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View Full Version : How happy are you with Breezy?



thnogueira
October 20th, 2005, 01:03 PM
I've seen a lot of people complaning about Breezy. I'd like to have this feeling translated to numbers. So I've opened this thread.Please vote, and if you want, tell me why.

thnogueira
October 20th, 2005, 01:12 PM
I probably should starting...

Well, since I want use a computer as a tool, and I don't have enough time to deal with incompatibity proplems anymore, I'm very disappointed with Breezy. Hoary was working like I charm.
Next time I'm gonna realy consider the question: Why to upgrade if what I have is ok?

Pablo_Escobar
October 20th, 2005, 01:21 PM
I must say I'm dissapionted with Breezy, I was happy with Hoary.
I decided to switch to Fedora Core 4. Stability to the max, while having bleeding edge packages.
It's sad for me, I love Ubuntu, and I hope to back with it when Dapper hits the mirrors.

Suzan
October 20th, 2005, 01:29 PM
I am very happy with Breezy. It works like a charm for me!

SilentCacophony
October 20th, 2005, 01:38 PM
I gave it a 7-8.

I'll qualify that by saying that I've personally had few problems with it, but I was hoping that it would have progressed a bit more in the 'new user friendliness' area for this release. It was a great transition for the code-base, though, what with the gcc upgrade and such, so it's to be expected that a lot of focus had to go in that area. And the recent legal issues with the extras, which weren't necessarily predictable, have confused a lot of newcomers.

I first tried Ubuntu only about 2 months ago, and after learning the ropes with Hoary, the transition to Breezy has been a breeze. ;) I'm afraid that my rating above is very much tainted by my high expectations for Ubuntu. If I were to judge it against other distros without that factored in, I'd probably go with a 9.

I believe the the hype that currently surrounds Ubuntu is a bit premature at the moment, and has led to some disgruntled newcomers all too often. GNU/Linux, in general, is not for everyone. Ubuntu is very young as a distro. At some point, though, I believe that Ubuntu will come much closer the ideal it has than it is right now. I'd rather see people trying it later, when it's more mature, than trying it now, and giving up in frustration.

The fact that I'm quite aligned with the ideals of GNU and the FSF, along with my desire to learn new things, and have as much control over my computer as possible, makes Ubuntu perfect for me, though. I'm quite happy to have to tinker with things here and there to get them to work as I like, because that's what gives me the satisfaction of knowing that my OS is mine, not some highly-abstracted OS which hides all of the inner workings from you, and which is probably destined to be remote-controlled if the big businesses have thier way (read: 'trusted computing'.)

Stormy Eyes
October 20th, 2005, 01:43 PM
I haven't had any problems with Breezy. I just upgraded my wife from Hoary to Breezy last night, and she likes it just fine. Only problem with hers that I've noticed is that some GTK2 theme engines for custom themes I did are missing.

Zenith_
October 20th, 2005, 01:44 PM
I'm no linux expert by any means, I'm fairly new to linux. I've been running Ubuntu since Hoary, and Breezy for me has been great. :)

pinoyskull
October 20th, 2005, 01:54 PM
i gave it a 7-8 rating

Stealth
October 20th, 2005, 01:58 PM
I gave 9-10, the only thing not working on my Breezy Dell Laptop are suspend and hibernate, and Breezy works silky smooth on my mom's computer. :)

ember
October 20th, 2005, 01:59 PM
I voted 3-4, because I'm actually not too happy with Breezy. It took me a lot longer to get everything halfway working in Breezy than it did in Hoary.
Most annoying was the GRUB bug that took me two hours to figure out (it just hangs at install if your root-Partition ends above 100G).
Maybe that will change over time, especially now that the PLF cares for integration of some non-free stuff that is asked for quite often.

Best,
ember

Kuolio
October 20th, 2005, 02:16 PM
I give it 7-8, that's because there are few annoying bugs that I've encountered, and some difficulties still to overcome like getting ATI drivers to work. They were working sometime about RC4, since then there has been lots of updates and at some point, my fglrx-driver has stopped working. Bummer. Need to reconfigure/re-install it.

Hmm, what else.. breezy seems to be bit slow. The overall experience isn't quite as snappy as Hoary was.

gabhla
October 20th, 2005, 02:23 PM
I rate it 9-10. Maybe I'm too new to know any better, but honestly have no issues. It simply worked. I was expecting at least some configuration issues...but nope. I've had it up and running for over a week, and it's great.

mstlyevil
October 20th, 2005, 02:28 PM
I voted 7-8. I will first say that I personaly give it a high 8 because I had relatively few problems setting up Kubuntu/Ubuntu. Kubuntu is a lot more stable than it was under hoary and does not crash everytime you start an application. I wanted to give KDE a good run and now I am able to do so because it is as fast in breezy as Gnome was in hoary. I can't give it a full 10 yet because it could still be a little more Newbie friendly. Also other distros like Suse and Linspire do a little better job with the skinning and eye candy. I know eye candy has little to do with how a OS runs, but it does give newbies an impression that the new os has it's act together. Also Breezy could detect and run DMA on by default so that is one less thing a newbie has to learn and find out how to do so they could run DVD's. One last thing that in my mind will keep all Linux distros from being 10's is the fact there is no paid version of DVD playing software so that people in certain countries can legally play DVD's.If we could just buy a media player with all the codecs then the issue of making it hard to access codecs to keep from being sued is no problem.

Wes24
October 20th, 2005, 02:31 PM
I'd like to think of Ubuntu not just as a Linux distro, but more of an experience. Ubuntu isn't just an OS on your computer, it involves also a highly active and dedicated community with a clear goal: free-of-charge software, software tools which are usable by people in their local language and despite any disabilities and customizability of software. It would be na´ve to think that this goal will be reached with a fingersnap. In that respect, I think Breezy is an important step in reaching the mentioned goal. Sure, some things don't work as I would like them to work. It will come.

jwb
October 20th, 2005, 02:35 PM
It's just worked for me. No problems.

In fact, I like it a bit more than Hoary (which I liked a bit more than Warty). So for me, it's progressing nicely.

Might help that I simply aceept the default install and add little- all I need is email, browser and OOo.

Hoary didn't detect my video card properly- Breezy did. That was nice.

Brunellus
October 20th, 2005, 02:37 PM
5-6. Not too displeased, but not too pleased, either.

The Good:
I like Gnome 2.12. The soft window-blink and the smoother transitions to/from the screensaver are nice. The former is particularly useful when I'm running GAIM.

