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andybob
April 22nd, 2008, 04:02 AM
Hey all:

I am thinking about installing Ubuntu on my Dell B120 Laptop. Recently Windows has had some currupt files and I have not been able to use it and I would like to give Ubuntu a try. The thing I am worried about is it will be difficult to use and run. I would like to get an external hard drive, perforate it, and run Ubuntu on one perforation and Windows on the other (I need Windows for school).

Tomorrow I am going to bacj-up all my files and re-install Windows. Once I get that all done and know my computer is stable I plan to download Ubuntu and run the Live CD from boot to see what it is like.

Anyways, I am just looking for ways to learn more about Ubuntu and how user intensive it is. Also the pros and cons would ne nice too...

Thanks,



Andybob

joshrobinson
April 22nd, 2008, 04:07 AM
Hey all:

I am thinking about installing Ubuntu on my Dell B120 Laptop. Recently Windows has had some currupt files and I have not been able to use it and I would like to give Ubuntu a try. The thing I am worried about is it will be difficult to use and run. I would like to get an external hard drive, perforate it, and run Ubuntu on one perforation and Windows on the other (I need Windows for school).

Tomorrow I am going to bacj-up all my files and re-install Windows. Once I get that all done and know my computer is stable I plan to download Ubuntu and run the Live CD from boot to see what it is like.

Anyways, I am just looking for ways to learn more about Ubuntu and how user intensive it is. Also the pros and cons would ne nice too...

Thanks,



Andybob

as for pros and cons
Pros:
its secure, stable, easy to use, fast, and virtual immune to getting a virus
spyware also isnt a problem, no need for anti virus, anti spyware
software is easy to install, same with drivers
its free of cost, and free to customize, alter, and distrubute

Cons:
it doesnt run windows software unless emulated, so not all of your standard software will run, some of the more advanced settings etc. are harder to learn, as in using the command line
although once learned, its far easier, and faster to do work on your system

NightwishFan
April 22nd, 2008, 04:07 AM
Well, the live cd should give you a good idea on how Ubuntu will run. Although it will be slower than the installed system. As for pros, try this webpage.http://www.whylinuxisbetter.net

As for cons the only I can think of is hardware incompatibility and programs you need on Windows. Using the live cd allows you to preview the former although the installed system can be tweaked to work of course. A dual boot with windows solves the latter. Please note the new version of Ubuntu is due in only a few days. Good luck. ;]

Tim Sharitt
April 22nd, 2008, 04:10 AM
Running the live cd would be a good place to start if you want to get a feel for what it's like before you really jump in. However it is worth mentioning that everything may not work from the cd especially wireless depending on what you've got, but getting every thing working once it's installed is not as painful as some make it out to be.

ace007
April 22nd, 2008, 04:14 AM
For a generic Pros/Cons:

http://packratstudios.com/index.php/2008/04/06/the-pros-and-cons-of-linux-windows-and-osx/

Pros...from myself in beginner's terms:

1.) Much more secure & stable
2.) Something like 99.9% of viruses/worms are written for Windows. Linux will be totally invulnerable to them.
3.) Less strain on hardware
4.) AMAZING Community, no joke, I began typing this response 1 min after you posted it.
5.) Open Source (everything is free and available to anyone)
6.) The idea of repositories. A whole database of programs is maintained for Ubuntu. The programs are guaranteed to not be viruses. They are updates constantly. This is an extremely efficient way to install/uninstall applications. No more surfing the web for suspicious third party programs (in most cases).

Cons...

1.) Its not what your used to
2.) Most programs are written for Windows, you will have to find an alternative. But in almost every case there is an excellent free equivalent.
3.) Minor hardware issues sometime, nothing that would disable a computer
4.) You are going to have to learn to run some simple commands at the command line. It is very basic and anyone from this forum will help you. After your install is totally up and running, you could actually go a life time without using code again. But you'll find out in the long run the simple commands will actually make life easier.

5.) Windows is designed to work out of the box for nearly every type of customer. That is why it is so popular, it is also why it is so cumbersome. If you install Windows, you spend all your setup time removing thing you don't want and reconfiguring things. Ubuntu is bare bones and requires that you install everything you want. If you are up for it, Ubuntu feel much more like your own because you can choose absolutely everything you wish to install on it.


more are coming, just let me think some more...

