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View Full Version : Do you plan on buying a kindle?



MONODA
June 17th, 2008, 05:24 PM
Do you plan on buying a amazon kindle reading device? link (http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-Amazons-Wireless-Reading-Device/dp/B000FI73MA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1213719669&sr=8-1) I must say, it looks like this could be the start of something great, but I will hold off untill the new paper screen is farther in development and the price goes down.

LaRoza
June 17th, 2008, 05:29 PM
No. If I want to read something, I get a book. If I want to read something in an electronic format, I use a computer.

MONODA
June 17th, 2008, 05:34 PM
there are also other good things about it, have you read the page I linked?

Exsecrabilus
June 17th, 2008, 05:40 PM
I'm all about design, and it doesn't look that good to me.

LaRoza
June 17th, 2008, 05:44 PM
there are also other good things about it, have you read the page I linked?

I already investigated it. It is a neat devise, and probably going to be the start of a new form of media (but not a replacement), but I don't see a need for it (for me)

zmjjmz
June 17th, 2008, 06:35 PM
If it can't read PDF's, fuggedaboutit.
My mom has one, and while it's nice to read and all, the amount of DRM and lock in makes me sick.

MONODA
June 17th, 2008, 06:57 PM
If it can't read PDF's, fuggedaboutit.
My mom has one, and while it's nice to read and all, the amount of DRM and lock in makes me sick.
I see what you mean, I despise DRM. Of course, it is no way worth $400 (which is the price) since reading a book is almost the same thing. the one thing that I got me interested is that since it is light, it is easier to read while in bed than a book since large books can get frustrating to deal with while laying down. It would be nice to have something similar built into portable devices in the future.

LaRoza
June 17th, 2008, 07:06 PM
I see what you mean, I despise DRM. Of course, it is no way worth $400 (which is the price) since reading a book is almost the same thing. the one thing that I got me interested is that since it is light, it is easier to read while in bed than a book since large books can get frustrating to deal with while laying down. It would be nice to have something similar built into portable devices in the future.

Don't you see the irony? A book is the perfect format. No DRM, user friendly, easy navigation (if they have an index or TOC), and are commonly used.

fatality_uk
June 17th, 2008, 07:14 PM
I did like the quote

"This is the future of book reading. It will be everywhere."
Pretty amazing claim :lol:

The technology is nothing new. It's a variety of hardware, packaged up in a nice DRM box. I wont be a customer.

MONODA
June 17th, 2008, 07:15 PM
Don't you see the irony? A book is the perfect format. No DRM, user friendly, easy navigation (if they have an index or TOC), and are commonly used.
that depends what you mean by user friendly. I would find it much easier to just scroll down than turn a page (i just realized how lazy I have become lol). BTW I am talking about reading a novel, not a refrence book or book used for learning things, usually you dont nead a table of contents in a novel.

Mr. Picklesworth
June 17th, 2008, 07:18 PM
I would want a portable device running modern text-based Linux with a touch sensitive 24-colour e-ink display and wifi. It would be pure beauty :)
No need for a GUI, or much fancy processing power. Just a terminal and a huge battery life.

So, I would buy something similar to the Kindle, but it will probably be a while before such a thing comes to be...

MONODA
June 17th, 2008, 07:26 PM
I would want a portable device running modern text-based Linux with a touch sensitive e-ink display and wifi. It would be pure beauty
that would be nice :D but I have never seen the purpose of touch displays, you can do the same thing cheaper with a scroll wheel on the side with a normal e-ink display.

kernelhaxor
June 17th, 2008, 07:28 PM
Sure I'd like to have one but the price is the only thing thts keeping me away from it ..
Another surprising thing is tht books cost almost the same, hardcopy or the electronic copy delivered to kindle .. what happened to the printing and paper cost ..

Mateo
June 17th, 2008, 07:32 PM
Have one, had it since January. Was on a wait list for about a month. Definitely a very cool device. Most of the "I like books" crowd will come around. I can't imagine people still buying books 100 years for now except as collectors items. Of the many electronic devices I've bought in the past 6 months (iPhone, Blackberry Curve, Popcorn Hour, Xbox 360) Kindle is by far the coolest.

There are a couple of (minor) flaws though. The "cover" for it is kind of a piece of junk. It has a tendancy off snapping the back of the Kindle. Also, leaving the "Whispernet" on will drain the battery in a few days. Unless you have blog subscriptions or daily newspaper subscriptions, I don't see a need to keep it on (even then, I'd just turn it on when I wanted the stuff to download). If you turn off Whispernet, I've seen my Kindle hold a charge for weeks if I'm not using it frequently.

People who are waiting for color screens are going to be waiting for a while. The technology isn't there yet. It took, what, 30 years for color television? The Kindle will be obsolete by the time a color version comes out, enjoy the technology for what it is today. It'll do comics down the road.

Mateo
June 17th, 2008, 07:34 PM
Sure I'd like to have one but the price is the only thing thts keeping me away from it ..
Another surprising thing is tht books cost almost the same, hardcopy or the electronic copy delivered to kindle .. what happened to the printing and paper cost ..

Really? What bookstore are you visiting that sells $10 brand-new books of the bestsellers? Kindle prices are comparable to that of a used book store, but you actually can get new titles with the Kindle.

As for the price of the device, definitely is high for occassional readers. Frequent readers will reap the savings on the cost of books and the ease of use relatively quickly.

Mateo
June 17th, 2008, 07:38 PM
The technology is nothing new. It's a variety of hardware, packaged up in a nice DRM box. I wont be a customer.

The Kindle is not a DRM device. The books sold on Amazon.com are DRM. The device will read a variety of formats, not just DRM ones.

Ralob
June 17th, 2008, 07:51 PM
I have a CyBook, which is made by Bookeen. I love it, especially when I have some downtime on the way to school or some other downtime.

original_jamingrit
June 17th, 2008, 08:08 PM
I'd be more interested in modding a Nintendo DS. A buddy of mine is a DS fan, and he's been talking about some interesting things to do with the DS. You can install linux on memory cartridge, and it might not be too hard put something like xpdf on it as well. Plus I just love the book-like feel of the DS when you turn it on it's side.

If not a DS, then some sort of sub-notebook PC. Just buying something like Kindle that's intended for just one sort of use doesn't appeal to me.

nitrogensixteen
June 18th, 2008, 04:03 AM
Personally, the Kindle is fantastic for me. The Kindle does not require DRM. Whispernet is extremely convenient, so is free 24-hour cellular internet access.
If you don't have a need to carry an extremely large number of books in a very compact package, what use is an ebook in any form or elevated price point going to be for you? My job limits me to several cubic feet of personal space for over 2 months at a time and the kindle is a life saver, the battery life is incredible, it is ergonomic for me, and it is the most cost and space effective solution.
If you have the need for a compact e-book, check one out.

Wes Doobner
June 27th, 2008, 09:47 PM
Kindle is to books what iPods are to vinyl LPs. Of course there are no DRMs for LPs; and some people love the sound, look and feel of LPs just like some love the smell, look and feel of paper books and newspaper. Those will always be around to some degree.

But the reality is that digital books, like MP3s, are the future. The monetary and environmental cost of producing and delivering books, not to mention the potential profit margins of ebooks for publishers, coupled with the ability to update previously produced material (i.e. textbooks, encyclopedias, etc.) make the future of ebooks pretty much assured.

As for DRM, well you don't have to use Amazon's DRM books, just like you don't have to use iTunes to get music on your iPod. I'm sure that the furure landscape for ebooks/DRM will be different, just as it is for MP3.

And reading on the Kindle blows away reading on a computer or UMPC. Plus I can lay on my back in a park and read a book like War & Peace... something I can't do with the actual book, War & Peace because it's too big and heavy.

5m0k3
June 27th, 2008, 10:27 PM
There is something about simply flipping a page that I find quite satisfying.

mrgnash
June 27th, 2008, 11:17 PM
No PDF = no deal.

Woormy
June 28th, 2008, 03:57 AM
Kindle is to books what iPods are to vinyl LPs. Of course there are no DRMs for LPs; and some people love the sound, look and feel of LPs just like some love the smell, look and feel of paper books and newspaper. Those will always be around to some degree.

But the reality is that digital books, like MP3s, are the future. The monetary and environmental cost of producing and delivering books, not to mention the potential profit margins of ebooks for publishers, coupled with the ability to update previously produced material (i.e. textbooks, encyclopedias, etc.) make the future of ebooks pretty much assured.

As for DRM, well you don't have to use Amazon's DRM books, just like you don't have to use iTunes to get music on your iPod. I'm sure that the furure landscape for ebooks/DRM will be different, just as it is for MP3.

And reading on the Kindle blows away reading on a computer or UMPC. Plus I can lay on my back in a park and read a book like War & Peace... something I can't do with the actual book, War & Peace because it's too big and heavy.

I think you're completely right. This is one of those things that everyone will be using sooner or later, like it or not. Hopefully more will enter the market and all the features (or lack of) people say are preventing them from getting something like the Kindle will start appearing.

Mark, put Kindbuntu on your to-do list.

holiday
June 28th, 2008, 04:29 AM
Oh yes! Thank you for reminding me. I am going to buy a kindle.

I love the idea of having an mp3 player of things to read. And being able to search.

It's a bit pricey and the selection is not complete, but if you easily have the money then do it. It's like voting for a new device.

Eventually though it will need a cell phone and email.

On the other hand, maybe a really great thing about a book is that you're not going to get some im alert.

So that's going to be a challenge. To contain the kindle. The usual progression is an expansion of features. And then you might as well have a laptop.

DigitalDuality
June 28th, 2008, 04:33 AM
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afeasfaerw23231233
June 28th, 2008, 05:11 AM
reading book on a screen is not a good thing. i won't do that except i can't get the book. wow. that kindle is expensive!

Mateo
June 28th, 2008, 06:47 AM
reading book on a screen is not a good thing. i won't do that except i can't get the book. wow. that kindle is expensive!

reading on an eink screen is the same as reading on paper. to your eyes at least.

scouser73
June 28th, 2008, 08:23 AM
# Revolutionary electronic-paper display provides a sharp, high-resolution screen that looks and reads like real paper.
# Simple to use: no computer, no cables, no syncing.

Exactly like a paper...strange eh!

BOBSONATOR
June 28th, 2008, 08:29 AM
there Is Something About Simply Flipping A Page That I Find Quite Satisfying.


+1

aysiu
June 28th, 2008, 08:40 AM
I don't relish the idea of reading 300+ pages on a screen.

Mateo
June 28th, 2008, 03:29 PM
It's the same as reading 300+ pages on paper, except it can hold hundreds of other 300+ page books in the same small package.

aysiu
June 28th, 2008, 03:45 PM
It's the same as reading 300+ pages on paper, except it can hold hundreds of other 300+ page books in the same small package.
No, it's a strain on my eyes. Same words. Different experience.

GStubbs43
June 28th, 2008, 04:22 PM
No, it's a strain on my eyes. Same words. Different experience.

It's a different technology than a normal screen.
It looks exactly like paper, no backlight either.
It's readable in sunlight, such as normal paper would be, and at night time you can use a reading light with it.

It's kind of one of those things you need to see in person.

Mateo
June 28th, 2008, 05:01 PM
No, it's a strain on my eyes. Same words. Different experience.

Your thinking of a backlit screen. Those do strain the eyes. Eink is not backlit, there is no refresh rate. It has the same effect on the eyes as paper. None.

bobbob94
June 28th, 2008, 06:36 PM
I just can't help thinking how many real books I could buy for the price of a Kindle ;) They'd also have the advantage of never running out of power or otherwise malfunctioning when I want to read them. And having hundreds of books in one device doesn't seem that handy to me, as I only read one or two at a time anyway, and carrying one book around seems about the same as carrying a Kindle. Its not really the same as the convenience of electronic music. Sure, I might want to listen to a certain song or album on a whim, or a random selection, and I appreciate being able to have all my music with me without having to carry hundreds of Cds. However I don't ever decide randomly while I'm out for the day that I want to start reading several different novels, I read one till I've finished it and then get a new one from home or a bookshop. I suppose it might be useful for some people to have a large selection of reference texts to hand, but for me I just don't see much appeal to owning a Kindle.

Dr. C
June 30th, 2008, 04:23 AM
No

The ebook readers on the market have some great technology and the idea of having hundreds of books on one device is great, but they have one very serious flaw: They are defective by design!. I have books that are over 300 years old yet perfectly readable. Does anyone think that the DRM laden ebooks are going be readable 6 years form now let alone 300 years from now? DRM laden ebooks are the start of the technological dark ages and I am not going to contribute the the destruction of human knowledge by supporting any vendor that sells DRM laden ebook readers.

This is least we can do for future generations.

ice60
June 30th, 2008, 05:42 AM
No PDF = no deal.

doesn't it read PDFs?

i heard some people talk about it on some podcasts and saw some videos of the kindle on youtube when it came out. everyone says the big button/lever that runs down the left side means you can't hold it properly, i think the button goes back one page. so you have to hold the kindle at the top or bottom and that ruins it! someone did say they stuck a peg in it to stop the button working, but the kindle is just badly designed.

it's cool you can get your daily paper every day and browse amazon and download a book in 10 seconds. but, i don't want one.

i want something that can read my PDF and CHM books, i don't need the internet or anything wifi/bluetooth.

if you get one of these bookreaders you'll never have to buy a book again because you can download any book from the internet =P i definitely want one of these e-ink bookreaders, but they're still very new technology and too expensive. i'll get one when they're cheaper and have better features, maybe even with the internet, i changed my mind already lol.

untermensch
June 30th, 2008, 05:49 AM
Don't you get the books for cheaper as well? I like the idea of a frequent buyers card (type idea)

I think books are great, but a lot of the books I read are rather big, bulky, and heavy, especially if I'm taking them somewhere else. I like the idea of having all these big heavy books light and compact. Maybe I'm confused as to what it can do (how many books can it hold) but I like it and I will probably purchase one when the price drops a bit, (it's a little steep now)

|{urse
June 30th, 2008, 05:55 AM
Ummm.. This is not another crappy Palm Pilot, how?

