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jxhndxe
May 7th, 2008, 01:32 AM
Hello. I've been running Ubuntu via Wubi, and I'm ready to take the plunge and properly install it on my laptop. I'm currently running Windows XP, and want to make it a dual-boot by installing Ubuntu on what was my DATA partition.

I've gone through the installation steps, but I'm afraid I'm too much of an 'Absolute Beginner' to know what to do once I reach the partitioning segment.

I know that I should be able to just merge that partition in with the other with Partition Magic, but I keep getting errors about table inconsistencies. Even so, XP runs just fine, and the second partition contains no errors.

So...the question is...how would I go about installing Ubuntu on this existing partition? I'm sure I'm not the only one who has done this, so if there are some simple instructions on the web, please point me to them.

Thanks!

tjwoosta
May 7th, 2008, 01:53 AM
its very easy

first you boot the ubuntu live cd

then you go to System-Administration-Partition Editor (this is gparted, its way better for this than partition magic)

when in gparted just delete the partition that you will be installing ubuntu to (leave it unallocated) then click apply

once the partition is deleted go back to your desktop and click the install icon

when it asks you how to install select
"Guided Install: Use largest continuous free space"

this will install ubuntu to the unallocated space


Note: if you are planning to resize or make any changes to your XP partition at all make sure you defragment a few times first
(just to get all the data to the beginning of the partition rather than all spread out)

thisiam
May 7th, 2008, 02:13 AM
i think he will have to use manual, guided will install it over the whole drive which would include windows which he wants to keep.
in manual you will have to select from the unallocated space like 10gb for ext3 and say 1024mb for swap.

edit: i guess there are 3 options for guided. that would work aswell

tjwoosta
May 7th, 2008, 02:32 AM
edit: i guess there are 3 options for guided. that would work aswell

yes there are three option for guided install, just make sure you choose the one that says
Guided Install: use largest continuous free space

not the one that says

Guided Install: use entire disk

by the way i love your avatar thisiam

jxhndxe
May 7th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Thanks, folks.

I'll give this a try. I appreciate your responses.

jxhndxe
May 7th, 2008, 09:50 PM
Ack. I should I known this already...the partition I want to install it on isn't the "largest continuous free space". I know it should be, seeing as it was my DATA partition...*shrug*

So, I don't think I can use the Guided Install, which scares me a little. :)

So, how would I go about using the manual without hurting my system?

bodhi.zazen
May 7th, 2008, 09:52 PM
If you do not understand linux partitioning I suggest you stop and do some reading.

HowTo: Partitioning Basics - Ubuntu Forums (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?&t=282018)

Then back up your data from windows XP, defragement your disk from windows.

I prefer to set up my partitions prior to running the installer. You can do this with gparted, on the Ubuntu desktop CD.

How to gparted : Gparted Documentation (http://gparted.sourceforge.net/documentation.php)

Then run the installer. At the partitioning section select manual partitioning.

Mount your windows partition at /media/windows DO NOT FORMAT IT.

Mount your root ubuntu partition at / and swap at swap. Optional mount home at /home (if you wish a /home partition). You may also want a /data partition to share with windows.

HTH

tjwoosta
May 7th, 2008, 10:08 PM
largest continual Free Space

is it not the largest unallocated space?

but yes you should definatly read up on this stuff if your confused.

bodhi.zazen
May 7th, 2008, 10:30 PM
yes and no

largest continual Free Space usually refers to free space within a partition (ie free space on a ntfs partition)

largest unallocated space usually refers to free, unpartitioned space. for example if you had a 20 Gb HD and the NTFS partition was 10 Gb, the remaining 10 Gb would then bee free, unallocated space in which you can create a 10 Gb (ext3) partition.

jxhndxe
May 9th, 2008, 02:47 AM
Mount your windows partition at /media/windows DO NOT FORMAT IT.

Mount your root ubuntu partition at / and swap at swap. Optional mount home at /home (if you wish a /home partition). You may also want a /data partition to share with windows.

I wasn't absolutely certain why I would have needed to mount my windows partition, so I went ahead with everything BUT that, and it seems that everything worked out great! I appreciate everybody's input. Thank you.

Sef
May 9th, 2008, 04:09 AM
that partition in with the other with Partition Magic

It is not advisable to use Partition Magic. It and GNU/Linux tend not to get along.