for a hard drive that you own (speed = speed of hard drive without the extra delay of the Internet.)

phaed
July 11th, 2008, 03:49 AM
Will online desktops kill Microsoft or any of the other operating systems? No, you still need an OS on your hdd to access your online OS, and if it already comes with apps like an email client, instant messaging client, word processor, etc., why not use what you already have? As long as apps on different operating systems are intercompatible and/or can read the same files, I certainly don't need an online OS? Is anybody suffering from not being able to access stuff from multiple computers? I just email most things to myself.

Now, if you could have an option in your bootloader to boot from an online operating system, that would be interesting.

allforcarrie
July 11th, 2008, 03:54 AM
WNo, you still need an OS on your hdd to access your online OS

that, is only a matter of time.

Foster Grant
July 11th, 2008, 03:56 AM
that, is only a matter of time.

Yeah, we're headed back to the ancient era of dumb terminals (http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/D/dumb_terminal.html).

How about no?

zmjjmz
July 11th, 2008, 04:33 AM
Those things make sense if you're like at a school or something, but otherwise they're useless.

MaxIBoy
July 11th, 2008, 04:36 AM
Even if it happened, it wouldn't kill Microsoft. Microsoft has been trying to introduce this model of distribution for a while now. That way they can lease out all your programs and even your computer, making much more money and holding more of a monopoly.

zmjjmz
July 11th, 2008, 04:39 AM
Even if it happened, it wouldn't kill Microsoft. Microsoft has been trying to introduce this model of distribution for a while now. That way they can lease out all your programs and even your computer, making much more money and holding more of a monopoly.

They'd become just as bad as Comcast.

tashmooclam
July 11th, 2008, 04:40 AM
Eventually the online things like Googledocs/apps will hurt Microsoft, as will Openoffice. The problem is the inertia is to just buy and use Microsoft, consumers are amazingly informed about HDTV standards, yet don't know about computers. A few weeks ago I found that I could put Googledocs on my desktop too and use it "offline"! Very cool.

jrusso2
July 11th, 2008, 08:12 AM
I do not want any of my stuff on the internet. Nothing. I want my files, my programs, my settings, all on a computer I can have offline as well. Tell the cloud to rain.

What makes you think its already not there?

VitaLiNux
July 11th, 2008, 04:03 PM
Not even then. I want my files and apps on my own PC because they're more secure there (any online storage can be hacked behind your back) and because ... let's face it, there are instances when we have no choice but to be offline but still want to use our computers to do work or play games.

I agree with most of people here. An online desktop would make just useless a powerful, high end computer should our files and applications are located online. So I personally don't see the point of an online desktop so far... Well, if that's the original idea behind this...:confused:

Mateo
July 13th, 2008, 07:59 PM
The point is not to do everything on the web (which is not the same as the internet). The point is to integrate the desktop and the web together. There are certain things that the web is better at and there are certain things the desktop is better at. Personally I find the "desktop apps on the web" to be less interesting than the "web apps on the desktop". GoogleDocs is fine for collaboration and such, but is anyone going to seriously drop their Word Processor or Spreadsheet application for it? I've used the spreadsheet a little bit and like I said for collaboration it is great, but is much slower to navigate and use than Gnumeric.

On the other hand, the web apps that are coming to the desktop are fantastic. There are just certain things the web can never give you. The web can never send notifications, unless you keep a tab for that particular website open all the time. That's why people install a Gmail applet (or use Evolution). The web alone is not good enough for email. Also you have things like gtwitter which makes it much easier to use twitter. The Blackberry has a facebook app that sends notifications to you. Notifications are just one of the major ways that the web and desktop are merging. But the desktop will always be a major part of it.