PDA

View Full Version : [ubuntu] Please help a senior citizen!



9jlf
June 5th, 2008, 04:58 PM
Have been getting more and more frustrated with Windows and the way it eats memory and generally slows down everything so, having read a short article about Linux, downloaded Ubuntu on to my D drive, which is an empty partition on my 80Gb HDD. Having downloaded, how do I activate the prog as Windows will obviously not read the set up? Do I have to download another prog that allows me to open this Linux OS on my D Drive? Afraid I am not that au fait with PC technicalities so any help and advice, in simple terms, would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

avtolle
June 5th, 2008, 05:09 PM
Have been getting more and more frustrated with Windows and the way it eats memory and generally slows down everything so, having read a short article about Linux, downloaded Ubuntu on to my D drive, which is an empty partition on my 80Gb HDD. Having downloaded, how do I activate the prog as Windows will obviously not read the set up? Do I have to download another prog that allows me to open this Linux OS on my D Drive? Afraid I am not that au fait with PC technicalities so any help and advice, in simple terms, would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
First of all, one must burn the downloaded file to a CD. What was downloaded was the iso file, which, from what you say, is now residing on the D drive. So, you cannot just "activate" the program as you asked. http://psychocats.net/ubuntu/iso discusses how to burn the iso file to a CD. Once the iso file is burnt to CD, then it needs to be installed from the CD. The same site has a discussion about installing.

avtolle
June 5th, 2008, 05:35 PM
Just had another thought. You might use the Wubi installer to install from the iso (both Wubi and the iso must be in the same "folder"). If that's what you want to do, which installs Ubuntu as a file under Windows, then you would need to d/l the correct version of Wubi (i.e., 8.04 for Ubuntu 8.04) from the wubi site. This allows you to use Ubuntu without partitioning, etc. However, since you downloaded to your D drive, I'm unsure of how the Wubi install might work. Back in a bit with (hopefully) some more information.

EDIT: http://wubi-installer.org/ is the site to obtain Wubi. Again, it may use the file you have downloaded, so long as both are in the "same folder" under Windows.

EDIT 2: http://wubi-installer.org/faq.php is the FAQ portion of the site, the first thing there discusses installation.

I hope this helps you.

buntunub
June 5th, 2008, 05:42 PM
Look at your D: drive where you downloaded the Ubuntu .iso to. You should see the file there. Double click it. It will either launch the Wubi installer or it will open up the .iso file where you will then be able to see the Wubi.exe file, then double click on that and then you will see the Wubi install wizard. Go through the install Wizard (its guided and easy to use), then when its done, just reboot and you will then have the option to boot in to your new Ubuntu system. Wubi is not as fully functional as a real Ubuntu install, but its pretty close. You can also burn the .iso file to a CD and then just reboot into Ubuntu from the CD itself. It will be slower than a full Hard Drive install, but you will be able to see what Ubuntu is like and if it can handle your Hardware. You can then install from the LiveCD Desktop, or you can install from the LiveCD boot menu. Ubuntu gives you lots of choices, so just pick the one that works best for you.

krlhc8
June 5th, 2008, 06:05 PM
Might I add that you are extremely brave for being a senior citizen and installing "any" operating system by yourself, but I guess you have all day to figure this stuff out ;). My grandpa (age 73) built his own computer and still goes to college, so: "to each his own."

avtolle
June 5th, 2008, 06:17 PM
Hold on there; one may be a "senior citizen" without being in one's dotage. Also, the definition differs from application to application; I'm a "senior citizen" for many purposes at the young age of 58. :-)

wpshooter
June 5th, 2008, 06:42 PM
Might I add that you are extremely brave for being a senior citizen and installing "any" operating system by yourself, but I guess you have all day to figure this stuff out ;). My grandpa (age 73) built his own computer and still goes to college, so: "to each his own."

Yes, I also as a near senior citizen, take just a small bit of offense at that insinuation. I have installed Ubuntu and other distributions of Linux and other O/Ss completely unassisted. However, I have been using computers before most of the persons who are on this forum were probably even borned. So, don't think that you youngsters have all the knowledge that is available. For instance, I bet if I mentioned an IBM 029 card sorter, most of the persons on this forum probably have zero idea as to what I am talking about !!!

Thanks.

avtolle
June 5th, 2008, 06:54 PM
Just as I would wager if I mentioned an IBM 026 key punch, most of those here wouldn't know about that to which I refer!. :-)

wpshooter, if I may, when did you start using computers? My first "computing" experience was in college, in 1969; submission of card decks for batch processing (using Fortran), etc., then until 1980, didn't do much with any knowledge I'd obtained, Been using personal computers for about 28 years, and have installed many an OS myself (Linux and otherwise) without an attendant to hold my hand...

Now, back to the topic. Hopefully, the OP has followed buntunub's post if he wants to try a Wubi install.

wpshooter
June 5th, 2008, 08:06 PM
Avtolle:

Looks like we started about the same era. First exposure to computers was in business college in the 1968 to 1970 time frame. The guy that taught the computer classes at the college hired me to run the old (I think, if I am remembering correctly) IBM system 60. He was using the college's hardware to run an accounting business he was running on the side. If you might remember on those old systems, the programs and data were feed into the computer using IBM punch cards. So everytime you wanted to run any type of program, you had to run a stack of punch cards about as long as your arm thru the hopper to get the program and data processed. Of course, all those punch cards had to be in the correct order before running them thru the computer or you would not get anything meaningful, which in turn meant that all of the cards had to be sorted on the old IBM 029 or similar card sorters.

Boy if some of these young kids coming out of these technical schools today could go back somehow and see how far we have come since the late 1960s it would blow their minds. But I supposed on the same note, if you and I could see where things had come from the earlier decades to our point in the 60s, it would probably blow our minds too.

Keep those components properly cooled and you will have a whole lot fewer problems.

Have a great day.

avtolle
June 5th, 2008, 08:15 PM
Probably an IBM System 360, IIRC. :-)

Yep, keep the components properly cooled, and things went much better.

And, have a great day, too, wpshooter; you've made me smile with some memories (of events which, when they happened, like dropping a deck, weren't all that pleasant, but cause a chuckle now).