ice60
June 30th, 2008, 06:16 AM
Maybe I'm confused as to what it can do (how many books can it hold) but I like it and I will probably purchase one when the price drops a bit, (it's a little steep now)

it can hold a lot of books, i can't remember the numbers right now.
someone reverse engineered his kindle and found loads of hacks for it. i just found his site i think -
http://igorsk.blogspot.com/

a great thing about it is one battery charge lasts for a few books because it only uses power when it changes pages. e-ink reminds me of an etch-a-sketch lol, the screen doesn't refresh like a computer screen has too and you can't use it in the dark.

here's another tips and hacks link -
http://www.collegedegrees.com/blog/2008/06/17/hack-your-kindle-100-tips-resources-and-tutorials-to-get-more-out-of-the-amazon-kindle/
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=kindle&search=Search

i secretly want one i think =]

red_Marvin
June 30th, 2008, 11:51 AM
No, I probably won't get one, but I'd love an eee class subnotebook with this kind of screen.

CbrPad
June 30th, 2008, 12:37 PM
I'm not interested in the Kindle, it's not for me. The IRex Iliad is far more to my liking but is waay too expensive. I'm keeping my eye on Astak Mentor at the moment but will wait for prices and a definite spec first.

http://www.mobileread.com/forums/ is an excellent resource.

Wes Doobner
July 1st, 2008, 02:52 AM
No, I probably won't get one, but I'd love an eee class subnotebook with this kind of screen.

eInk screens are a long way away from being useful as regular computer screens. #1, they are really only available as black & white right now. #2, the rendering is way too slow for video, etc. Maybe someday.

Wes Doobner
July 1st, 2008, 03:04 AM
I just can't help thinking how many real books I could buy for the price of a Kindle ;) They'd also have the advantage of never running out of power or otherwise malfunctioning when I want to read them. And having hundreds of books in one device doesn't seem that handy to me, as I only read one or two at a time anyway, and carrying one book around seems about the same as carrying a Kindle. Its not really the same as the convenience of electronic music. Sure, I might want to listen to a certain song or album on a whim, or a random selection, and I appreciate being able to have all my music with me without having to carry hundreds of Cds. However I don't ever decide randomly while I'm out for the day that I want to start reading several different novels, I read one till I've finished it and then get a new one from home or a bookshop. I suppose it might be useful for some people to have a large selection of reference texts to hand, but for me I just don't see much appeal to owning a Kindle.

Yeah, I have hundreds of books, mostly textbooks. Every time I move I am reminded of them, and reshelving them, and the boxes and boxes of ones out in my garage cry at night, I think. Either way, I probably haven't read 90% of them in years.

As far as "how many you can buy for the price of a Kindle", hmmm, right now probably 3 old-growth trees worth of paperbacks, or 2-3 college textbooks that will be outdated in 5 years. :) Of course, going forward, that number will drop due to the price of paper production doubling in the next few years. Not to mention the environmental damages done by logging and paper production.

Anyway, the point of a Kindle really isn't just the number of books you can have with you at one time - which, via SD cards, is essentially limitless. But consider the delivery of 2 or 3 daily newspapers, weekly/monthly magazines, and oh yeah, a few books as well. That's delivery of your papers no matter where you are at, by the way. Try carrying all that with you.

Just like, who needs to carry 10000 MP3 songs with them? Or 30 hours of video in a portable device? That's just CRAZY, I tells ye - noone would buy such a device! Oh, except those iPods and iPod clones are flying off the shelves...

Anyway, the Kindle really isn't designed for the portable computing set. There are better devices for that... but for what it does, it does well and is getting better. Of course there are naysayers, of course there are limitations and quirks, but really... this sounds like the argument against iPods a la 2001. Well, I don't want to oversell it, but seriously, arguing against a Kindle by pretending that it is just about how many books it can hold misses the point entirely.

Wes Doobner
July 1st, 2008, 03:09 AM
Ummm.. This is not another crappy Palm Pilot, how?

It's nothing at all like a Palm Pilot.

Mateo
July 1st, 2008, 03:51 AM
doesn't it read PDFs?

i heard some people talk about it on some podcasts and saw some videos of the kindle on youtube when it came out. everyone says the big button/lever that runs down the left side means you can't hold it properly, i think the button goes back one page. so you have to hold the kindle at the top or bottom and that ruins it! someone did say they stuck a peg in it to stop the button working, but the kindle is just badly designed.

it's cool you can get your daily paper every day and browse amazon and download a book in 10 seconds. but, i don't want one.

i want something that can read my PDF and CHM books, i don't need the internet or anything wifi/bluetooth.

if you get one of these bookreaders you'll never have to buy a book again because you can download any book from the internet =P i definitely want one of these e-ink bookreaders, but they're still very new technology and too expensive. i'll get one when they're cheaper and have better features, maybe even with the internet, i changed my mind already lol.

