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garfonzo
April 13th, 2008, 11:48 PM
Alright, I can't decide...

I got a new Dell XPS-420 in January and it runs Vista. It runs it well, actually, because I made sure the specs were good. It has frozen twice on me. It runs very smoothly (usually) and is very pleasant to look at (eye candy is important for me). However, it eats RAM like it's going out of style. (have had the message pop up "Close programs, not enough memory" even with 2GB)

I am worried, however, that Vista is not a great platform because of security issues, support issues, and the general "Vista isn't good because of ...." issues. I don't know that I like the direction MS is going with Vista and the problems they've got. I have no ill thoughts towards MS at all. I have thought about going to Ubuntu for a LONG time but can't seem to make the switch yet. I have dual booted before and would like to in Vista, but I can't seem to shrink my partition in order to install Ubuntu. Thus, a clean install is my only option. Plus, I want to be an all-or-nothing user, not a half and half type.

What do I do with my comp?
- Watch, record TV with Windows Media Center (love it!!)
- Edit HD footage I shoot with Vegas HD pro
- Sync my iPod with my mid-size (20+ GB) music collection
- Use MS Office (love the new interface)
- surf the net

I have held off switching earlier because of my work, I needed MS Office (Access and Excel in particular and OO just wasn't sufficient). I will be setting up a Debian (or Ubuntu) server this summer for my small LAN so I'm not shy of Linux and the command line (have experience with it). I'll be migrating all computer files to the server and basically making each computer a shell which gets its files from the server, never actually storing files locally - all on the server.

Really, all I'm looking for is a really good reason why I should switch. I love the open source community, the customization, the possibility to write programs that can do common tasks, the lack of dependence on store-bought stuff, and the thought of gaining control of my computer.

Convert me!


Cheers,

Garfonzo

diablo75
April 13th, 2008, 11:50 PM
A
What do I do with my comp?
- Watch, record TV with Windows Media Center (love it!!)
- Edit HD footage I shoot with Vegas HD pro
- Sync my iPod with my mid-size (20+ GB) music collection
- Use MS Office (love the new interface)
- surf the net



1. Myth TV
2. Kino, avidemux (there are others, I'm sure)
3. Amarok
4. Open Office
5. Firefox

We got what you're looking for, indeed! :guitar:

The best way for you to start is to probably do a Dual-Boot install, so you can have both OS's on the same PC. Get familiar with Ubuntu. You can keep the dual boot setup so you have Windows just incase you have to run something Windows based and Wine or VMware server can't pull it off, or do without Windows completely by reinstalling Ubuntu using the whole hard drive.

Welcome to the club!

sekinto
April 13th, 2008, 11:55 PM
- Watch, record TV with Windows Media Center (love it!!)

Myth TV (and hopefully Elisa in the future).

- Edit HD footage I shoot with Vegas HD pro

Cinelerra (or one of the many other options) + Avidemux.

- Sync my iPod with my mid-size (20+ GB) music collection

Amarok, Rhythmbox (if it supports iPods), gtkPod, et cetera...

- Use MS Office (love the new interface)

I think it will work with under Wine, if it doesn't you can just use OpenOffice.

- surf the net

Firefox, Opera, Konqueror, Epiphany, Elinks, Lynx, et cetera...

Claus7
April 13th, 2008, 11:58 PM
Hello,

for the last two :

Use crossover office. I do not know if you are able to use ms office 2007, yet 2003 works very nice.
Surf the net with far lower risk and you have to do nothing on that. I do not understand why you mention than on the first place...


Regards!

forrestcupp
April 14th, 2008, 12:03 AM
You can easily dual boot with Vista by using the partitioner that is built into the Ubuntu installer. That is part of the installation process that happens pretty automatically. I dual boot with Vista. I couldn't use Vista's partition manager to shrink my Vista partition, but it worked just fine with the Ubuntu installer. I think the problem is that Microsoft doesn't want you to dual boot, so they're not going to make it easy on you.

penguin5
April 14th, 2008, 12:19 AM
try to dual boot as others said and then see which OS you use most often over a period of time. I personally use Ubuntu way more often than Vista. I only use vista to play games, thats it .

I think you would love ubuntu more than vista as soon as you see how much smoother everything runs.

Good luck!

garfonzo
April 14th, 2008, 12:52 AM
Hey folks,

Thanks for the quick replies. I agree with all of your posts. The only thing that was stopping me from dual booting with Vista was the fact that when I tried to shrink my partition in Vista, it would only shrink by 90 MB or something (even though there were 178 GBs available). I was concerned that if I shrunk the partition on GParted, it would mess up Vista. I read a number of reports that, after shrinking with GParted, Vista would not boot. Now, they all managed to figure out how to boot Vista again with no data loss, so it wasn't a big deal. At the time, though, I didn't have time to fool around with not having access to my files on the Vista partition.