Some of the new GUI system-administration tools are quite nice. I'm not afraid to use the command line, and have begun to spend a good bit of time in text-mode lately, but the GUI tools are nice to have.

Bootsplash and Gnomesplash screens look nice. Eyecandy, yeah, but nice.

In the packages: Gimp and gimp plugin packages have been updated nicely. the dcraw plugin for gimp which can be apt-gotten supports the RAW mode of my camera now, which is a nice and useful addition.

The Bad:
The upgrade was not all that smooth for me, for reasons I don't know. I needed to run apt-get -f to get things working right. I can't get X when I boot into the K7 kernel I was looking forward to using (possibly an nvidia/xorg.conf issue? but if it works for i386, why not k7? must read more I guess...).

My console font seems to have changed. Not presently a dealkiller, but irritating.

The right-click menu in GNOME no longer brings up any really useful options. I used to be able to open OOwriter from here, as well as a gterm. Now, all I can do is change the background. This is a total step backwards from Hoary and even Warty.

so all in all, a useful mid-term solution. I await dapper in six months' time. Good luck, devs.

canadianwriterman
October 20th, 2005, 02:45 PM
I gave Breezy a 7-8 rating. I think most people would agree that Linux isn't for everyone. It requires tinkering and that's something not every desktop user is prepared to do. I love the tinkering. But, I believe the objective is to gradually move toward a distribution that requires less and less tinkering. When I see so many posts about problems mounting drives and nvidea (not sure if that's to spell it), I see that as something that needs to be rectified. Ideally, Ubuntu should do what the user expects - automatically - and then allow the other to take it beyong what he or she can with other OSs.

When people say that Linux will never be for everyone, I don't believe it. Look how far distros have come in just the past year. Who would have thought there could even have been an Ubuntu or Linspire or any other distro targetted at Windows users. The day is approaching when Linux is a credible and serious threat to Windows market share. And, when it comes... watch out!

nocturn
October 20th, 2005, 02:48 PM
I gave it 7-8. I had a few problems on the upgrade, but I did it after the RC, not the full release, so it is unfair to use these against Breezy.

Why 7-8
- Breezy adds little functionality to Hoary for me (so no higher quote)
- Lack of Propolice, SELinux, etc. by default.
+ Breezy is *much* faster then Hoary!
+ I love Usplash
+ OpenOffice 2 by default

All-in-all, I'm happy with the update, although Warty->Hoary was more exiting.

nocturn
October 20th, 2005, 02:57 PM
I gave Breezy a 7-8 rating. I think most people would agree that Linux isn't for everyone. It requires tinkering and that's something not every desktop user is prepared to do.

I do agree with you that not every users wants to do this, but Windows requires quite a bit more tinkering not only to work, but to be vaguely secure.
On windows, you desperately need a firewall, anti-virus and anti-spyware, which is something most end-users are not yet able to deal with or understand.

The big difference is that most people using Windows
1# buy it preinstalled
2# have a system full of spyware without knowing
3# only notice a virus infection when it impairs the functionality of the PC (so acting as a SPAM relay goes unnoticed).

S29K
October 20th, 2005, 03:04 PM
I gave Breezy a 7-8.

I installed Hoary on my home and work systems a few months ago to see if it was possible to rid myself of WinXP and all the problems associated with running a Windows machine. It has been a learning experience for me but a worthwhile one.

I use my home machine for ripping CDs for my MP3 streamer box as well as basic internet/e-mail use. I am a PC Gamer as well and hoped to get WineX/Cedega running smoothly enough so that I could get rid of Windows at home but the combination of the game I currently play, Guild Wars, and the fact that I have an ATI video card, (X800XL) make this an impossibility at the present time. For my home use, Breezy has been great, improvements to the eye-candy and GUI tools are a nice upgrade.

At work I had hoped to again replace Windows altogether but have found that Wine, for all its accomplishments is not perfect yet (I know its Alpha). I have 2 applications that I absolutely must run as they are somewhat proprietary and have no Linux Equivalents. One is payroll software, the other is a terminal emulator that supports TVI955, something not easily found in 'free' apps. It took me awhile to get everything working but Hoary (the version I'm running as I'm typing this) runs like a charm. I give Hoary a 10.

Breezy however, will not cooperate with me on a couple of things. The version of Wine in the Breezy repository, sans the very handy Winetools, exhibits strange graphical behaviour in my emulator software after trying very hard to even get it to install. I even tried searching the net for an older version of Wine that works with Winetools and compiled that but still have the same problems installing/running this particular Windows App (ERALink32 for Reynolds & Reynolds Automotive Dealers, IBM wIntegrate). I am aware that this is probably Wine's fault but I mention it anyway as the experience is different with each distro.

The inclusion of support for HP printers is a nice feature but the default hplip drivers in the Breezy Repository exclude the HP Toolbox/Device Manager which I need to access the photo card reader built-in to my HP 2600 all-in-one.

I could probably get this working by installing the drivers from HP directly but the failure of Wine to run my most important app has forced me to fall back on Hoary and wait for Dapper.

Kudos to the dev team for keeping up the fight and making some improvements to Ubuntu that will impress the majority of users. I eagerly await Dapper in 6 months time.

dbott67
October 20th, 2005, 03:42 PM
I give Breezy a 9. While not everything 'just worked', after some tinkering and perusing the forums, I have everything working as well as can be expected on this old P2-300.

Mind you, I'm only using this computer for basic computer stuff (surfing, e-mail, a few MP3s, etc.). My next computer will be dual-boot Ubuntu & XP, but I will only use XP for those tasks that I can't complete in Ubuntu.

Personally, I have never had 'security' issues with Windows, so my reasons for 'switching' are just for personal/professional development. All computers are susceptible to malicious software, whether it be viruses, spyware or rootkits. With it's much higher profile, Windows is an easy target, plus the vast majority of people do not take appropriate precautions to secure their PC (OS & application updates, AV, firewalls, etc.) If Linux starts to make a significant dent in the MS marketshare, you can be sure that virus/spyware/malware writers will start focusing their attention on it. But I digress...

Overall, the developers have done a tremendous job.

-Dave

poofyhairguy
October 20th, 2005, 04:06 PM
I gave it a 7-8.

But the main reason for a lower rating is kinda out of Ubuntu's hands. If the backport server was ready with its fun extras (like codecs) and things that I really want in Ubuntu from Sid (newer zsnes) then I would have voted one group higher. So in like a month it will raise for me.

