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BWF89
November 2nd, 2005, 01:31 PM
Ah I beat you to it, I set up evolution and gave him a gmail account, he also has googletalk now
What's the big deal over these email programs like Evolution and Outlook? Why don't people just go to the site their email is hosted on (Gmail.google.com) and check it there?

Teroedni
November 2nd, 2005, 01:34 PM
yea i cant get it either.:confused:
Gmail is so much better:)

23meg
November 2nd, 2005, 01:39 PM
What's the big deal over these email programs like Evolution and Outlook? Why don't people just go to the site their email is hosted on (Gmail.google.com) and check it there?

Because of the advantages of keeping a local copy of your email: you can read/write mail even when you're not online, you can search a local mailbox much faster, and it provides better privacy if you choose to delete messages after retrieval. I've always used email this way.

Btw, gmail can work with POP3 (thus with Evolution, Thunderbird etc.) as well. It just happens to have a web interface, like many other mail hosts.

Lovechild
November 2nd, 2005, 01:57 PM
The big point is that when you click a mailto: link it works, beagle indexes your mail (and that is way faster than logging on to gmail and using their search), I can sync mail/addressebook/calendar/todo list with my palm using evolution.

webmail is nice for checking mail when you are away from home but at home, Evolution beats webmail hands down.

majikstreet
November 2nd, 2005, 10:10 PM
The big point is that when you click a mailto: link it works, beagle indexes your mail (and that is way faster than logging on to gmail and using their search), I can sync mail/addressebook/calendar/todo list with my palm using evolution.

webmail is nice for checking mail when you are away from home but at home, Evolution beats webmail hands down.
there is an extension to let mailto: links go to gmail btw...

aysiu
November 2nd, 2005, 10:19 PM
I use Thunderbird for several reasons:

1. I have a lot of different email accounts, and I don't want to have five or six tabs open in Firefox to keep track of them, with pages refreshing (using a lot of bandwidth) every few minutes. I'd rather have them all in one place, so I can see them. A nice little notifier in my system tray tells me if any of them have new messages.

2. I can also easily choose to reply to an email in one account using a "from" address from another account, which I sometimes do, for my own reasons. Can't do that with webmail.

3. I like having a separate web browsing and email experience. When I close Firefox, I'm done with my web browsing. I still want my email to keep going, though. Sure, I could have two Firefox windows up, but then I'd have to keep track of which one was the email one and which one was the web browsing one.

4. Not all of us have/use Gmail. Other webmail hosts (my workplace's, for example) are extremely slow when checked through a web browser but much faster (even IMAP) when checked with an email client.

5. Thunderbird beta's newest feature--the ability to detach or delete attachments from an email while still keeping the email. I don't know if Gmail can do this, but none of my other webmail accounts can without Thunderbird.

6. An easy way to deal with junk-mail messages. You press J, and they're marked as junk and deleted with that one key stroke.

7. If you're in the middle of composing a message (even using IMAP and not POP), you won't lose your message just because your internet connection goes.

Is that enough reasons for you?

gw90se
November 2nd, 2005, 10:36 PM
For the same reason, we are all here. Each has their own preference. Mine is also multiple e-mail accounts and automated checking at intervals, so if I am busy doing other work and I get a message, it comes through.

majikstreet
November 2nd, 2005, 10:51 PM
A nice little notifier in my system tray tells me if any of them have new messages.
In thunderbird???!

I wish I could minimize it to the tray...

That's what alltray is for I guess...

PatrickMay16
November 2nd, 2005, 11:02 PM
What's the big deal over these email programs like Evolution and Outlook? Why don't people just go to the site their email is hosted on (Gmail.google.com) and check it there?
Because using an email client program is a lot quicker. It's a lot quicker to click the evolution icon and instantly start downloading any new messages than opening firefox, typing "gmail.google.com", then entering my username and password, etc.

aysiu
November 2nd, 2005, 11:04 PM
In thunderbird???!

I wish I could minimize it to the tray...

