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View Full Version : [all variants] I'm looking for an Adobe After Effects alternative.



diablo75
May 11th, 2008, 05:47 PM
Adobe After Effects is something I have the most experience with using when it comes to video editing. Next down from that would be simple splicing programs like avidemux in Ubuntu and Virtual Dub in Windows.

I've not recently tried to install After Effects on WINE, but I would suspect it may be a option since there's a lot of buzz going on about the ability to run Photoshop on top of it. If that's the case, then the problem is probably already solved for me. But in the mean time, I am looking for the most sophisticated video editor available for Linux, commercial or non-commercial. Avidemux is nice and quick for simple tasks, but when it comes to adding effects and working with multiple elements, it's just not sufficient.

Suggestions?

FakeOutdoorsman
May 11th, 2008, 08:26 PM
After Effects is so CPU intensive that I doubt it will work very well in Wine. I run Photoshop in VirtualBox which works well, but it will still crash once in awhile. I haven't even attempted using After Effects in VirtualBox. Adobe Creative Suite is the only reason I still have a Windows XP partition.

As for simple video editing, you can try Kino, LiVES (http://lives.sourceforge.net/index.php?do=screenshots), or the Open Movie Editor (http://www.openmovieeditor.org/).

kayosiii
May 12th, 2008, 01:02 AM
you could try Shake or Nuke or (I am sure that one of the autodesk compositors smoke or flame runs on linux)... Houdini also contains a compositor.

None of these options are cheap but are very real world tested.

If it's free options you want - Blender has a pretty cool node based compositor built in, Jahshaka is interesting but still needs a lot of work. Cinelerra can do some compositing work.
And you can do really cool compositing stuff with realtime applications like gephex and veejay.

True most of these options are node based compositors and not exactly like after-effects... But there are definitely good options available for Linux in this field.

jedimasterk
May 12th, 2008, 05:34 AM
you could try Shake or Nuke or (I am sure that one of the autodesk compositors smoke or flame runs on linux)... Houdini also contains a compositor.

None of these options are cheap but are very real world tested.

If it's free options you want - Blender has a pretty cool node based compositor built in, Jahshaka is interesting but still needs a lot of work. Cinelerra can do some compositing work.
And you can do really cool compositing stuff with realtime applications like gephex and veejay.

True most of these options are node based compositors and not exactly like after-effects... But there are definitely good options available for Linux in this field.


Yeh right!. They don't even come close to the video editing options available on a Mac or Windows XP machine. Linux sucks when it comes to video editing or professional photo editing for that matter. :lolflag:

omnidecay
May 12th, 2008, 06:06 AM
If you were able to find anything autodesk. You would have more then enough to feed your after effects needs. Research the different types though.

jedimasterk
May 13th, 2008, 03:39 PM
If you were able to find anything autodesk. You would have more then enough to feed your after effects needs. Research the different types though.

Requirements for Autodesk 3D StudioMAX

System Requirements
Software

The 32-bit version of Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2009 software is supported on any of the following operating systems:

* Microsoft® Windows Vista®
* Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional (SP2 or higher)

The 64-bit version of 3ds Max 2009 software is supported on any of the following operating systems:

* Microsoft Windows Vista
* Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64

3ds Max 2009 software requires the following browser:

* Microsoft® Internet Explorer® 6 or higher

3ds Max 2009 software requires the following supplemental software:

* DirectX® 9.0c* (required)

* Some features of 3ds Max 2009 are only enabled when used with graphics hardware that supports Shader Model 3.0 (Pixel Shader and Vertex Shader 3.0). Check with your manufacturer to determine if your hardware supports Shader Model 3.0. Learn more about graphics hardware compatibility.
Hardware

At a minimum, 3ds Max 2009 32-bit software requires a system with the following:

* Intel® Pentium® 4 or AMD Athlon® XP or higher processor
* 512 MB RAM (1 GB recommended)
* 500 MB swap space (2 GB recommended)
* Hardware-accelerated OpenGL® and Direct3D® supported
* Microsoft Windows–compliant pointing device (optimized for Microsoft® IntelliMouse®)
* DVD-ROM drive

Note: Apple® computers based on Intel processors and running Microsoft operating systems are not currently supported.

