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tyraeon
July 5th, 2008, 09:37 PM
How many members here are not involved in an IT-related career? I only ask because I've always felt that one who is not working in a specific field is an unreliable resource in said field. However, I am a music teacher by trade, and I'm still the only one my friends turn to with Linux / computer questions. I also consider myself a programmer, coder, leet h4xx0r, regardless of the fact that I did not go to college for Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or any related field.

My question is, how many people out there are like me? Don't work with computers or code for a living, yet spend most of their leisure time looking as if they are someone who does? I'm really interested to find out.

zmjjmz
July 5th, 2008, 09:40 PM
I can't work in computers for a living, too young.
I still know a lot though.

Dr Small
July 5th, 2008, 09:41 PM
Well, I don't work yet, so I guess I can't be considered working IT. But, I live on a farm, repair computers, assist my neighbors, help people online and do some coding on the side along with running a server. :D

tyraeon
July 5th, 2008, 09:45 PM
Well then, do you plan on working with them?

zmjjmz
July 5th, 2008, 09:46 PM
I do.

Barrucadu
July 5th, 2008, 09:49 PM
I'm still at school but plan on working in IT and doing computer science in university; I'm also trying to get some work experience in the IT department of my city council.

LaRoza
July 5th, 2008, 09:50 PM
I only ask because I've always felt that one who is not working in a specific field is an unreliable resource in said field.

In general, they would be, but people are individuals and knowledge isn't restricted to a select few. There are some CS majors I wouldn't trust to touch my computer case.

I am not involved in IT work or education.

chucky chuckaluck
July 5th, 2008, 09:53 PM
i shouldn't even be allowed near a computer.

era86
July 5th, 2008, 10:13 PM
I used to work in a warehouse picking mattresses. Best job I ever had!

ajgreeny
July 5th, 2008, 10:15 PM
Well, I'm a retired horticulturist with no IT interests other than wanting to try something other than Windows. Been with ubuntu for about 3 years and only boot to windows to use my old parallel scanner that will not work with sane. I may not be an expert, but I wouldn't go back to MS now and will certainly never use it as my main OS again.

dizee
July 5th, 2008, 10:46 PM
i'm no hacker. i'm not particularly interested in IT. i just like linux better (and it's more fun) but i don't think i'll end up in the IT industry, certainly not if the degree i'm doing is anything to go by.

Pethegreat
July 5th, 2008, 10:54 PM
I am not in the IT industry. My current job has me in a warehouse doing odd jobs. I am going to college for engineering. While I am there I am going to look into a job working at one of the school's computer labs. I would just do simple stuff like get rid viruses and spyware. It pays minium wage, but it is better than nothing.

At home I am the computer master. I take care of my own 2 computers, and the family computer.

smartboyathome
July 5th, 2008, 10:55 PM
I am still a student, too young to work, so I am not an IT. Though I may become one when I can work.

gn2
July 5th, 2008, 11:06 PM
I do not work with IT.

Instead I work in railway signalboxes which have signal lever frames, some of which are well over 100 years old and made out of cast iron.

For example here's the one where I'm working on Monday and Tuesday next week: http://www.signalbox.org/gallery/sc/inverurie.htm

Old_Grey_Wolf
July 5th, 2008, 11:09 PM
Well, about 40 years ago I graduated with a degree in electronics engineering. Since then I have changed careers by switching to software development and systems engineering. I have progressed through the food chain, and at the moment I am in management. Not a VP yet though. :)

Playing with Linux at home has been invaluable. I can see through some of the people trying to "blow purple smoke up my a***". I know about new technology, I know about new ways of doing development, I think about how my company can employ agile or incremental development and test methods. I've looked at Ubuntu's 6 month release cycle, and the way they employ users to test their software using pre-defined scenarios on a daily or monthly cycle. In the old waterfall philosophy I've seen software development that took a year with no testing. When the software was turned over to test -- it wouldn't even compile. I'm trying to get my company to incorporate not only the technology of open source; but, also the development and test philosophy that obviously works.

Thanks Ubuntu. I could hire consultants to present Agile, Extreme Programming, Scrum, etc. However, seeing it in action and having the opportunity to participate in the process is invaluable.

isaacj87
July 5th, 2008, 11:09 PM
i shouldn't even be allowed near a computer.

Lol...I saw that and started laughing. Good stuff...

I really like computers, but have no interest in making a career out of them. I'm currently a nursing major trying to get my BSN!

oldsoundguy
July 5th, 2008, 11:15 PM
No IT here, but I do some on line computer consulting and some home based repairs for friends as I am a retired Audio Engineer.

99.9% of the consultation is based on something that has gone south in Windows .. either with a hardware issue (about 30%) or software crash due to the inability of a lot of people to keep their Windows system adequately protected from attack or something in the OS itself has gone bye bye!

Why I prefer Linux .. set it up and not to worry .. no wasted time doing protection updates and hours worth of scanning each month!

J.T.
July 5th, 2008, 11:28 PM
I am currently a construction electrician, but I am going to school for computer network systems, so I will be I.T., just not yet.

Mazza558
July 5th, 2008, 11:37 PM
The closest I came to I.T out of choice was work experience, doing web design. I HATED it. It was incredibly boring and put me off working in I.T in the future.