Like I said, I agree with all of your posts, however, I haven't yet heard a really compelling reason to switch. Would you all say that, after using windows for so long, Ubuntu is really that much better? Do things seem to be smoother, easier, or what? What is it about Ubuntu that has made you all very happy campers who don't miss Windows.

I could see Ubuntu being very attractive if my machine was older, but, for now it is smokin' fast with Vista so it seems to more of a difficult decision.


Cheers!

Garfonzo

MasterJS
April 14th, 2008, 01:13 AM
I have a laptop, about 3 years old now, that used to have Windows XP and made for Windows XP. After about 30 mins or so, the fan would kick into high gear and the thing would be burning my lap even though I'd let the fan have good airflow. I installed Ubuntu onto it and all the eye- candy. I got the installation customized to how I wanted it and all the programs I needed/wanted. It takes about a day for it heat up, unlike when it had Windows. Don't know if that answers your question in relation to resources.

Linux_Man
April 14th, 2008, 01:28 AM
Reasons why Ubuntu is better:

1. Eye candy, compare Vista to Compiz and you will find that Compiz's effects look better (well most people think so) and require much less resources then Aero.
2. Security, even if you use Vista 99% of the time nearly all Windows systems get viruses/spyware of some kind even with an anti-virus and being able to boot into Ubuntu to have a decent setup may be lifesaving while you de-virus your files and it would be much quicker then reinstalling Vista. Not to mention Linux is quite secure and doesn't require all the things WIndows has to run in the background such as anti-viruses Etc.
3. Documentation, while with Vista some processes give you no clue of their use and even a quick google fails to provide info on some of them, Linux's processes are easy to see what they do after a quick search. Because in Vista a malicious process could be easily hiding as one of the many processes needed to do some things in the background.
4. Power, while in Windows, much of your resources are going to DRM/WGA/Aero/*insert any other background process* the code for Ubuntu is very open, and the system is customizable, so you can be sure that 100% of your bandwidth is really going to downloading that large file rather then a Windows update or some other process.
5. Support, while in Windows, many problems are unsolvable or require other software to patch the deficiency. In Linux most everything can be done by altering settings. Also, in my experience, the Forums here are much more quickly then Windows forums and even professional support sometimes.
6. Disaster preparedness, In Linux all you ever have to do is back up your home directory every now and then, with Windows settings are everywhere making a complete settings transfer nearly impossible save for a disk image.

garfonzo
April 14th, 2008, 01:32 AM
Reasons why Ubuntu is better:

1. Eye candy, compare Vista to Compiz and you will find that Compiz's effects look better (well most people think so) and require much less resources then Aero.
2. Security, even if you use Vista 99% of the time nearly all Windows systems get viruses/spyware of some kind even with an anti-virus and being able to boot into Ubuntu to have a decent setup may be lifesaving while you de-virus your files and it would be much quicker then reinstalling Vista. Not to mention Linux is quite secure and doesn't require all the things WIndows has to run in the background such as anti-viruses Etc.
3. Documentation, while with Vista some processes give you no clue of their use and even a quick google fails to provide info on some of them, Linux's processes are easy to see what they do after a quick search. Because in Vista a malicious process could be easily hiding as one of the many processes needed to do some things in the background.
4. Power, while in Windows, much of your resources are going to DRM/WGA/Aero/*insert any other background process* the code for Ubuntu is very open, and the system is customizable, so you can be sure that 100% of your bandwidth is really going to downloading that large file rather then a Windows update or some other process.
5. Support, while in Windows, many problems are unsolvable or require other software to patch the deficiency. In Linux most everything can be done by altering settings. Also, in my experience, the Forums here are much more quickly then Windows forums and even professional support sometimes.
6. Disaster preparedness, In Linux all you ever have to do is back up your home directory every now and then, with Windows settings are everywhere making a complete settings transfer nearly impossible save for a disk image.

hmm... those are some compelling reasons. Some of which I hadn't thought of...

Tews
April 14th, 2008, 02:07 AM
First, let me say off the bat that I was a Windows user for over 16 years. I was an official MS Beta Tester for Win 98, Whistler and Longhorn. I saw a disturbing trend in the progression of code development in that the further along Windows developed, the further away it got from doing what an operating system was supposed to do ... work reliably.