At a minimum, 3ds Max 2009 64-bit software requires a system with the following:

* Intel EM64T, AMD Athlon 64 or higher, AMD Opteron® processor
* 1 GB RAM (4 GB recommended)
* 500 MB swap space (2 GB recommended)
* Hardware-accelerated OpenGL and Direct3D supported
* Microsoft Windows–compliant pointing device (optimized IntelliMouse)
* DVD-ROM drive


<snip>

Sean4000
May 31st, 2008, 07:19 AM
Lumiera is on the horizon and Linux will have its killer NLE.

www.lumiera.org

omnidecay
February 21st, 2009, 07:49 PM
Autodesk: Inferno, smoke, flame, and flint. All do what it is you are looking for. IMO these are even better than after effects. Check one of them out.

kayosiii
February 26th, 2009, 12:01 PM
Yeh right!. They don't even come close to the video editing options available on a Mac or Windows XP machine. Linux sucks when it comes to video editing or professional photo editing for that matter. :lolflag:

Wow what's with the attitude? -- The OP was asking about compositing software... Of which there are a few options. The fact that Linux does or not have as nice Video editing / Photo editing tools as available on Mac/Windows is pretty irrelevant to what I was saying.

kayosiii
February 26th, 2009, 12:07 PM
Requirements for Autodesk 3D StudioMAX

System Requirements
Software

The 32-bit version of Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2009 software is supported on any of the following operating systems:

* Microsoft® Windows Vista®
* Microsoft® Windows® XP Professional (SP2 or higher)

The 64-bit version of 3ds Max 2009 software is supported on any of the following operating systems:

* Microsoft Windows Vista
* Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64

3ds Max 2009 software requires the following browser:

* Microsoft® Internet Explorer® 6 or higher

3ds Max 2009 software requires the following supplemental software:

* DirectX® 9.0c* (required)

* Some features of 3ds Max 2009 are only enabled when used with graphics hardware that supports Shader Model 3.0 (Pixel Shader and Vertex Shader 3.0). Check with your manufacturer to determine if your hardware supports Shader Model 3.0. Learn more about graphics hardware compatibility.
Hardware

At a minimum, 3ds Max 2009 32-bit software requires a system with the following:

* Intel® Pentium® 4 or AMD Athlon® XP or higher processor
* 512 MB RAM (1 GB recommended)
* 500 MB swap space (2 GB recommended)
* Hardware-accelerated OpenGL® and Direct3D® supported
* Microsoft Windows–compliant pointing device (optimized for Microsoft® IntelliMouse®)
* DVD-ROM drive

Note: Apple® computers based on Intel processors and running Microsoft operating systems are not currently supported.

At a minimum, 3ds Max 2009 64-bit software requires a system with the following:

* Intel EM64T, AMD Athlon 64 or higher, AMD Opteron® processor
* 1 GB RAM (4 GB recommended)
* 500 MB swap space (2 GB recommended)
* Hardware-accelerated OpenGL and Direct3D supported
* Microsoft Windows–compliant pointing device (optimized IntelliMouse)
* DVD-ROM drive


<snip>

I am getting the feeling that you don't know what the *&^*@ you are talking about... Autodesk is a large company that runs a lot of different software products... You have just listed 3DStudiomax which although very tied to the windows platform is NOT COMPOSITING SOFTWARE. Autodesk sell a large number of products many which they have acquired from third parties and some of those products do work under linux. They sell a few compositing products and I think one of those was able to run on linux boxen. I am not a great fan of this product line and would probably go towards nuke/shake as I think they would be in a comparable price bracket.

hossiam
April 28th, 2009, 02:58 AM
TOXIK is what I think they are refering too.

uuwatti
April 30th, 2009, 06:45 PM
There are a few option. High-end compositors like Fusion, Houdini, Flint, Toxik, Shake and Nuke(Nuke has a personal learning edition for free (http://www.thefoundry.co.uk/pkg_overview.aspx?ui=CBC2593A-2C9F-4EF9-84BE-C198B0171453)) and then there is Blender, which, if you have the patience to learn, can do some really good professional output. If you have some time to invest, learn Blender. Oh, and there is the old ZS4 (http://www.zs4.net/) as well, but last time I tried it, it didn't work with ubuntu that well (2 years ago, I had to go back to Windows, because of After Effects, but am starting to learn Blender now)

lukeiamyourfather
May 1st, 2009, 07:14 AM
When you say edit video is that really what you're wanting to do? After Effects is a motion graphics application that has many animation features that are not for editing video. While it can edit video its very cumbersome to do (I'm an After Effects user).

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=linux+video+editor

There are plenty of dedicated editing programs in Linux that should work just fine if all you want to do is edit video. If you want motion graphics, there's not much in the Linux world for that. Cheers!