That's what alltray is for I guess... You can. See my thread on Thunderbird: new mail in notification area? (http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=63094)

blastus
November 2nd, 2005, 11:18 PM
I use an email client for anything important instead of webmail for all of the reasons above plus:

- It is just more convenient to have a local copy of your emails when you only use one machine, but if you use multiple computers (like a desktop and laptop), and/or need to access email from abroad, then webmail or IMAP is the way to go.

- Having a local copy of your emails also provides security against your webmail or IMAP provider going out of business.

- I haven't looked around that much, but I have not seen a single webmail provider provide a free service where they did not advertise in your account and didn't force you to login every 30 days.

- I'm not always connected to the Internet and I'm on dialup--webmail is just too damn slow.

From my experience, the providers I have dealt with, Hotmail and Netscape, are problematic. Spam is a huge problem on Hotmail. I've signed up for new accounts on Hotmail and have been flooded with spam in a matter of hours and I had not even used the account. Netscape is an unreliable webmail service. Over the last couple of years there have been periods of several months at a time where I could not send any email--they've also lost email too. Furthermore, I have had problems with session timeouts. I spend some time composing an email, click on send, and then get a "your session has expired message" and lose my email in the process.

BWF89
November 2nd, 2005, 11:20 PM
Someone took my post and forked a new thread on the subject.

If I read my Gmail with a client do I have all the options I would have with Gmail, like the ability to add a star to my letter and put it in the starred folder?

aysiu
November 2nd, 2005, 11:38 PM
Someone took my post and forked a new thread on the subject. That was me. I felt your post was off-topic but worthy of a new thread, so I made one.

majikstreet
November 2nd, 2005, 11:48 PM
I wonder if I can do that tray thing in fluxbox..

Anyway, I'm going to try Evolution, because I would like a calendar too.

EDIT: Gmail's pop seems to be very slow..

kvidell
November 3rd, 2005, 12:01 AM
I use GMAIL for... gmail... and for my shiftyeyed.net e-mail I use pine on the web hosting box.

I think this is the best setup I've found yet.
I never use mailto: links... ever... so that's not something I'm worried about in the least.

I do _not_ like evolution, thunderbird, etc... I'm a elm/pine/mutt man.
- Kev

ember
November 3rd, 2005, 12:15 AM
Hmm ... I find Thunderbird generally much more comfortable than any web-based email I met (yes, I own a Google Mail account). I prefer doing most things over imap and if I manage to set up my own IMAP and LDAP server, things will get even more comfortable.
I frankly didn't like webmail at any time, so for me the question was alwas the other way around.

Best,
ember

majikstreet
November 3rd, 2005, 12:36 AM
I'd like to setup my own IMAP/POP3 and SMTP server :) I haven't been successful yet though...

I've been using evolution, and it's nice..

Gmail's POP is pretty slow though. And I get errors sometimes with gmail's pop.

xequence
November 3rd, 2005, 01:12 AM
Because using an email client program is a lot quicker. It's a lot quicker to click the evolution icon and instantly start downloading any new messages than opening firefox, typing "gmail.google.com", then entering my username and password, etc.

No, its not faster :P You dont have to log into web mail every time, thats what cookies are for. Evolution took forever to load for me. Opera takes a couple seconds, I type in gmail.com and it takes me there and I see my messages. If I am using my computer the only time I would ever not use a browser would be if I didnt want it to affect a torrent's downloading speed.


7. If you're in the middle of composing a message (even using IMAP and not POP), you won't lose your message just because your internet connection goes.


You wont loose it on gmail. You can have a page open, type something in, and unplug your ethernet cable, and still have the message in the text box right there. If you click send, it will give you a little message "Cannot connect to server" but you will still have your message sitting in the textbox there. You can save it in gedit or anything.


1. I have a lot of different email accounts, and I don't want to have five or six tabs open in Firefox to keep track of them, with pages refreshing (using a lot of bandwidth) every few minutes. I'd rather have them all in one place, so I can see them. A nice little notifier in my system tray tells me if any of them have new messages.

Heh, thats why you use a client and I use a browser :P I have only one e-mail account.