That experience reinforced the fact that I.T is dead to me. Part of the reason why Linux appeals to me is that it makes computing come alive, even human - exciting and a hobby. I've been skilled with computers for a while now but I'm determined not to end up in that kind of job for life - computers as a hobby AND as work seems over-the-top.

On the one hand, I feel stupid for not exploiting my talents for employment, but it's the equivalent of being an accountant and then reading a book about accountants whilst discussing accountancy with forum members from accountancy forums during my free time. Bah.

Superkoop
July 5th, 2008, 11:57 PM
Nope, not an IT. It interests me as a hobby, but for a real working career I have larger fish to catch. ;)

aysiu
July 6th, 2008, 06:14 AM
I don't work in IT, never have.

Have always worked in schools. I started off as an English teacher. Now I work in admissions.

Midwest-Linux
July 6th, 2008, 06:22 AM
I don't work in IT or any computer related field. I am studying for the CompTia+ however and looking to make a career change.

venator260
July 6th, 2008, 05:19 PM
No IT here, and no interest in changing that. I have a year of schooling left until I have a BSED in History/Social Studies Education.

Ioky
July 6th, 2008, 05:28 PM
Well, I am a photographer/Artist. And I use Linux everyday. Computer is just something I like to play with. You don't really need to stay in one corners of the world while the whole world is available for you. Just don't like yourselves limited because of others.

Sealbhach
July 6th, 2008, 05:31 PM
No IT history on my CV er, resume.

No IT training.


I work as a contracts administrator for a homelessness charity.


.

lazertek
July 6th, 2008, 05:55 PM
CS Major and most probably going to end up in an IT field that's only if i don't make millions on forex by the time I graduate from college:)

wanna leave a little note: give virtualization a try... running windows on ubuntu will just make things so much easier... wish i could do everything on linux but its going to be a while before things get standarized... as a matter of fact soon as parallel processing comes in play on every pc things are about to get even more complex...

odiseo77
July 6th, 2008, 06:17 PM
I studied literature at the university and currently work in a library, so, my profession is like the opposite to any IT area. However, what I know about Linux and computers generally serves well to my purposes and needs (although, I would like to learn other things like programming, and get to know Linux even deeper). Sometimes I fix my friends' and family PC's more for hobby and interest than for work.

Greetings :)

lukjad
July 6th, 2008, 07:03 PM
I have just finished high school. I am now waiting for a Trade course in computers the will begin in late August/Early September. So, I am not really working as a technician but my classmates, teachers, neighbours and my mom are all helped by me. Does that count?

Shobuz99
July 6th, 2008, 07:05 PM
I'm not a schooled/degree IT member; however I spent 28 years working for IBM. I started working there in 1974 as
an entry level equipment operator. I had no background in
computers; mostly high school electronics courses and machine shop experience. By 1984,
I had learned how to operate and program IBM's new 1980 mainframe system; for use with terminal applications used in a mfg. environment.
Within 3 years, I was on my way to buying my own IBM 8088 PC (6 mhz chip, 30MB hard drive, and 128kb of memory) and
I began my addiction to making that stupid thing do things
that I wanted it to. It was a long learning process, because I have an aversion to math..:oops:
Today I've become a computer tech/webmaster..of sorts.
Still trying to improve my skills; but fully aware that my age; 58,
is hampering my learning and concentration abilities.

I was terminated from the company that IBM sold their Endicott, NY 'birthplace' facility, in 2002.
I've been trying to find an IT job ever since. It's hard when you know that your skills are not up-to-date
and you know that you can't afford $$$$ to go back to school and earn an IT degree.
My other vocation is a lead singer for a band that had a hit record in 1968 (Nobody But Me); The Human Beinz (http://www.thehumanbeinz.com).
I've been singing R&B and Rock-n-Roll since 1964 at age 15 (I'll be 59 in November).
So.. I guess I'm not qualified to be called an IT member.. just a "used-to-wanna-be".
Rick Shobuz99

rudihawk
July 6th, 2008, 07:08 PM
Studying Civil Engineering next year...

blazercist
July 6th, 2008, 07:28 PM
bus mgmt/finance and im in law school, no formal IT training/career. but have always been very interested in computers

forger
July 6th, 2008, 07:32 PM
Medical student here, second year, a great fan of IT and a really active hobbyist :)

the8thstar
July 6th, 2008, 07:34 PM
As of now, I'm a radiologic technologist. I'm by no means an IT specialist, although I rely heavily on high-end electronic equipment with advanced software from GE, Philips and Siemens in the hospital settings. There seems to be a happy mix of Windows, Linux with proprietary code and some Solaris too, bound together through Citrix and some other fun stuff. Urgh.

walkerk
July 6th, 2008, 07:41 PM
I have many friends that use Linux outside of the IT career field. Some of which use it after I introduced it to them...

I do work in the IT career field though. Networking and Systems.... Cisco, Foundry, ATM, MS, and Unix.... Certs all but Unix... I have the Linux+ though :/

nothingspecial
July 6th, 2008, 07:50 PM
I didn`t want to go near a computer till I saw an iPod and a squeezebox. Then I just had to have them. Music`s my interest.
However once I got my head round it I`ve never looked back. I was given a Ubuntu PC by a friend (gave him some cash). Never had windows at home by the way (apart from about a week when I bought a new laptop, dual booted and then thought I don`t want to learn a new OS and installed Ubuntu over the whole thing)
My job has absolutely nothing to do with IT.