I refuse to give it the highest score until Ubuntu has a GUI tool to configure xorg.conf.

Riverside
October 20th, 2005, 04:16 PM
I refuse to give it the highest score until Ubuntu has a GUI tool to configure xorg.conf.SuSE's SaX2 X11 configuration tool is superb in my experience, and works extremely well. According to /usr/share/doc/packages/sax2/LICENSE in recent (at least since SuSE 9.2) SuSE versions, SaX2 is licensed under the GPL (this wasn't always the case, and SaX2 was at one point non-GPL'ed, SuSE proprietary software).

If the Ubuntu developers are looking for a graphical X11 configuration tool, they would do well to consider using that one.

Riverside
October 20th, 2005, 04:18 PM
I've given Breezy 9-10. Many of the issues that people seem to be complaining of appear to be related to the results when having carried out a dist-upgrade from a previous version. This isn't really an issue with Breezy, imo - it's the old story that clean installs tend to work better than version upgrades, regardless of distribution/version.

Brunellus
October 20th, 2005, 04:35 PM
SuSE's SaX2 X11 configuration tool is superb in my experience, and works extremely well. According to /usr/share/doc/packages/sax2/LICENSE in recent (at least since SuSE 9.2) SuSE versions, SaX2 is licensed under the GPL (this wasn't always the case, and SaX2 was at one point non-GPL'ed, SuSE proprietary software).

If the Ubuntu developers are looking for a graphical X11 configuration tool, they would do well to consider using that one.
does SaX2 depend on qt libs?

Psquared
October 20th, 2005, 04:44 PM
I gave it a 7-8. If I could get my wireless adapter to work I'd give it a 9. I do think the 686 kernel is better for my equipment but I've patched Breezy together so I am think I may just make a copy of my "My Documents" folder and then do a clean install of Breezy 686 from my ISO and let it update and see if that fixes everything. I can't even get Ndiswrapper to work. (way too complicated and time-consuming for me) I've always like the simplicity of Ubuntu so I'd like to stick with it.

FC4 is getting raves, but it installs to much stuff I don't need. I don't like KDE, or the other WMs (I've tried most of them) so I only use Gnome or Xfce.

Lovechild
October 20th, 2005, 04:45 PM
0 - I switched back to Fedora Core following the sad statement on Dapper and proactive security. As far as Breezy goes in terms of just working and such, it's a nice distro if I didn't care about deploying security for to everyone's safety, Breezy would probably get 6-7 as it's a decent distro an the selection of software is excellent.

poofyhairguy
October 20th, 2005, 04:52 PM
SuSE's SaX2 X11 configuration tool is superb in my experience, and works extremely well. According to /usr/share/doc/packages/sax2/LICENSE in recent (at least since SuSE 9.2) SuSE versions, SaX2 is licensed under the GPL (this wasn't always the case, and SaX2 was at one point non-GPL'ed, SuSE proprietary software).

If the Ubuntu developers are looking for a graphical X11 configuration tool, they would do well to consider using that one.


Its a QT app. Kubuntu might have it, and then we will be telling people to install that one app to get things to work in Ubuntu. But the developers would never include a QT app.

jbcard
October 20th, 2005, 05:05 PM
I am not very happy.

Problems: - DNS problems with internet
- No automount in desktop for cd-rom, HD, etc
- I coul not install RealPlayer 10. Problem with gcc library (lib...5)!

I have to say the soud works very well (at least!). I think mepis is a better
distro for Linux newbies.

Riverside
October 20th, 2005, 05:22 PM
Problems: - DNS problems with internetWhat problems exactly? There aren't that many issues that one can experience in terms of DNS, and almost all of those are more likely to be related to the customer facing caching resolvers provided for customer use by one's ISP. Many (particularly in the case of primarily residentially focused ISPs) caching resolvers provided for customer use by ISPs are under specified and/or overloaded, the ISPs in turn occasionally employ hacks with undesirable side effects (overriding default and specified TTLs in queried external zone files with longer values for example), and the whole thing can quickly become a bit of a mess.

There is thankfully though a remedy for Ubuntu (and other Linux) users, which works very well. First, install Bind 9 using apt-get install bind9. Once installed, edit /etc/resolv.conf to read:

nameserver 127.0.0.1

Your machine will then be running its own caching resolver, and will be independent of any caching resolvers supplied by your ISP. If the caching resolvers supplied for customer use by your ISP are causing the DNS issues that you are experiencing, this should resolve those issues.

canadianwriterman
October 20th, 2005, 05:23 PM
I do agree with you that not every users wants to do this, but Windows requires quite a bit more tinkering not only to work, but to be vaguely secure.
On windows, you desperately need a firewall, anti-virus and anti-spyware, which is something most end-users are not yet able to deal with or understand.

The big difference is that most people using Windows
1# buy it preinstalled
2# have a system full of spyware without knowing
3# only notice a virus infection when it impairs the functionality of the PC (so acting as a SPAM relay goes unnoticed).

Touche. I forgot about that kind of "tinkering" that Windows needs!

Qrk
October 20th, 2005, 05:57 PM
I've been very happy with breezy. Its not that different from hoary, but the things that have changed have worked very smoothly. I've found it to be quite snappy, also. It was a little buggy the first few days after the final release, but that seems to have calmed down some.

mokeyjoe
October 20th, 2005, 07:15 PM
I'm holding off upgrading to Breezy as I only installed Hoary a couple of weeks ago and it runs just fine. I'm of the "if it ain't broke don't fix it" school of thought and as everything is running really nicely I'm going to stick with what I know. Hell, I was using Windows 98 until last year! Besides I haven't heard of any improvemnts in Breezy that have really grabbed me and persuaded me to throw caution to the wind and try it. Should I ever need to reinstall or if I get hold of another old computer I'd probably install it though.

I'm more interested in what Dapper has to offer, which brings me to the question: will I be able to upgrade from Hoary straight to Dapper when its released, or will I need a fresh install?

angkor
October 20th, 2005, 07:22 PM
7-8 for me, but I'm a critical kind of person. Something has to be _extremely_ good to earn a 9-10.

The upgrade was tricky with quite a few apt-get -f installs , but in the end everything worked fine. A major improvement from my Debian days. I think it's a bit better than Hoary because it just looks better and it's a bit snappier on my system. The included Starter Guide in System -> Help is very nice too for those new to Ubuntu.