From my experience, the providers I have dealt with, Hotmail and Netscape, are problematic. Spam is a huge problem on Hotmail. I've signed up for new accounts on Hotmail and have been flooded with spam in a matter of hours and I had not even used the account. Netscape is an unreliable webmail service. Over the last couple of years there have been periods of several months at a time where I could not send any email--they've also lost email too. Furthermore, I have had problems with session timeouts. I spend some time composing an email, click on send, and then get a "your session has expired message" and lose my email in the process.

I only get spam offering microsoft software in gmail, and it goes into my spam folder and I dont even notice it. Also I am pretty sure it came from me signing up to something.


Someone took my post and forked a new thread on the subject.

If I read my Gmail with a client do I have all the options I would have with Gmail, like the ability to add a star to my letter and put it in the starred folder?

I was wondering why what I thought was a post, turned into a thread :P


That was me. I felt your post was off-topic but worthy of a new thread, so I made one.

I didnt know that was possible :P

aysiu
November 3rd, 2005, 01:18 AM
No, its not faster :P You dont have to log into web mail every time, thats what cookies are for. Evolution took forever to load for me. Opera takes a couple seconds, I type in gmail.com and it takes me there and I see my messages. If I am using my computer the only time I would ever not use a browser would be if I didnt want it to affect a torrent's downloading speed. Actually, that's still more effort, though. I just do my one keyboard shortcut for Thunderbird (Win + T), and it checks all five (or six... I've lost track!) of my email accounts. Even to type in those web addresses or open a folder in bookmarks for all those would take more effort. And don't forget you'd have to keep refreshing to get new messages. The email client will do that for you.



You wont loose it on gmail. You can have a page open, type something in, and unplug your ethernet cable, and still have the message in the text box right there. If you click send, it will give you a little message "Cannot connect to server" but you will still have your message sitting in the textbox there. You can save it in gedit or anything. Once again, an advantage an email client has--I don't have to copy and paste it over to gmail. I can just control-s, and it's saved.

majikstreet
November 3rd, 2005, 01:25 AM
To all:

Gmail has auto-saving. You don't have to copy and paste it over, aysiu.

qalimas
November 3rd, 2005, 01:27 AM
I use Opera, and in Opera, I use Opera's email client. I find it a lot better, as I ALWAYS have Opera open, it'll check for me every 5 minutes, and let me know when I get a new email. I'm more comfortable having my email and browser together, but not my email as a webpage :)

xequence
November 3rd, 2005, 01:29 AM
Actually, that's still more effort, though. I just do my one keyboard shortcut for Thunderbird (Win + T), and it checks all five (or six... I've lost track!) of my email accounts. Even to type in those web addresses or open a folder in bookmarks for all those would take more effort. And don't forget you'd have to keep refreshing to get new messages. The email client will do that for you.

I am pretty sure gmail auto refreshes, just like evolution and (probably) thunderbird. I dont know about keyboard shortcuts, but couldent you just make one to have opera open gmail.com? Just like "gedit /etc/apt/sources.list" (Just the file that came to mind) in the terminal would make gedit edit that file.

Anyway, its like windows and linux. Its all preference.


To all:

Gmail has auto-saving. You don't have to copy and paste it over, aysiu.
Yea =P


Once again, an advantage an email client has--I don't have to copy and paste it over to gmail. I can just control-s, and it's saved.

If I use opera and I close a window it will save the state of the window. Perfect to open up alot of pages then view them offline later.

majikstreet
November 3rd, 2005, 01:37 AM
I am 100% sure that gmail has auto-refreshing.

aysiu
November 3rd, 2005, 01:41 AM
First of all, auto-saving doesn't work if you don't have an internet connection--that was kind of the original point... what happens if you lose your internet connection?

Secondly, I don't have Gmail. If people who have only one email account and it's Gmail want to use Gmail on the web, they have a right to. The original post that I made into a thread (because it was off-topic in another thread) seem to have absolutely no understanding for a situation in which one might prefer to use an email client.

I'm explaining the advantages of an email client. Those advantages don't apply to everyone in every situation.

majikstreet
November 3rd, 2005, 01:45 AM
First of all, auto-saving doesn't work if you don't have an internet connection--that was kind of the original point... what happens if you lose your internet connection?

Secondly, I don't have Gmail. If people who have only one email account and it's Gmail want to use Gmail on the web, they have a right to. The original post that I made into a thread (because it was off-topic in another thread) seem to have absolutely no understanding for a situation in which one might prefer to use an email client.

I'm explaining the advantages of an email client. Those advantages don't apply to everyone in every situation.
Ahhh...

grsing
November 3rd, 2005, 04:29 AM
When you have too many email accounts (4 for me, all of which I get different types of email at regularly), it's easier to have just one client than a bunch of different web pages you have to keep refreshing (well, gmail refreshes itself, but the school ones have to be done manually).

fuscia
November 3rd, 2005, 05:18 AM
gmail has always struck me as a yahoo with snottier spam.

Wide
November 3rd, 2005, 05:27 AM
Gmail is not accepted as a "real" email address from some of the companies I work with.

Also all hotmail, yahoo, gmail accounts are not always accepted in a business environment.

Getting several hundred emails a day to & from various domains can only be done with any organization from a client.


Now if I only had to recieve mail from a few folks, may be a different deal but I doubt it, what if I need something & no internet connection not to mention privicy issues;)

benplaut
November 3rd, 2005, 05:47 AM
that gmailto: extension is cool :)

i would use gmail pop (used hotmail pop way back on 2mb storage), but none of the clients integrate well enough with gmail for my liking...

plus, the gmail interface is just awesome :)

panickedthumb
November 3rd, 2005, 05:58 AM
privacy issues are a non issue. With the massive amounts of backups, etc, whether you send an email through a client over pop3 or over webmail, some company probably has that email on some media for 10 years (source: a computer science professor in college, but he did have articles to back him up). So you're no more private either way.

But webmail has always been counter-intuitive to me somehow. Seeing email as a file on my computer (or close to it) rather than a page on the net just makes more sense. And even with Gmail's awesome interface, I still don't feel like I have as much control.

blastus
November 3rd, 2005, 07:01 AM
But webmail has always been counter-intuitive to me somehow. Seeing email as a file on my computer (or close to it) rather than a page on the net just makes more sense.

This is the way I feel too. I prefer to work offline as much as possible, so I am naturally inclined to use a standalone application versus a web application. IMO, the less data that is sent from my computer to my ISP over the Internet (and vice-versa) the better. Everything I do online is tracked and logged by someone. I just feel like I have a little more privacy if I take a minimalist approach to using the Internet.

I know that email is not secure, anybody can intercept it and read it, but a standalone email application sends and receives less data over the Internet than a web application. Also, the fact that I have a dialup connection, means everything I do online is slow anyway.

majikstreet
November 3rd, 2005, 10:02 PM
I'm trying to just use Evolution right now- I uninstalled the gmail notifier from firefox (which I don't really need anyway) and will remove checkgmail from my startup file for fluxbox.

Brunellus
November 3rd, 2005, 10:31 PM
if you just need a simple e-mail client for X--just to see how it suits you--I recommend sylpheed. small, light, swift, and simple.

Stormy Eyes
November 3rd, 2005, 10:54 PM
What's the big deal over these email programs like Evolution and Outlook? Why don't people just go to the site their email is hosted on (Gmail.google.com) and check it there?

I don't have GMail (and don't want it, thanks); I have my own domain. On that domain, I have a private email address, a public one that I put on my website in case somebody needs to reach me (aside from spammers, I mean), and accounts for each of the online stores with which I do business on a regular basis (like Amazon, Frederick's of Hollywood, etc.). Rather than use webmail, it's easier for me to fire up Sylpheed-Claws and have it suck down the mail from each of my accounts and sort it for me.

claydoh
November 4th, 2005, 01:42 AM
I don't have GMail (and don't want it, thanks)
I though I was the only one who didn't want/use gmail :cool:.

Now if I can find someone else who has not and probably will not see the movie Titianic.......

Buffalo Soldier
November 4th, 2005, 01:57 AM
What's the big deal over these email programs like Evolution and Outlook? Why don't people just go to the site their email is hosted on (Gmail.google.com) and check it there?Because before webmail (my first hotmail account was in 1996) using email clients/programs in how I access my first email address (given by my ISP).