No, the Kindle doesn't read PDFs but some of the other readers do (Cybook is one). There are ways to convert the PDF to the native format but I think none of these are really good methods. The problem with PDFs is that they aren't necessarily OCRed and the technology kind of needs that.

Mateo
July 1st, 2008, 03:57 AM
Don't you get the books for cheaper as well? I like the idea of a frequent buyers card (type idea)

I think books are great, but a lot of the books I read are rather big, bulky, and heavy, especially if I'm taking them somewhere else. I like the idea of having all these big heavy books light and compact. Maybe I'm confused as to what it can do (how many books can it hold) but I like it and I will probably purchase one when the price drops a bit, (it's a little steep now)

Yes, they are cheaper. The typical bestseller or new release is $9.99 (vs. $15.99 - $25.99 for a book). Only reference books and textbooks are higher than $9.99.

The storage capacity is very high. You can easily store hundreds of books on the device memory alone, and there is an SD card slot that allows for even more.

Actually one of the flaws of the Kindle is that while it can hold a whole lot of books, the navigation isn't that easy. So if you hold more than a couple of dozens it becomes cumbersome to find what you want.

Mateo
July 1st, 2008, 04:00 AM
Ummm.. This is not another crappy Palm Pilot, how?

? They are completely different devices, which use different technologies and serve different purposes.

Mateo
July 1st, 2008, 04:03 AM
eInk screens are a long way away from being useful as regular computer screens. #1, they are really only available as black & white right now. #2, the rendering is way too slow for video, etc. Maybe someday.

I can't imagine there ever being an eink computer monitor. There's no reason to. They serve a different purpose from LCDs. This is like asking for a pickup truck/motorcycle hybrid.... why?

bobbob94
July 1st, 2008, 11:28 AM
Yeah, I have hundreds of books, mostly textbooks. Every time I move I am reminded of them, and reshelving them, and the boxes and boxes of ones out in my garage cry at night, I think. Either way, I probably haven't read 90% of them in years.

As far as "how many you can buy for the price of a Kindle", hmmm, right now probably 3 old-growth trees worth of paperbacks, or 2-3 college textbooks that will be outdated in 5 years. :) Of course, going forward, that number will drop due to the price of paper production doubling in the next few years. Not to mention the environmental damages done by logging and paper production.

Anyway, the point of a Kindle really isn't just the number of books you can have with you at one time - which, via SD cards, is essentially limitless. But consider the delivery of 2 or 3 daily newspapers, weekly/monthly magazines, and oh yeah, a few books as well. That's delivery of your papers no matter where you are at, by the way. Try carrying all that with you.

Just like, who needs to carry 10000 MP3 songs with them? Or 30 hours of video in a portable device? That's just CRAZY, I tells ye - noone would buy such a device! Oh, except those iPods and iPod clones are flying off the shelves...

Anyway, the Kindle really isn't designed for the portable computing set. There are better devices for that... but for what it does, it does well and is getting better. Of course there are naysayers, of course there are limitations and quirks, but really... this sounds like the argument against iPods a la 2001. Well, I don't want to oversell it, but seriously, arguing against a Kindle by pretending that it is just about how many books it can hold misses the point entirely.


well, if you have hundreds of books you never read you could always sell them, or donate them to a charity bookshop (which incidently you can't do with a DRM'd electronic book). as for the environmental cost of books, well thats a fair point but then of course you also have to consider the environmental cost of producing electronic consumer goods which people typically use for a few years then dump for the latest model...
to be honest i've never found it that much of a problem to carry a newspaper and a paperback book with me ;) my reading habits don't require that i'd ever be wandering around with 3 newspapers, a few magazines and several books. if yours do maybe something like the kindle has a place in your life, fair enough. i don't think equating them with ipods is a convincing argument though, for the reasons i already gave- being able to choose from thousands of songs while you're out and about is genuinely useful, but being able to choose from thousands of books just isn't the same thing- listening to a song takes a few minutes then you want a different one, and a few minutes later another one again. the difference is that reading a book usually takes several days, and you read a book through till you finish it. you don't normally want to randomly read short excerpts from loads of different books, as you often would with music albums. i think its an important difference...

red_Marvin
July 1st, 2008, 04:45 PM
eInk screens are a long way away from being useful as regular computer screens. #1, they are really only available as black & white right now. #2, the rendering is way too slow for video, etc. Maybe someday.
Exactly. What I want is not an n-bit colour screen that can show 1080p or whatever, but a simple machine to do simple things with, typing maybe, and something with good battery life and not needing to find a dark enough place so I can read what's on the screen. :)

|{urse
July 1st, 2008, 11:39 PM
It's nothing at all like a Palm Pilot.

... how? There are a lot more features on a Palm Pilot, Maybe I'm the only one who only used their palm for reading Ebooks. So it's like a Crappy Palm. Not the kind when you drop the TP mid-wipe lol.