Windows has reached the Peter Principle .. it has advanced to its level of incompetence. The code at its present state is unmanageable and the only thing left is a total rewrite. Windows 7 will be built around modules .. of course you will have to pay for the additional modules but that is another story..

Now, keeping the above in mind, why would you need convincing? Why would you spend hundreds upon hundreds of dollars to keep up to date with Windows... Why would you spend maybe thousands of dollars upgrading hardware to run the latest and gretest from MS??

Food for thought!

sekinto
April 14th, 2008, 02:13 AM
1: Problems are fixable.

Okay, lets say you get a virus while using Vista, the virus does a lot of damage to your system. You are encountering many problems. You don't know what to do because the virus messed with many registry settings and important system files and everything is beyond repair. A fresh install is necessary.

YOU missconfigured your xorg.conf file in Linux and are no longer able to get a GUI because x won't start, you reconfigure your xorg.conf file and everything is working again. You are happy that everything works just like it did before you encountered a problem, and now you have obtained further information on how your system works.

Usually problems are easier to fix when you are using Linux, and usually problems are caused directly by the user and have nothing to do with the OS itself. Once you fix a problem in Linux you actually learn something. And since Linux doesn't use a cryptic registry to store settings like Vista, if you HAVE to do a fresh install you can easily back up all your program settings!
2: Well, its open.

Is there a problem in the code? I know what I'll do, I'll send Microsoft an e-mail and maybe they will fix it in a month or two, in that time I'll just relax and let my computer act buggy! Unlike Windows, Linux is open source, anyone can look at the source code and find issues. If there is a problem you can report the bug and there are more than just a few people who can examine the code, you could even try to come up with a fix if you wanted to. You can also change the code and redistribute it freely.
3: Its free.

Free OS, free software, free updates, free help (in the forums).
4: Better help.

You encounter a problem in Windows, what do you do? Probably e-mail your computer manufacture for support, they probably take a day or two to respond and you have to spend a week of e-mailing just to troubleshoot the issue and it may not even be fixed. You can get free support forever in the Ubuntu forums, these people use the operating system and know things about it, they have troubleshooted similar problems and maybe encountered them their selves, they usually respond in less than in hour and can usually troubleshoot your issue quite fast. Plus they are helping you out of the kindness of their heart, not because they are earning cash to. You can even help others if you want!
5: You learn.

Its true that you can use Windows and be a "power user", but if you use Linux you tend to learn quite a bit about your operating system, especially if you use one of the less-hold-your-hand distros like Gentoo.
6: Updates.

Updates are frequent, bugs are fixed fast, security holes are usually patched before they can be exploited (since it is open the good people look for exploits). Plus you rarely ever have to restart. You only really have to restart to see the effect of the update if your kernel got updated or some drivers, if x got changed or you added a new desktop environment you probably only need to restart x, if a program got updated you shouldn't even need to restart. And with Ubuntu EVERYTHING is updated, you programs to, not just the OS like in Windows.
7: Software.

A database of software that can be installed with a few clicks of the mouse, updated automatically for you, and easily uninstalled or reconfigured. And it is all free!
8: Drivers.

Linux runs on more computer than Windows could ever hope to. Linux has more hardware support and when you use Linux it is usually Linux supporting the hardware and not the hardware supporting Linux (it is usually the second way with Windows, companies make their own drivers and you have to go online or pop in a CD just to install them).
9: Multimedia:

I probably couldn't have said this a few years ago, but the amount of and the quality of multimedia programs in Linux is amazing. You can edit multimedia, view it, use it, do anything with it you want. Linux can turn a lame computer into a media center!
10: Eye-Candy:

Other OSs are always bragging about pretty features that Linux has had for a long time (see OS X and virtual desktops). Linux has a multitude of Desktop Environments and Window Managers that can be installed. You can customize its look just how you want it. There are docks and widgets available, and tons of effects.
11: Security:

People say Linux isn't a target for malware producers, that isn't because nobody uses it, actually tons of servers use it which are huge targets for people looking to take control or do malicious things to computers. The fact is that it is hard to write malware for Linux since most exploits are taken care of before they can be exploited and it is open source so anything an evil person can find a dozen good people can find as well.
12: Speed:

Linux is quite fast, you can even get distributions that run great on ancient hardware, and you can have desktop effects better than Vista's while using less RAM.
13: Configuration:

Configuration isn't a pain like it is in Windows. No hunting down registry values to do obscure things.
14: The REAL reason we use Linux! (http://blog.anamazingmind.com/2008/03/real-reason-we-use-linux.html)

garfonzo
April 14th, 2008, 02:31 AM
Windows has reached the Peter Principle .. it has advanced to its level of incompetence. The code at its present state is unmanageable and the only thing left is a total rewrite. Windows 7 will be built around modules .. of course you will have to pay for the additional modules but that is another story..