Optimal Aurora
November 4th, 2005, 02:16 AM
Hay everybody, just say this,"Its easier for the average person to use." That's a fact because a lot of people out there don't understand how to keep up with there passwords and they rely on an email client, namely Outlook Express and for the tech savy Thunderbird to save their email passwords. Other than that that is about it.

Stormy Eyes
November 4th, 2005, 03:04 AM
Now if I can find someone else who has not and probably will not see the movie Titianic.......

Don't look at me. I let a girl drag me to see that tripe once. She was a silly English girl who thought Iron Maiden was 'too dramatic' but cried when DiCaprio's character went to Davy Jones' Locker.

ThirdWorld
November 4th, 2005, 05:04 AM
I used to hate email clients in the windows-outlook old days....Now with opensource options like thunderbird and evolution I love them even on windows...

panickedthumb
November 4th, 2005, 05:24 AM
Don't look at me. I let a girl drag me to see that tripe once. She was a silly English girl who thought Iron Maiden was 'too dramatic' but cried when DiCaprio's character went to Davy Jones' Locker.
this is one of the best quotes I've ever seen on the boards, and I actually kinda liked Titanic. I've grown sick of it over the years, too many acolades for not enough bang.

mconway0003
March 2nd, 2007, 05:54 AM
I use Thunderbird for several reasons:

1. I have a lot of different email accounts, and I don't want to have five or six tabs open in Firefox to keep track of them, with pages refreshing (using a lot of bandwidth) every few minutes. I'd rather have them all in one place, so I can see them. A nice little notifier in my system tray tells me if any of them have new messages.

2. I can also easily choose to reply to an email in one account using a "from" address from another account, which I sometimes do, for my own reasons. Can't do that with webmail.

3. I like having a separate web browsing and email experience. When I close Firefox, I'm done with my web browsing. I still want my email to keep going, though. Sure, I could have two Firefox windows up, but then I'd have to keep track of which one was the email one and which one was the web browsing one.

4. Not all of us have/use Gmail. Other webmail hosts (my workplace's, for example) are extremely slow when checked through a web browser but much faster (even IMAP) when checked with an email client.

5. Thunderbird beta's newest feature--the ability to detach or delete attachments from an email while still keeping the email. I don't know if Gmail can do this, but none of my other webmail accounts can without Thunderbird.

6. An easy way to deal with junk-mail messages. You press J, and they're marked as junk and deleted with that one key stroke.

7. If you're in the middle of composing a message (even using IMAP and not POP), you won't lose your message just because your internet connection goes.

Is that enough reasons for you?

Yes actually, I am installing thunder bird as we speak. But does thunderbird have your inbox as the first page you see when you sign on the thunder bird like gmail does?

Bezmotivnik
March 2nd, 2007, 06:27 AM
Is that enough reasons for you?

If it's not, here are some more:

1: Better editing capabilities (though Thunderbird's editor is very buggy)

2: Relatively transparent and OS-interoperable GnuPG w/Enigmail (MS & Linux GPG/PGP normally have compatiability problems due to EOL differences)

3: Many people detest and deeply mistrust Google ("Let's Be Evil") and do not wish to store private information on Google's servers nor let Google store their spyware on theirs.

Webmail is for gristleheads. I keep a lot of disposable webmail accounts, but for actual communicating, I use a real mail client.

Thrashers7989
March 2nd, 2007, 06:56 AM
I've been using Outlook ever since Yahoo! Mail wasn't ad-ridden and offered free POP service. My first email address was with Yahoo. This was in 1998.

I'm going to repeat the answers commonly said here. You have a local, offline copy of your mail. You have quick access to email (no logging in every time). Better security, more power for spam blockers.

My current email address is run on my domain at www.surrendered.org. Since it's a virtual dedserver, sometimes the http will be down, but the pop will be up and running. This means email access would be impossible through my web browser. Plus, personally, my server email likes to be redundant. It will ask for a password, and ask for a password again. Then you have to wait for the html to load before you can start seeing your messages.

Offline access is a great thing. Suppose you're composing an email and suddenly your Internet service is inadvertently, and NOT to your attention, interrupted. In a web browser, not knowing you were disconnected, you press send, the web browser will open an error page, you hit the back button, and your email is gone. That's the beauty of an offline client. It still goes into an outbox and will automatically send when your Internet service resumes.