I think people's hopes were set a bit too high for the new release, there's only so much you can improve in 6 months.

My appreciation goes out to all the Ubuntu devs for providing me with such a beautiful (and free!) OS.

Wolki
October 20th, 2005, 07:31 PM
I'd give it an 8. A well-done desktop, good hardware support, and usually well-working programs. Still a lot of room for improvements, of course, but we'll get there. A lot of annoying bugs are fixed (yay for new esd!) and a few new ones introduced, but that's how software works. I'm happy and it rocks a lot, but I have even higher hopes for the Drake. Good release.

stoffepojken
October 20th, 2005, 08:14 PM
I gave breezy 7-8. I like both totem and rhythmbox and they was working just fine for me in hoary but not in Breezy. Rhythmbox does not play my streams from streamtuner and totem-xine does not play my favorite videostream . I have the same codecs that I had in hoary. A strange thing is that gxine plays the same stream. I thought that gxine and totem was just a gui for the xine engine. However I dont like that I cant use Totem and RB thats why I gave it 7-8.

Besides that it works like a charm

Kristoffer

dspp
October 20th, 2005, 09:08 PM
I give it a solid 6. Though I got it up and running for what I need a box to do in a rather short period of time, my general feeling (and I may be alone on this) is that 5.04 seemed sturdier out of the box than 5.10.

It's only been a few days so I'll have to wait a while to fully judge. Or I can simply wait the five months and upgrade to 6.04. That is certanly a good aspect of the distribution.

jdodson
October 20th, 2005, 10:55 PM
All* of my Hoary issues were fixed in Breezy. Plus it is a Gnome lovers paradise to boot. Latest sofware, etc, etc, etc.

I gave it a 9.

* - all the issues I had with Hoary that I can recall that is.

irish rebel
October 20th, 2005, 11:51 PM
it took me two hours from install to gt my desktop to where I want it only bad thing is totem crist it suck big you know whats, i have acid rip mplayer and xine for dvd and ripped movies cinelerra for video editing fphoto for pictures eterape to watch my network and terminal services to connect to my server at work , ubuntu is king mostly because of the community .Because out of the box its no differant than fedora lacks mp3 and all media codecs , but when you get sources it is a beutifull thing.

Ubunted
October 21st, 2005, 01:24 AM
I'd say 90%. My sound worked out of the box, which it didn't in Hoary. Everything else installed very smoothly. My only issue is that Azureus is slow as tar.

raublekick
October 21st, 2005, 02:06 AM
I'll say 9-10 compared to my experience with other distros in the past year, 7-8 based on how well I wish it worked.

I'm basically going to echo what others have said, but this is also how I see it.

Breezy works like a charm compared to Hoary. I couldn't get a lot of things working in Hoary and abandoned it after two days. Everything I need worked out of the box with Breezy, and it didn't take long at all to get codecs and stuff to work. Things were going very well until today.

Today I installed the 686 kernel and some things have been acting weird. Glxgears and planetpenguin-racer cause 100% cpu usage and I can't use mouse, keyboard, or gamepad in pp-r anymore. I'm going to try going back to the 386 kernel when I get a chance, because I really haven't noticed an improvement thus far.

There are some other minor issues I have, some of which aren't really inherant to Ubuntu, but rather Linux or the programs themselves.

Ubuntu has proven to me that Linux is well on its way to the mainstream world. Codecs and such are keeping it held back though, that's for sure.

This past weekend I really got a glimpse at the beauty of Linux when I decided to completely repartition my drives. I moved XP and Ubuntu onto the same drive and kept my other one as storage. I completely forgot about how barren Windows is after a fresh install. Video was crap, no sound at all, and there were no useful programs. It took several hours to go through Windows Update just so I could install my video drivers, and then today Windows didn't see my sound drivers that I installed (but after a reboot it saw them again!).

Linux is very different than Windows, this has been made clear to me. Getting everything I need to work in Windows is easy, it just takes time, lots of time. Getting things to work in Linux is hard, but that's mostly because I am still fairly new to Linux. However, distros like Ubuntu provide a very well working environment right after an install.

I've gone from using Linux simply to do some school work (programming) to using it as my main OS, and only going to Windows for work and if there is something that I absolutely cannot figure out how to do in Ubuntu.

asimon
October 21st, 2005, 09:12 AM
7-8, not more. It's a nice distro, everthing works mostly out of the box and it has a nice software selection. But so do many distros out there. Some other distros are more interesting from a technical point of view, like fedora which is leading in terms of security, i.e. proactive security and selinux, or suse with nice things like delta-rpms, yast (yes, it's a great tool for people who don't want to use editors to change config files), preloading, beagle and xen, or Mandriva with superfast booting.

Ubuntu is a fine distro with a great community but in technical terms it's behind the leaders. Thus 7-8.

arctic
October 22nd, 2005, 01:45 PM
3-4

It works okay, but what I dislike is:
- borked root account (when you set one up, you will rn into trouble!)
- update notifier only noftifies me when already I run apt-get from the cli. Thanks. I don't need a tool that tells me that there are updates when I finished installing them already.
- security is still a mess (or a non-issue) in ubuntu. Ever heard of good firewalls, SELinux,...?

What is good: Most packages work without problems and it looks very polished. But looks don't make a distro great.

I use 5.10 on my laptop because it works quite well on it (and it's rarely connected to the internet), but my main workbox will remain Fedora. du to root and security reasons.

Goober
October 22nd, 2005, 06:42 PM
9-10. It works. It's stable. Reliable. Secure. Has lots of great programs instantly available.

Keep in mind that I have yet to actually try another Linux Distro. I am comparing Breezy to Windows XP, and I have had nothing but trouble with Windows. Heck, I was in Windows just yesterday working on some school stuff in M$ Office. It logged me in fine, then it decided to die when I tried to open Excel. After waiting for about 2 minutes, it decided to work. Then Excel was being weird, and decided to not save directly to my Memory Stick, which I keep my files on. So I had to save it to my desktop, and click and drag. And lets not even mention that Firefox was abnormally slow. Oh, and my internet wasn't working. And I was being assaulted by popups from Microsoft telling me the world was going to end if I didn't install about 10-12 security patches. And my printer decided not to work.

Compared to XP, Breezy is heaven for me. Once you get everything working, that is. I have had Warty and Hoary previously installed, but Breezy is simply the best.

xequence
October 22nd, 2005, 08:00 PM
8-9 ;)

Nothing bad has happened, but I expected it to be better.

sjeapes
October 22nd, 2005, 08:20 PM
I gave it a 5-6

That's possibly a little harsh but I've had problems with both my soundcard and 3D graphics both of which worked first time with no problems in Hoary.

Having said that, if these problems didn't exist and everything worked I'd have given it 8 or 9 and I really like Hoary, it's easily the best distro I've found. I think I'll switch back tomorrow and live with a slightly less bleeding edge system.

bk452
October 22nd, 2005, 09:45 PM
I've seen a lot of people complaning about Breezy. I'd like to have this feeling translated to numbers. So I've opened this thread.Please vote, and if you want, tell me why.

I had heard about the complaints and was considering staying with Hoary, but curiosity got the best of me. I am so happy about Breezy. Almost all of the problems I was having have disappeared.

The only thing that doesn't work is CdCat. And I was really hoping that Dashboard was going to be in Breezy. I'm dying to have that cool NASA widget on my desktop like the Mac Tiger OS.

poofyhairguy
October 22nd, 2005, 10:02 PM
And I was really hoping that Dashboard was going to be in Breezy. I'm dying to have that cool NASA widget on my desktop like the Mac Tiger OS.

I thought dashboard was replaced by beagle.

bk452
October 22nd, 2005, 10:16 PM
I thought dashboard was replaced by beagle.

I think Dashboard depends on Beagle.

sphinx
October 23rd, 2005, 01:28 AM
I gave it a 5-6 due mainly to an intangible feel.

My first impressions are very good, I can watch all kinds of movies in various formats. I can play 3D accelerated games. I have my full Java development software stack running, including a commercial IDE. I dont have to worry about malware, and the system workings are as transparent as I choose at any given time.

However, After a week or so of use I'm am running into some annoyances. All GUI related. I'm used to flying through the Windows GUI with key combinations and having windows snap open, scroll fast and smoothly (firefox, I'm looking at you!). But with gnome on Ubuntu, things feel sluggish and I'm struggling to find out how to get some useful key combos working. For example, how do I set up a key combination to launch firefox?

These issues are all gnome related. So I'm about to look into a lighter weight windows manager. Xfce or something.

However, I'll illistrate how good Ubuntu Breazy has been for me. I'm currently running Breazy full time on my main desktop. I didn't choose to do this initially, but I accedently wrote grub into the MBR of my windows drive. All I have to do fix it is boot with the Windows CD and repair it. Its been a week or so and I havent bothered, or had reason to. Now that, I find really impressive. :)

poofyhairguy
October 23rd, 2005, 01:41 AM
I'm used to flying through the Windows GUI with key combinations and having windows snap open, scroll fast and smoothly (firefox, I'm looking at you!). But with gnome on Ubuntu, things feel sluggish

Thats why, even though I know its a toy, I'm addicted to xcompmgr!

windows fly!

Breaks
October 23rd, 2005, 02:07 AM
I have to say im absolutely loving breezy right now.. installed like a dream, works just peachily and thus far ive had absolutely no errors nor set backs what so ever.. so far so good.

brentoboy
October 23rd, 2005, 03:17 AM
I would have voted 5 or 6 (but I actualy changed distros, so I figured I shouldnt lie - not on all my PCs, but on my primary desktop - ubuntu is a virutal macnine here now.)

I would have rated hoarty a 9 - only issues I had with it were laptop centric - and it did better than anything else I had ever seen.

Mepis was right behind it with "just works" so id have given them a 7/8.

Breezy is not up to snuff with mepis, even my desktop computer doesnt do well with breezy, so that drops it below mepis - at 5 or 6. Probably a 5 because you have to take away a point for dissapointment after being so promissing just 6 months ago.

Anyway. Thanks to vmware, I can be an ubuntu user without betting my entire PC on it.

-b

aysiu
October 23rd, 2005, 03:20 AM
It's okay. I liked Hoary a lot better when the backports had everything, the Ubuntu Guide was up-to-date, and nothing was buggy. Since Breezy's come along, it's been a major adjustment for me. It's okay. I can use it.

Psquared
October 23rd, 2005, 03:23 AM
I like it a lot more now that I got my wireless working. :D I'd give it a 9.5

william_nbg
October 25th, 2005, 08:17 PM
I've used all ms systems from dos 5 on up. I have used many Distros, e.g. Suse, Red Hat, Mepis, Mandrake, Debian, Evil Entitiy(very unusual distro), several live distos, etc ...

And I have to say Ubuntu - Hoary, Breezy (never ran Warty) is the best OS on the market. I run Ubuntu only on my primary desktop.

Thank you!!

jocke1s
October 25th, 2005, 10:50 PM
ubuntu is by far the best linux I have ever used (been thru suse, redhat,mandrake,debian,slackware, etc....)

The only problem I have now is that Its slow and slugish. Firefox is slow and just much much much worse than on XP. gnome-terminal is slow slow slow....

*sigh* I though I would just get used to it being a little slow but I feel I just get more and more irritated.

I am running 1.2 GHz AMD with 1Gb ram.

686 kernel, nvidia, hdparm, prelink etc etc. Running e17 from cvs and sometimes gnome. Its not the loading times of apps or bootup thats irritating, its the artefacts left when moving windows, its the slow closing when minimize its the sudden small lockups its knowing how smooth things was in XP.

I have read alot here about how slow XP is and how bad it is after a month etc etc How horribly slow it gets when the registry is bloated and so on...

My XP desktop response is much much better than in linux. Its smother, surfing is more responsive, menus open much much faster. Its the general feel of navigating the desktop, opening apps etc etc.

I don't really care if "linux is actually faster because blah blah blah"

The fact for me is that at least breezy is much less responsive and not as enjoyable to work in with respect to desktop responsiveness and general smoothness compared to XP.

This is actually pretty sad since I just love linux and the linux way of working. I just hate a slugish unresponsive desktop.

*sigh*

JA.

ps Apart from that Its great :)

thechitowncubs
October 25th, 2005, 11:07 PM
9-10

nothing wrong, bittorrent client could be a lot better, and i wish gnome was faster, but thats it :D

also, i wish it was easier to share files

HJThis
October 25th, 2005, 11:44 PM
Hello,To all

Well i give it a 10 on my end after trying out
Suse9 9.2Pro & now 10 i was praying i could
kill XP for good.

but after seing Ubuntu on a buds PC i had to
have it i like it way more then Suse

now is there some place to buy Ubuntu like
you can for Suse would love to help out the
support team.

again a 10 from me & a 10 plus for the forums

Thank you

thinkpadg41
October 26th, 2005, 01:20 AM
Very good! Everything worked, some problems with DVD codecs - poor documentation for Breezy, used "Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide" instead to get multimedia and DVD play working. Also, I had to install gcc-3.4 for my internal HSF modem. Now I give 9-10, but will be nice if Breezy had:

1.Detailed manual (like the Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide) - helped me a lot to fix most of the problems.

2.Better Fonts for LCD (I'm comparing with WinXP)

poofyhairguy
October 26th, 2005, 01:37 AM
1.Detailed manual (like the Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide) - helped me a lot to fix most of the problems.

Have you looked at the rather large help file included (its the button that looks like a life saver)?



2.Better Fonts for LCD (I'm comparing with WinXP)[/SIZE]

That funny, because I see people say this a lot. I guess taste in fonts REALLY varies from person to person. Some people can't stand anti-analyzed text (I can't live with out it) and some people like XP's cleartype more than Ubuntu's fonts (everytime I'm on a Windows machine I really miss my Ubuntu fonts). I guess the best thing would be to make it easy to change the font style easily.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=20976

mr.morphic
October 26th, 2005, 02:24 AM
I voted 9-10. Overall, I'm very happy with Breezy, but I still have a couple of minor issues.

I have a Dell Latitude laptop, which also runs Windows.

I previously had Hoary, which was fairly usable but there were some issues:

Power management was borked. The machine would freeze for 30 seconds every now and again. Turning off all widgets that use power management fixed it, but it's a pain not having a battery monitor on a laptop.
Sound in only one app at a time, despite playing around with Alsa/esd settings etc.
No sound in bzflag, my favourite game. I found that it worked fine using XFCE as a desktop, but in Gnome a no-show.
Skype didn't work
Menus were not configurable
Mono/monoDevelop didn't work


I did a clean install of breezy from the preview install CD, and then did an update using synaptic when breezy was finalised.

The things improvements/enhancements that I like are:

Power management is now fixed, and I can use a battery monitor
There is a clearly perceptible speed improvement across the user interface. Hoary used to be a little quicker than windows, but breezy is better still. I haven't seen this computer give such responsiveness.
Skype works
Mono and MonoDevelop work (and I've even started a project in mono)
Editable menus
The "Add Applications" program, which I think is much easier for not so technically advanced users.
The update widget in the notification panel.
extra screen savers
OpenOffice 2
Numerous improvements in individual applications.


The issues I still have are:

Sound is still a bit of a mess. I have been trying to use my computer for guitar processing, and installed creox, which uses Jack. The whole OSS/Alsa/Esd thing is not tidy. The multimedia selector is only a part of this, but changing stuff with config files, and still having to hold rabbits foot and hope it works is not the best state. I eventually gave up on the effects processing, in part because it seems problematic setting up sound, but also I think the computer is not fast enough on the few effects that actually worked, introducing a slight lag.
sound on bzflag still doesn't work on gnome. I haven't installed XFCE under breezy.
The bzflag install available thru ubuntu has a networking problem of some sort - my bullets are not seen by other players. I circumvented that however by compiling the latest source myself, because 2.0.4 is better anyway. So that's not really a problem for me any more.
blender is borked - when I right click the screen goes haywire. This seems to be a known problem between blender and x.org on an ATI card.
The VLC gui problem, which is also a known issue.


I know that some of the improvements, and most of the issues I still have, actually reside in the packages outside ubuntu's control. I would say, however, that I think the ubuntu developers generally have done a fantastic job making sure it all hangs together as well as it does, even with some of the sticky issues that exist with some packages.

Thanks
Mark

Psquared
October 26th, 2005, 02:49 AM
Now that I've got my wireless issues fixed I'd give it 9.

Still, fonts and graphics do not display as crisply as in Xpee. Power management is also troublesome for me. My battery does not last as long in Ubuntu and there is no real graphic tool for managing all of these features.

I may not have all the acpi stuff installed, but I don't know what else to install. I would love to be able to suspend to RAM and Hibernate, but I just can't figure out how to set it up.

ThirdWorld
October 26th, 2005, 02:50 AM
First I will like to say that ubuntu is by far the BEST operating system i have use.I voted 9-10. I would like to see a solution to the codecs issue provided by ubuntu or a 3rd party. There should be a legal way to get all the codecs for your operating sistem and make them work embeded in your browser like Firefox for Windows or Camino for Mac. Also, there are lots of programs that are not updated like Amarok. The Ubuntu team should work hard to create a complete media solution like ilife for linux. :razz:

AllenGG
October 26th, 2005, 05:08 AM
First I downloaded and burned an ISO, DVD 2.8G, for the AMD64 version, also a "Live cd" to boot, Ok so far, tried the "Live CD", loved it, then proceeded to "Install". Ooops!
Ended adding partitions to 2 SATA HDD's. Maybe Ok because I can now "dual-boot" 5.10 or 5.04, great for the transition. A little awkward.
On another machine a P4 with 512MB of ram, I did an "upgrade", much better idea!!!
Later I d/l'd and burned a full "Live/Install" i386 DVD, to try it, worked great ! Also tried it on my Acer Centrino notebook. Could not find the wireless.
My conclusion is that upgrading is the better route.
Overall: 5.10 is better than 5.04
Allen:smile:

Ride Jib
October 26th, 2005, 05:16 AM
I guess I had a misconception. I thought an "official release" would mean everything that worked previously will still work, plus new enhancements.

I tried upgrading my desktop via apt-get dist-upgrade, which resulted in my computer not being able to do anything. I then had to reformat and install from disk. Now, even though I have installed nvidia drivers and changed my xorg.conf file accordingly, x still cannot load. I don't mind using the terminal, but I like doing more than one thing at a time.

I had expectations of breezy to be an improvement to hoary. I'm currently using breezy on my laptop, and frankly, I don't see enough differences worth the upgrade. I'm disappointed.

Ferio
October 26th, 2005, 03:55 PM
Well, I'm very sad to say this, because I was quite happy with Hoary, but Breezy is not as good by far (I've granted it a 3-4 :(). My reasons:
- Firefox is not loading properly some sites, and the rest of the browsers are not doing any better (Epiphany, Mozilla, Galeon...); Konqueror works slightly better, but fails with some sites, too. Besides, Firefox's tabs are not working anymore.
- I can't manage to burn a single CD or DVD, not using GnomeBaker, nor Graveman, nor GCombust not K3b.
- Totem doesn't synchronize voice and video.
- Rhythmbox can't load some music files.
- Usplash is not working properly for me.
- When trying to use my webcam, the system freezes.
- I have to re-configure my network connection every time I log in.
- CD Player doesn't works, I've to play my CDs with Sound Juicer.
- OpenOffice 2 can't open some .odt files I've created with it.
- Evolution has problems when receiving some e-mails, and doesn't filter spam.