And check out the link to psychocat's tutorial in my signature. It is one of the easiest and most concise guides I have come across.

alpdo
April 22nd, 2008, 04:56 AM
trash windows... go for ubuntu...:lolflag:

SOULRiDER
April 22nd, 2008, 05:01 AM
Running the live cd would be a good place to start if you want to get a feel for what it's like before you really jump in. However it is worth mentioning that everything may not work from the cd especially wireless depending on what you've got, but getting every thing working once it's installed is not as painful as some make it out to be.

+1 The CD will give you an idea of what its like, but not the whole experience.

IMO if you decide to install, you have to try and force yourself not to use windows for a couple of weeks, even if you need to, that way you will force yourself to learn. Two years ago I though i was never going to use anything that wasnt windows, now im hoping i will never have to touch windows again.

kansasnoob
April 22nd, 2008, 09:21 AM
Well, with 2Gb of Ram the Live Cd gave me a pretty good idea of what I was getting into.

I first tried gOS 1.0.1 which actually impressed me but I hated the enlightenment desktop.

Then I gave Freespire a test drive, It was sort of impressive but CNR was much more restrictive than synaptic in gOS.

Next came Kubuntu. Well, the screen resolution issues just drive me nuts but I got that worked out and then found "drive and file management" confusing.

Then when I was about to throw in the towel I tried Ubuntu 7.10. Wow! I just fell in love with how easy it was to install what I needed. Yes, I do use some "non-free" stuff from the Medibuntu repository, but so what? It's a click away!

After two months of Ubuntu, including the other distros which are based on Ubuntu, I'm sold! Where do I send the check!

Out of fairness, I have three problems:

#1: I do free tax prep for the elderly and the program I was provided by the IRS required Internet Explorer. Sheesh, I wouldn't trust IE with my address!

#2: I have a bunch of photo CD's (500 GB's +) that were saved as PSF files (Photo Studio Files), that are now recognized as Post Script Font. I've found that both Irfanview and XnView will open these files, but installing XnView is a PITA and running Irfanview is little better in Wine!

#3: My old HP Scanjet 2300c! I actually know I can get it to work on Ubuntu, I believe the back-end is Sane genysis #5 or something like that, I've just never taken the time, until I can get past the photo issue it doesn't matter.

And now, after trying Ubuntu from the live Cd, you can run Ubuntu in Wubi if you'd like a longer test drive. I'm trying it right now with no negligible results. (But i've been using it for less than 24 hours) It's a wee bit slow on my puter: 1.5GB VIA 2500E w/2GB RAM.

Right now I personally love having a dual boot with XP home, and I find myself booting into XP less and less as time goes by.

3rdalbum
April 22nd, 2008, 09:50 AM
Andybob, I think you'll be fine with Ubuntu.

Setting up your Ubuntu to be able to do everything you want, can and will be different to Windows; but it's likely that your computer is well-enough supported that you won't have to do anything difficult to get your system up and running.

Once installed and set up the way you want it, everything is similar enough to Windows that you won't have any problems. One of my friends is barely computer-literate, and has adjusted to Ubuntu with no problems. (I set it up for her, and purposely chose fully-compatible hardware).

Chances are, Ubuntu will automatically set up all your hardware, and all that's left for you to do is install DVD playback, codecs, the programs you want, and tell Ubuntu which wireless network to connect to. Just remember that Linux is a vastly different operating system to Windows, and you should get through.

If you really get stuck, we're always on hand to help, and you could also take your computer to a local Linux Users Group ("LUG") for more hands-on help.

stalkingwolf
April 22nd, 2008, 12:15 PM
I have 4 people close to me that I have converted to Ubuntu.
None of them had any problem. And believe me when I say they
are about as far from "power users" as you can get. My Wifes sister can crash a windows system just turning it on. The 4th
is my niece , who graduates HS in June. She has had no problems
and has had a good time playing with the OS.

andybob
April 22nd, 2008, 07:41 PM
If I were to run the live CD would I be able to Hibernate my computer, and create a password to log back in? (That is what I like to do since I have been running Windows.

Thanks,



Andybob

alpdo
April 23rd, 2008, 01:36 AM
just like born again ... heheheh
:popcorn: