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ryaxnb
July 8th, 2008, 12:25 AM
Linux just has no good web browser for old machines. :(

Someone really needs to work on upgrading Links-hacked or Dillo, it's needed badly.
Any suggestions? I guess Opera? What's the min. RAM for Opera, on say DeLi?

Firefox is probably the best web browser for new machines, I haven't found a reason to switch to Opera yet!
Anyone want to give me one? I use 3.0 as the basis for my comparison, and if a stable extension also provides it, then Opera still loses.

Does anyone find Mozilla's free software policy to be slightly troubling? Seem to focused on Windows and stuff nowadays! Remember, MPL! :D

I love links-hacked. We need redevolpment of it.
And what do people like Kazehaksase?
Bring on the flame wars! :popcorn:
Move to recurring please.n

Mateo
July 8th, 2008, 12:27 AM
I agree that there really isn't a good browser for old machines. Dillo is meant for REALLY old machines. There isn't a good one for just plain old.

s3a
July 8th, 2008, 12:29 AM
Yes, use IceCat 3 instead and support it by going to the idea in my signature. :)

And dillo uses very little system requirements but is nothing of a web browsing "titan" if you know what I mean.

init1
July 8th, 2008, 12:37 AM
HV3 looks like it might be suitable for old computers.
http://tkhtml.tcl.tk/hv3.html

cardinals_fan
July 8th, 2008, 02:10 AM
Opera is awesome, but it's not light enough for really old boxes.

zmjjmz
July 8th, 2008, 05:38 AM
Skipstone is good, if you can get it to compile.
It's probably be even better with the latest webkit, like Midori, which I'm going to go compile right now (though for a not so old system).

LaRoza
July 8th, 2008, 06:05 AM
Someone really needs to work on upgrading Links-hacked or Dillo, it's needed badly.
Any suggestions? I guess Opera? What's the min. RAM for Opera, on say DeLi?

Opera works on surprisingly low specs. I don't know its minimum though.

zmjjmz
July 8th, 2008, 06:07 AM
There's a guide for setting up Opera 8 on BasicLinux (which uses kernel 2.2).
It should work nicely with 32MB RAM or higher and a 133Mhz Pentium or higher.

p_quarles
July 8th, 2008, 06:09 AM
Opera works on surprisingly low specs. I don't know its minimum though.
It runs on my ancient cell phone (Opera Mini, of course). So, it runs, for all intents and purposes, on a toaster.

dominiquec
July 8th, 2008, 06:11 AM
Tried Seamonkey or Epiphany?

chris4585
July 8th, 2008, 07:41 AM
links2 with -g option = pure awesomeness? no flash support though

zmjjmz
July 8th, 2008, 07:43 AM
Using Midori with WebKit r32268 right now, it's both insanely fast and it gets 99/100 on the Acid3 (and I must be doing something wrong).
Later versions of WebKit support flash, so it'd be a great thing to do.

Tikkun olam
July 8th, 2008, 08:54 AM
Kazehakase (http://www.google.com/url?sa=U&start=1&q=http://kazehakase.sourceforge.jp/&usg=AFQjCNHnB2p2Q6J9AcUmXw7W5uSaGyzA9A) installed by default on Fluxbuntu (http://wiki.fluxbuntu.org/index.php?title=Explore#What_Applications_are_Inst alled_by_Default.3F), give it a whirl.

joninkrakow
July 8th, 2008, 10:41 AM
Linux just has no good web browser for old machines. :(

Firefox is probably the best web browser for new machines, I haven't found a reason to switch to Opera yet!
Anyone want to give me one? I use 3.0 as the basis for my comparison, and if a stable extension also provides it, then Opera still loses.


Could you define "old machine"? On my Dell 366hz PII, (160Mb RAM), I'm running Firefox 3 with ABP, Noscript and Tree-Style Tab plugins, and it runs super. Granted YouTube videos are nearly unusable, but that's not Firefox's problem. :-)

I think my computer counts as "low-end" so I think FF3 is quite usable as a solution. BTW, I wouldn't try FF2 on this computer. SeaMonkey worked great with PuppyLinux, but I've since added FF3 to Puppy as well as to my Xubuntu install.

One caveat, I run LXDE and icewm, which helps with the speed issues.

-Jon

Polygon
July 8th, 2008, 11:28 AM
Kazehakase (http://www.google.com/url?sa=U&start=1&q=http://kazehakase.sourceforge.jp/&usg=AFQjCNHnB2p2Q6J9AcUmXw7W5uSaGyzA9A) installed by default on Fluxbuntu (http://wiki.fluxbuntu.org/index.php?title=Explore#What_Applications_are_Inst alled_by_Default.3F), give it a whirl.

i second that, kazehakase (which can be installed via the repos) is a great low spec browser.

zmjjmz
July 8th, 2008, 01:33 PM
I know Midori doesn't have ABP or such, but just copypastaing commands from the guide here (http://blog.kagou.fr/post/2008/04/21/Midori-browser-under-Ubuntu-Hardy-and-last-Webkit) worked pretty nicely, albeit compiling took a bit of time.
EDIT: You really can't expect much in a lightweight browser. On the Kazehakase wiki, there is a way to block ads, but I'm pretty sure the same can't (yet) be applied to Midori.