If you use Evolution, you're in real luck. Having your email and a daily planner on hand, especially if you have a mobile PC/laptop, is really handy.

Basically, the biggest reason to use an offline client is that the offline world is magical. Offline never fails. You might not be able to send or receive new email, but you at least have a local copy of what is important to you. With checking your email in a web browser, you have zero, absolutely no offline advantages, and in the right (or wrong) situation, that could even be dangerous if you care about the reliability of your email client.

tubasoldier
March 2nd, 2007, 07:11 AM
In thunderbird???!

I wish I could minimize it to the tray...

That's what alltray is for I guess...

I have never used it but I hear a program called kdocker will do that for you. From the name I assume it was written in KDE but it is supposed to be able to support Gnome as well.

SunnyRabbiera
March 2nd, 2007, 07:27 AM
I use a client as sometimes my web mail doesnt work as well, plus I have found mail clients more efficiant when dealing with spam.
Evolution is a prefect example of this, I can have a generic spam folder, filter out crap content and organize things how I want them.
I can say the same with kmail

karellen
March 2nd, 2007, 09:15 AM
I use evolution, I like the fact that includes a calendar, tasks, memos and so on. plus the spam filter it's very strong. it's faster checking incoming mail this way, it's easier to switch between messages, deleting them, editing them and so on

Bezmotivnik
March 2nd, 2007, 09:19 AM
I've been using Outlook ever since Yahoo! Mail wasn't ad-ridden and offered free POP service.
Which to me seems utterly worthless without free SMTP.


Offline access is a great thing...Basically, the biggest reason to use an offline client is that the offline world is magical. Offline never fails. You might not be able to send or receive new email, but you at least have a local copy of what is important to you.

Offline certainly has failed me many times in the twenty-four (24) years I've been sending daily mail on the Internet and has eaten plenty of mail forever in power outages, system crashes, storage failures, etc., etc...though it's much rarer in recent years.

What bothers me is that there are so few decent mail clients that actually work properly. Thunderbird, Opera, Sylpheed, etc. etc. all have (at the very least) annoyingly buggy editors and nobody takes these problems seriously...believe me, I've asked. Because people don't write communications seriously and expect that somewhere along the line their e-mail is going to have its formatting mangled anyway, the developers totally blow it all off. Geeks are non-literate and don't understand the needs of those who aren't.

The only serious mail client suitable for professional use seems to still be Microsoft Outlook with Microsoft Word as the linked editor.

MrHorus
March 2nd, 2007, 09:24 AM
What's the big deal over these email programs like Evolution and Outlook? Why don't people just go to the site their email is hosted on (Gmail.google.com) and check it there?

Because I run my own mailserver and don't have a web interface for it.

That plus I don't trust anyone else to keep my mail safe - i'm just a number to them.

Oki
March 2nd, 2007, 10:15 AM
Here are the reasons for me to use client;

1. It gives you one address book to maintain, witch can get exported.
2. It gives you backup. Two times I have read that Google has lost thousands of email without any backup – witch must be a bitch for the users.
3. You can handle several mail accounts easy, I have 4.
4. You have a powerful search engine for all your mail accounts – with thousands of mails that is very important.
5. If you are a non English speaker like me, you can have spell check for your language.
6. You have a very good spam filter for all your mails.
7. It gives you one interface to work with, some webmails sucks in that area.
8. It automatically check for new mail for you.
9. I store my passwords in Xkeepass. With mail client I don’t need to remember them all, and can have stronger passwords.

Blastus: you should check out inbox.com, its better then gmail and don’t scan your mails for adds. If you look at the free offer, you can see they beat gmail on every thing.

Bezmotivnik: “and do not wish to store private information on Google's servers”; just to let you know; Google has said public that they don’t delete your mail even if you delete it – they will have it on there server has long as they want. I too “mistrust Google”.

Thrashers7989
March 3rd, 2007, 07:40 AM
Offline certainly has failed me many times in the twenty-four (24) years I've been sending daily mail on the Internet and has eaten plenty of mail forever in power outages, system crashes, storage failures, etc., etc...though it's much rarer in recent years.