CbrPad
July 2nd, 2008, 12:20 PM
If people want a laptop or a mini-notebook like an Asus EEEPC, Msi Wind or whatever, then get one of those. An EBook reader such as the Kindle is NOT a laptop replacement nor is it meant to be. It is simply an electronic book reader.

Any functions such as rss feeds, webbrowsing, typing and the like are merely secondary functions, a bonus if you like. The core usage is to read books and that's all. If something comes out that's cheap, has a large (9") screen and decent battery life then that's all I need. I'm not interested in any gimmicks such as playing mp3's and the like as I already have devices for those. KISS (to the manufacturers).

jerryz
August 1st, 2008, 10:24 PM
The it Ereader's aren't computers crowd are the same ones who say that their laptops play music just fine also why do they need any sort of a portable music player.... There's at least one in every crowd

TBOL3
August 1st, 2008, 11:41 PM
I don't want one. I'd rather buy a used EeePC for about the same price (or less), and use that.

Macintosh Sauce
August 2nd, 2008, 12:40 AM
Recently, I purchased an Amazon Kindle and I absolutely love it. I like reading mostly about history and politics, so getting this device has saved a lot of bookshelf space in my computer/study room.

See my review (http://www.jamesnrhodes.com/James_Nicholas_Rhodes/Weblog/Entries/2008/6/13_The_Amazon_Kindle_is_a_Game_Changer.html)...

So far, I have purchased 28 books - that is more than the physical books I have bought in the last year. The Kindle is allowing me to read much more than before and this is a good thing IMHO.

I don't mind being an early adopter, because I am having fun reading on the Kindle. It's very easy o the eyes.

Macintosh Sauce
August 2nd, 2008, 01:01 AM
eInk screens are a long way away from being useful as regular computer screens. #1, they are really only available as black & white right now. #2, the rendering is way too slow for video, etc. Maybe someday.

They are not the same technology and each has its own purpose.

In daylight and a natural light lamp in my computer/study room, the Kindle is quite easy to read and does not strain the eyes at all. I can read for hours without getting a headache which is really nice.

djsroknrol
August 2nd, 2008, 02:01 AM
Funny...the Kindle and Amazon's changing business plan was part of my final exam in one of my classes last semester.They had to evolve and I think it was a good move on their part.

B.O.T.....the idea of being able to get content in a portable device such as the Kindle is novel, but it doesn't fit me personally.

dunbrokin
April 26th, 2009, 11:14 PM
How well does the Kindle work with Ubuntu....I see problems with ejecting. I want to get one for my wife who runs Ubuntu on her machine...but she will freak out if she has to go to the command line every time she wants to eject the Kindle.

Greg
April 26th, 2009, 11:21 PM
How well does the Kindle work with Ubuntu....I see problems with ejecting. I want to get one for my wife who runs Ubuntu on her machine...but she will freak out if she has to go to the command line every time she wants to eject the Kindle.

I wasn't able to get it to mount at all in Arch. Didn't matter, the charge for sending books straight to the device is really cheap. You can combine as many as you like in a .rar for 10 cents.

Sef
April 26th, 2009, 11:36 PM
You can get locked out of a Kindle (http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2009/04/amazon-kindle-incidents-highlight-drm-limitations-once-again.ars), if Amazon feels that you have violated the policy terms.

dunbrokin
April 26th, 2009, 11:42 PM
I wasn't able to get it to mount at all in Arch. Didn't matter, the charge for sending books straight to the device is really cheap. You can combine as many as you like in a .rar for 10 cents.

That is true if you live in the US....I live in NZ where the wireless does not work.

Greg
April 26th, 2009, 11:56 PM
That is true if you live in the US....I live in NZ where the wireless does not work.

Ah... it is possible to hook it up to normal wireless, though.

dunbrokin
April 27th, 2009, 12:28 AM
Ah... it is possible to hook it up to normal wireless, though.

Depends on what you mean by normal wireless it has a USB port and links to the PC that way.

In any event, the information I am seeking is how user friendly Kindle is with Jaunty?

Firestem4
April 27th, 2009, 12:45 AM
I would consider buying a Kindle if it were not for the DRM and lock-outs. If I purchase a book in digital format and am not entitled and/or allowed to transfer it to my computer or other electronic media I refuse to buy it.

The problem isn't amazon fortunately, as Amazon is actually quite opposed to DRM. (THeir music store has no DRM on it.) The problem with the kindle service is the Publishing houses who refuse to offer the books unless it has these strict DRM's on them...Hasn't the rest of the industry taught them anything? *sigh*

dunbrokin
April 27th, 2009, 12:52 AM
I would consider buying a Kindle if it were not for the DRM and lock-outs. If I purchase a book in digital format and am not entitled and/or allowed to transfer it to my computer or other electronic media I refuse to buy it.