What else could I say? Hoary worked better for me than Breezy. I'm giving a try to Fedora Core 4, if I find a way to burn it in a DVD.

snowjunkie
October 26th, 2005, 04:50 PM
I haven't had any problems with Breezy. I just upgraded my wife from Hoary to Breezy last night, and she likes it just fine. Only problem with hers that I've noticed is that some GTK2 theme engines for custom themes I did are missing.

Yeah, happened me too... you just need to go back in and re-customise your theme.

Riverside
October 27th, 2005, 01:40 AM
security is still a mess (or a non-issue) in ubuntu. Ever heard of good firewallsIf you are looking for really good security and firewall protection, don't rely on any firewall configuration that someone else wrote. That applies to Firestarter, SuSE Firewall 2, et al. Take the time to learn about networking and security issues, and learn to configure your own firewall from the command line using iptables.

That said, Firestarter or SuSE Firewall 2 (for SuSE users) are fine for most users, myself included.

Footer
October 27th, 2005, 02:52 PM
Still, fonts and graphics do not display as crisply as in Xpee.

Whew! And I thought it was just me! I've tried every tip I can find in this forum for de-uglification of fonts/graphics to no avail. At least I've got Firefox working well (using Mozilla-Firefox 1.0.7 -- NOT Ubuntu's version in the apt-get repositories).

Well, maybe someday the fonts and graphics will get better?

emperor
October 27th, 2005, 03:19 PM
Setting up the sound to work properly with multimeda, games, movie trailers and etc is still a nightmere. I spent about 30 hours over 2 days getting sound working properly in all possible cases! So, I give Breezy a 9 out of 10. Hoary was about a 7.5, and Warty was a 6. So, there has been great improvement in the last year or so!

gamerchick02
October 28th, 2005, 11:34 PM
I really like it. For one, I have my brother, who is really good with computers and who helped me through the whole ordeal. It was quick to install the base packages (less than a half hour) and since I was at his apartment, which has broadband access, we got more packages rather quickly.

I am a Windows XP convert (sort of) and I really like the way I can request "safe" programs from the Ubuntu servers and get them and install them with one click. I prefer this to the whole Windows problem of finding good software to get from the net. Lots of research goes into that.

I like the way Gaim is default. Gaim is a big pain to get for Windows (I had a problem with bad downloads).

I like Gnome. I like the way it looks and how customizable it is. Windows just isn't as customizable as Linux.

Now, I have several games that don't work under Ubuntu (The Sims, SimCity 4, etc) so I have to have a Windows partition to handle those.

I don't like the fact that some stuff isn't supported (like my Winmodem). Oh well, that's life, ain't it? :)

The only other thing I don't like about Linux is that it can be intimidating for a newbie to use, but here on the forums, I haven't had any problems getting help for things that are giving me trouble.

I give it a 9. I really like Ubuntu. Matter of fact, I've gotten irritated with Windows and how it does certain things, just in the couple weeks I've been using it regularly.

I'm looking forward to the next version.

Amy

Edited for spelling... Spelling is a problem for me, I guess. :-P

TimelessRogue
October 28th, 2005, 11:59 PM
At this point, I'm extremely satisfied ... well, maybe not extremely satisfied: I'll save that for M'Lady ... but at least quite happy with Ubuntu in general and Beezy in particular. Yes, there have been a bump or two on the path to total satisfaction, but then Windoze (particularly in the early years and even later with the various "upgrades" to the point where I refused to even use XP) was no great joy either, what with having to install software and drivers to get things to work to say nothing of the concern with security and hackability.

Soooo ... my vote is 100% for Ubuntu Beezy ...

microo
October 29th, 2005, 01:35 PM
I'm not really please to have download what i've been awaiting for months. Breezy was not a breeze for me ..problem with keyboard for once and the rest that follow.

This is why i've return to Hoary. I like Ubuntu very much but the Ubuntu people will have to offer a better performance if they want to compete with Windows Vista.

I will continue to upgrade when the new Dapper Drake arrive but i hope if I encounter problems that i will be able to get back to Hoary.

Warty was good but it is Hoary that gave Ubuntu is fame. I think it is a lot of effort to launch a distro but this one was a strike for me but like a good boxer don't let your arms down continue the fight.

You have won half of the battle.

wazoo
October 31st, 2005, 09:14 PM
Warty worked for me. Hoary worked better. Breezy upgraded easily enough -- but I found that trailers wouldn't play, streamtuner wouldn't work, and freemind no longer works. I would expect a Debian based distro to upgrade easily enough -- but to break things that did work seems .... average. So that's a 5. I really am considering a switch to PCLinuxOS or Mepis, something that I know does what it's supposed to, right out of the box.

Donnut
November 1st, 2005, 01:03 AM
I love Ubuntu, Breezy especially. It took a while to get my ATI drivers installed, but I was also a noob, just-learning. Since I learned I could run WoW on Linux, I am never going back to Windows.

LorenzoD
November 1st, 2005, 01:15 AM
I liked it up to the feature freeze. Then it actually began to get a bit tiring. Thankfully the Dapper repositories are open and gnome-panels, evolution, amarok and a few other apps are making life interesting again.

Jason-X
November 1st, 2005, 06:05 PM
Breezy is great on my G4 iMac. Much better than Hoary.

It's faster and more apps seem to be available. Mplayer and Transcode now work which is a big bonus.:)

tirian
November 1st, 2005, 09:06 PM
Breezy was a really bad upgrade (I ended up wiping my root partition)

However, other than that, this is the best release so far! The suspend is much better and graphics acceleration works now.

The only problem I had was with my wireless which was fixed by building my own wireless drivers.

~Tirian

blueturtl
November 1st, 2005, 10:45 PM
I was very sad to find that Breezy didn't make the cut. After Hoary it just felt.. well a bit finicky. I'm not saying it's unstable, but there were minor flaws all around that just weren't there in Hoary. Maybe after a few months the updates will have it smoothed out, but for now - I'll be sticking with the tried and true (and yes, a tad bit dirty :D ) Hoary Hedgehog.

edit: I gave 7-8

basketcase
November 2nd, 2005, 01:33 AM
I may have voted prematurely.

initially about 2 months before the release, I had hoary sitting pretty on my notebook. I figured I'd give Breezy a whack, no dice.