Had you have been ONline or using a web client, would your situation have been any better? I don't think it's the offline client's fault that power outages, crashes, and storage failures happen, and I don't think a web client could have prevented such circumstances.

fuscia
March 3rd, 2007, 09:02 AM
it's a good excuse to play with more software.

Kateikyoushi
March 3rd, 2007, 09:10 AM
Which to me seems utterly worthless without free SMTP.

I am using yahoo and their free pop and smtp server for years...

Somenoob
March 3rd, 2007, 09:21 AM
so far, no one has mentioned that some e-mail services don't have web browser access.

SurR3AL
March 3rd, 2007, 09:29 AM
yep having a local copy is goood.....but for me, the main thing is, i'm much more comfortable working just with the OS interface than the Web 2.0 interface....hence outlook n thunderbird :)

Bezmotivnik
March 3rd, 2007, 09:38 AM
Had you have been ONline or using a web client, would your situation have been any better? I don't think it's the offline client's fault that power outages, crashes, and storage failures happen, and I don't think a web client could have prevented such circumstances.
I'm just explaining that neither are 100% safe.

Bezmotivnik
March 3rd, 2007, 09:46 AM
I am using yahoo and their free pop and smtp server for years...
On the Thunderbird forum, the moderators insisted that Yahoo absolutely doesn't have free SMTP. Wrong?

I haven't seen it, certainly...only when I had paid Yahoo DSL...and I've looked.

MOST webmail providers that provide free POP mail don't have the corresponding SMTP. Those few that do usually don't have it on alternative ports to circumvent the blocking by almost all ISPs these days.

The only one I've found so far is Bluebottle.

Kateikyoushi
March 3rd, 2007, 11:59 AM
From the yahoo.jp website, it is not on by default but just a few clicks to turn it on.


受信メール(POP3サーバー) pop.mail.yahoo.co.jp
送信メール(SMTP)サーバー smtp.mail.yahoo.co.jp

Bezmotivnik
March 3rd, 2007, 05:30 PM
From the yahoo.jp website...

Ah, Yahoo Japan -- that explains it. Not happening here. :( From the Yahoo mail help page today:

"If you have not purchased the Yahoo! Mail Plus service, you will be unable to retrieve messages via an email client. To determine whether or not you have purchased this service, please visit the My Services page."

aysiu
March 3rd, 2007, 06:42 PM
Yes actually, I am installing thunder bird as we speak. But does thunderbird have your inbox as the first page you see when you sign on the thunder bird like gmail does? It can. It doesn't by default, but I always change the default anyway. So, yes, when I log in to Thunderbird, it goes straight to my inbox and remembers the last message I was looking at.


so far, no one has mentioned that some e-mail services don't have web browser access. Maybe because some of us don't see the point. I use my web browser for browsing and my email client for emailing.

billdotson
March 3rd, 2007, 06:59 PM
I don't know. I used to check my email at the bellsouth site but I was just like hey I have firefox I will jsut get Thunderbird as well. Although I cannot seem to get gmail or hotmail working with Thunderbird in Ubuntu, so I usually have to go to Windows to check my emails (I wouldn't DARE check it through the web browser. haha.. sometimes I do though)

Some people that get alot of them would like to have them in a separate program than have another tab open in a web browser. I have seen people that have hundreds of unread email messages and it is simply easier for them to do it in such a client. Myself as I only get about 50 emails a week (most of which are people that won't quit sending me crap) so I really just use such a client because I can. Although when I had it set up in Ubuntu I forgot to tell it to leave a copy of the messages on the server so now I have to switch between Ubuntu and Windows to get to certain emails. By the way how do you copy your emails from the thunderbird application data folder onto a removable media so you can see those emails on another computer or OS?

picpak
March 3rd, 2007, 07:04 PM
I have http://izymail.com/ set up to check my two Hotmail accounts through Opera. I also have a Gmail account set up too. It's great, it checks my mail automatically and doesn't need any extra programs running; it's already in Opera.

Its biggest layback though, is its poor editor...