The problem isn't amazon fortunately, as Amazon is actually quite opposed to DRM. (THeir music store has no DRM on it.) The problem with the kindle service is the Publishing houses who refuse to offer the books unless it has these strict DRM's on them...Hasn't the rest of the industry taught them anything? *sigh*

I hear you...and you make important points..but I need some advice from somebody who has experience with Jaunty so that I can decide whether to buy a Kindle for my wife for her birthday or not...

Polygon
April 27th, 2009, 01:14 AM
You can get locked out of a Kindle (http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2009/04/amazon-kindle-incidents-highlight-drm-limitations-once-again.ars), if Amazon feels that you have violated the policy terms.

and thats exactly why i will not get one =P

MikeTheC
April 27th, 2009, 03:24 AM
I would consider getting a device such as a Kindle, but I have certain non-negotiable requirements:

1. Chipset itself must be very capable and general-purpose;
2. Firmware (apart from the OS itself) must be open-source;
3. The OS itself must be open-source;
4. Must have a speaker and a headphone jack;
5. Must have a high-resolution display with text readability quality *at least* (preferably better than) as good as Sony's e-Book reader thingy;
6. Must support multiple formats and not have a requirement to use DRM of any kind;
7. Must have at least a 48 hour battery run-time;
8. Must have a summonable OSK;
9. Must be capable of playing OGGs, MP3s and WMAs at the same time as serving up a book to read.
10. Must not cost above $99; preferably below $60.

To those who will either read this and think -- or are brave enough to read this and reply -- "Nobody would build a device that met those requirements!" all I can say is that I'm in no hurry whatsoever to buy an electronic book platform, so if they come out next Tuesday, or 20 years from now, or not until after I'm long dead and buried, then that's alright by me.

gymophett
April 27th, 2009, 03:39 AM
I actually do plan on buying one in the future.

Denestria
April 27th, 2009, 05:14 AM
How well does the Kindle work with Ubuntu....I see problems with ejecting. I want to get one for my wife who runs Ubuntu on her machine...but she will freak out if she has to go to the command line every time she wants to eject the Kindle.

My husband bought me one for our anniversary last April. I've never had any trouble using it in Ubuntu. As soon as I took it out of the box and plugged it in Ubuntu recognized it and I was able to copy text files to it right from the file browser. I've used it almost everyday for the last year at home and while traveling. I love it.

CJ Master
April 27th, 2009, 05:31 AM
How well does the Kindle work with Ubuntu....I see problems with ejecting. I want to get one for my wife who runs Ubuntu on her machine...but she will freak out if she has to go to the command line every time she wants to eject the Kindle.

Simple... make a launcher on the desktop named "Eject Kindle" and have it unmount it when she doubleclicks on it.

Wiebelhaus
April 27th, 2009, 05:38 AM
Do you plan on buying a amazon kindle reading device? link (http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-Amazons-Wireless-Reading-Device/dp/B000FI73MA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1213719669&sr=8-1) I must say, it looks like this could be the start of something great, but I will hold off untill the new paper screen is farther in development and the price goes down.

I don't like DRM and I like to trade traditional books with people.

dspari1
April 27th, 2009, 05:49 AM
No. If I want to read something, I get a book. If I want to read something in an electronic format, I use a computer.

One reason to change to an electronic format to support the environment and be green.

Wiebelhaus
April 27th, 2009, 07:28 AM
One reason to change to an electronic format to support the environment and be green.

Good point , I didn't actually think of that but the DRM thing and the inability to loan it to my friend a deal breaker.

MikeTheC
April 28th, 2009, 08:44 PM
One reason to change to an electronic format to support the environment and be green.

I fundamentally disagree with that statement.

Paper can be recycled. It is, in fact, far more recyclable than the synthetics and other crap that electronic devices are made out of. Secondly, even when the end products themselves are safe and enviro-friendly, the processes used to produce the components (or sub-components) are themselves sometimes very unfriendly to people and the environment alike.

Moreover, books are an "analog" technology that are not easily use- or rights-restricted, and I'm one of those people who think that rights and liberty are every bit as significant, consequential and important as a clean environment.

On the whole, I'd just as soon read a book.

Giant Speck
April 28th, 2009, 08:50 PM
There's nothing more relaxing then sitting in a warm cozy chair with a good book.

Replacing that book with an electronic device just ruins the comfort.

Giant Speck
April 28th, 2009, 08:51 PM
Also:

http://www.penny-arcade.com/images/2009/20090309.jpg

billgoldberg
April 28th, 2009, 09:27 PM
Do you plan on buying a amazon kindle reading device? link (http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-Amazons-Wireless-Reading-Device/dp/B000FI73MA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1213719669&sr=8-1) I must say, it looks like this could be the start of something great, but I will hold off untill the new paper screen is farther in development and the price goes down.

Not in a trillion years.

billgoldberg
April 28th, 2009, 09:32 PM
Also:

http://www.penny-arcade.com/images/2009/20090309.jpg

Lol, great one.

In the words of one Homer J. Simpson:


It's funny cuz it's true.

Dr. C
July 19th, 2009, 10:57 PM
No. This is a perfect example of what is wrong with DRM, and devices that support DRM (such as the Kindle) or Operating Systems that support DRM (such as Microsoft Windows or Mac OS). Amazon choosing arbitrarily to delete eBooks from the Kindle. For the ultimate in irony Amazon chose some titles by George Orwell: 1984 and Animal Farm

http://www.boingboing.net/2009/07/17/amazon-zaps-purchase.html

This quote is classic
As one of my readers noted, its like Barnes & Noble sneaking into our homes in the middle of the night, taking some books that weve been reading off our nightstands, and leaving us a check on the coffee table.

For the lack of a better word DRM is Orwellian.

lisati
July 19th, 2009, 10:58 PM
I thought "kindle" was something you did to fires.....

Dr. C
July 20th, 2009, 02:01 AM
I thought "kindle" was something you did to fires.....

Like to burn books.

Giant Speck
July 20th, 2009, 02:29 AM
Kindles ruin the experience of sitting in a cozy chair with some hot chocolate and enjoying a good book. There are just some things in life that shouldn't be electronic.

Friqenstein
October 2nd, 2009, 07:22 AM
Hey all,

I was going through the previous posts regarding the Kindle (original I'm guessing) and was wondering what people's thoughts are now that the DX is out?
It has a few extra features, as well as being a bit larger.

I know all you 'book fans' out there like the smell of paper, and love to kill trees, and want to flip a page, and get fresh ink all over your fingers as your naturally oily and sweaty palms/fingers rub/smear the ink on your precious pages... but I quite frankly think this is a nice device... for Me anyway.
I understand that some people want to sit in front of a cozy fire and curl up reading a nice hard-back book for all intents and purposes, and that's great for those that can do that.
Some say ".. if I want to read a book I get a real book, if I want to read a pdf I get a computer.." again, why? If that is what you are limited to, or prefer, fine. But you can't always lug around your desktop or even your laptop. Can't always have time to pull your laptop out of your bag at the airport, boot into whatever OS you are using, fish for that PDF you wanted to read through then sit there with your laptop getting warm, draining battery power and having to sit in a position that supports the laptop on your lap. No dice for me.

So, don't think I'm thrashing all of you book lovers. Because I'm not. I still love the smell of a freshly printed book, but only certain types of paper. Yes I'm strange.

Anyway, let me explain...
I work overseas. A lot! And when I say A Lot, I mean it. Every month I'm traveling to a different country for a job (if I'm not headed home for break). This means that I cannot carry around thousands of pounds/kilos of paper just because I want to read books. A device like the Kindle DX is ideal for somebody like me. I have to pack as light as possible because A) carrying extra crap as weight is costly (cuz airlines are charging for oxygen now a days), B) waste of paper, C) waste of money... etc.
So with my job, there are times when I have nothing but time on my hands to rip through novels, tech manuals, pdfs, etc. Then there are times when I have no time at all to read anything for the duration of my stay in whatever foreign country I'm working in. In this instance, if I were to bring out several thick novels and thick tech manuals, it would be a waste because I may not have time to read them. Then I'd have to not only lug around all that weight going back home, but I'd have to pay the stupid airlines yet again to recheck all that excess weight in my checked baggage.

Again, I know that 'normal' people don't do this, so that is fine. But those of us who are travelers, or just plain non-static in general will reap the benefits from this device and any others like it. I think it's a great idea and plan on obtaining a Kindle DX just as soon as they drop that ridiculous $400 price tag. Hopefully they do it around xmas time so I can 'Merry xmas-to-me'.

Exodist
October 2nd, 2009, 08:57 AM
I dont read, I wait for it to come on the TV. :KS

Andavane
November 10th, 2009, 07:54 PM
ebook readers (I have a cybook gen3) are wonderful for the disabled, and if you have a hard job holding heavy books. You can fill in odd minutes of the day: car parks, waiting for your friend, in the doctors, all those odd minutes of the day. You'll be surprised how many books you get through!

Restful on the eye, put away and pick up at a moment's notice - and hey! no worries abut taking loads of stuff on holiday as not one gram is added to your luggage for books - have a library if you want.

I have the Concise Oxford English English Dictionary on mine, and you can look up most words and grow erudite and educated (the Kindle comes these days with an Oxford American Dictionary).

My only gripe is that more books aren't converted to ebook format (and that there are different varieties) but hopefully that will change.

The ebook reader with its soft screen and E-ink has transformed my life.

Kind regards

John

PS: There is a cartridge with 100 Classics available for the Nintendo DS.