I did get Breezy again once it was released, and installed it last Friday night. I'm IMPRESSED, probably more so than when I initially loaded up Hoary.

I haven't used it much, work has been keeping me busy, but one of these nights I hope to open the notebook back up and take a closer look.

So for the time being 7-8, would have been 9-10 if I had gotten my touch pad to work like it did in SUSE.

arctic
November 4th, 2005, 06:31 PM
If you are looking for really good security and firewall protection, don't rely on any firewall configuration that someone else wrote. That applies to Firestarter, SuSE Firewall 2, et al. Take the time to learn about networking and security issues, and learn to configure your own firewall from the command line using iptables.

That said, Firestarter or SuSE Firewall 2 (for SuSE users) are fine for most users, myself included.I always configure my firewalls manually but for a distro that "should" work out of the box and be something better than windows security-wise, the ubuntu approach is ... well ... asking for trouble. Firestarter is e.g. not installed by default and it would be at least a first step for "average" computer users that don't know a lot about security. IMHO, Fedora is the distro to beat in terms of security and ubuntu has a very long way to go in this area. (I trust my important stuff to fedora and slackware btw. and not to ubuntu)

Stormy Eyes
November 4th, 2005, 06:36 PM
I've seen a lot of people complaning about Breezy. I'd like to have this feeling translated to numbers. So I've opened this thread.Please vote, and if you want, tell me why.

I give Breezy a solid 8. It's solid; I had no trouble upgrading my machine and my wife's from Hoary, and it works well. I'm displeased with the continued use of ESD, but I understand the developers' reasons for keeping that brain-damaged travesty of a software mixer.

AndyCooll
November 19th, 2005, 09:31 PM
I'd give it a 7-8.

As a newbie I've tried a few distros and it's the one I like most essentially because of the "it works" factor. I can't give Breezy top marks however because wireless networking and WPA-PSK security is still too difficult to install.

:cool:

jtwadsworth
November 20th, 2005, 02:06 AM
Still unhappy since I still cannot get ATI accelerated drivers to work with Ubuntu, ATI 9800 Radeon Pro, and Dell 2100FP monitor. I have done every walkthrough I can find on these forums and it still doesn't work.

jtw

bored2k
November 20th, 2005, 02:10 AM
I give it a 9 because of its lack of graphical tools for configurating the system and because the installation process does not ask me what I want and what I don't want.

firenurse4
November 20th, 2005, 04:35 AM
The only reason I upgraded was for a more recent OOo2 that would be fully compatible the the open documents standard that I was using on my windows notebook. Otherwise I probably would have kept Horay since it was working fine. Since the upgrade from hoary borked my box I gave it a 7-8. If I hadn't been able to back up my home folder in the terminal before wiping and reinstalling, it would have scored less.;)

Gadren
November 20th, 2005, 04:53 AM
I'd probably give it an 8 or 9. With other distros, I always had the sense as if I either couldn't understand anything at all what was going on and I have to configure everything (Debian), or everything was done for me in such a way that I felt that I couldn't learn anything (MEPIS).

Hoary gave me issues with sound, but, either because of improvements in the distro, or because of my growing Linux abilities, Breezy is...well...a breeze for me, music-wise! As one who cannot concentrate for very long on a computer without music, my ability to get Internet radio working this time around was very helpful.

The great thing about Ubuntu for me is that it "just works," but not without a bit of effort on my part. This may seem contradictory, but I don't want everything given to me -- by using the terminal and having to configure a few things (but never to the point of frustration), I feel like Ubuntu is the only Linux distribution that actively teaches me about Linux while letting me do the things I want to do.

Iandefor
November 20th, 2005, 08:24 AM
I like breezy, but I've noticed that it's a little less... polished than hoary. I hope Dapper isn't to Breezy as Breezy is to Hoary...

Mozzer
November 20th, 2005, 12:45 PM
Hoary caused me a lot of gried in my early days. To that end, I decided to go for an upgrade instead of a fresh install. Alas, this caused OpenOffice and Firefox to stop functioning, the sound problem got worse and the system was never really sure whether it was hoary or breezy any more.

So I decided to take the plunge and got for a new install on a new hard drive (with the old one ready for the scrap heap anyway). Nice graphical install to give me a sense of progress instead of endless lines of meaningless text. NIce graphical boot. Just generally a few nice tweaks to make it better to look at.

Now I was prepared to do a lot of configuration but to my surprise there wasn't much necessary!

The sound - just works. One of the first things I noted at boot was that it clearly labelled my two sound cards seperately. This had caused a lot of trouble on Hoary that I never quite managed to fix. Now it works just fine.

The screen resolution - just works. On 5.04 I had to research my monitor's refresh rates and stuff (and for an obscure make that no one's ever heard of that's not easy) and then edit some code. Not this time.

The clock - just works. One of those annoying niggles I had to iron out on Hoary was that the time was an hour wrong - but not on Breezy.

Ndiswrapper - just works. Hallelujah! This was my biggest source of grief as a noob, primarily because it was not installed on my stock kernel (don't know why) and it took me ages to figure it out. This time it worked perfectly, as soon as I realised how careful you have to be with case sensitivity.

Overall, one very happy Breezy user. The only problem so far is that for some reason the only repository listed is the Breezy CD (no internet sites) but I'm sure I'll be able to fix that soon.

An excellent OS - keep up the good work!

drummer
November 20th, 2005, 12:58 PM
9-10 for me. Almost everything works as it did in Hoary, all I have to fix still is my wacom which I haven't really tried to yet, so hopefully won't be a problem. The only tricky thing to do is compile lirc against the new kernel and get the modules to play nice and insert properly. Generally just a few irks that stopped me giving it the top score. Can't wait for Dapper if it's as smooth as they say it will be :D

BoyOfDestiny
November 20th, 2005, 02:03 PM
9-10. Using the 64-bit version on my desktop, 32-bit on laptop. The only thing I had to do on both: disable ESD, choose ALSA, and install alsa-oss and the sdl libs... Multiple sounds work perfectly on the desktop (audigy2 soundcard), as for the laptop not perfect, but I rather have no lag and sound devices not "busy" either way...