That is totally what I feel is the problem. I have heard that Win7 will be some module system. That doesn't sound too appealing to me. I would not have upgraded to Vista except that it was a work thing.


YOU missconfigured your xorg.conf file in Linux and are no longer able to get a GUI because x won't start, you reconfigure your xorg.conf file and everything is working again. You are happy that everything works just like it did before you encountered a problem, and now you have obtained further information on how your system works.

It's funny you mention that problem, because that is exactly what happened to me when I installed Ubuntu onto my old laptop with an nVideo card. I messed up the xorg file trying to get a new driver working. Definately learned something that day.


With all of what you folks are saying, it is helping me think that Ubuntu (well, linux in general) might be the better way to go. I can only see Windows becoming less appealing. WinXP was good, Vista is pretty (sorta) but not as good (IMO) as WinXP.



14: The REAL reason we use Linux!
That's a good article. I had come across it in my search for the reason to switch.


Thanks for your thoughts! If you have more, keep them coming! I think this is a good thread for others who may also be on the fence.


Cheers!

sekinto
April 14th, 2008, 02:37 AM
Yeah, Ubuntu kind of uses a modular system to. You can add/remove different programs and other things. The difference is that if Win7 uses a modular system the "modules" are going to cost monies. When you use Linux you BUY them for FREE (lol).

I jumped off that fence and went running away from it a few years ago, haven't even considered looking back. Every time I get on a Windows machine now I just feel.....restricted or uncomfortable might be good words to describe it.

I'm not a fanboy or anything, I just don't see any reason for ME to use Windows, Windows is a good OS, it is just that Linux does everything better for ME than Windows for FREE.

Edit:
It might be a different story if I worked for a business that "needed" Windows or was a gamer who needed all the latest commercial games.

diablo75
April 14th, 2008, 03:29 AM
Hey folks,

Thanks for the quick replies. I agree with all of your posts. The only thing that was stopping me from dual booting with Vista was the fact that when I tried to shrink my partition in Vista, it would only shrink by 90 MB or something (even though there were 178 GBs available). I was concerned that if I shrunk the partition on GParted, it would mess up Vista. I read a number of reports that, after shrinking with GParted, Vista would not boot. Now, they all managed to figure out how to boot Vista again with no data loss, so it wasn't a big deal. At the time, though, I didn't have time to fool around with not having access to my files on the Vista partition.

Like I said, I agree with all of your posts, however, I haven't yet heard a really compelling reason to switch. Would you all say that, after using windows for so long, Ubuntu is really that much better? Do things seem to be smoother, easier, or what? What is it about Ubuntu that has made you all very happy campers who don't miss Windows.

I could see Ubuntu being very attractive if my machine was older, but, for now it is smokin' fast with Vista so it seems to more of a difficult decision.


Cheers!

Garfonzo

First, using a Gparted CD is actually a bit more reliable than the partitioner included on the Live CD. So you should give it a shot...

And yes. Things are smoother/easier in Ubuntu than they are in Windows. (For the record, I started with Windows 3.1 over 10 years ago, moving up to XP, then tried visit while in a networking course and found it to be very disappointing, considering we had upgraded all the computers in the lab for it, and it was still half the speed that XP was).

Installing most software in Ubuntu easy, quick, no need to look around for some stupid serial number you forgot to write down or whatever...

No threat of viruses. Far less a threat of being hacked when compared to Windows. More stable. And it's FREE! Forever! Can't beat that, I think.

forrestcupp
April 14th, 2008, 01:56 PM
Hey folks,
I read a number of reports that, after shrinking with GParted, Vista would not boot. Now, they all managed to figure out how to boot Vista again with no data loss, so it wasn't a big deal. At the time, though, I didn't have time to fool around with not having access to my files on the Vista partition.There have also been many people including myself who have dual booted with Vista with absolutely no trouble. Even if it messes up to where you can't boot Vista, you can still access your files. Ubuntu comes default with NTFS read/write support and it should automatically mount your Vista drive to access your files. Mine does.


Like I said, I agree with all of your posts, however, I haven't yet heard a really compelling reason to switch.
If we have to work that hard to compel you to switch, then you really should just stick with Vista. Linux isn't for everyone.

garfonzo
April 14th, 2008, 03:55 PM
If we have to work that hard to compel you to switch, then you really should just stick with Vista. Linux isn't for everyone.

Possibly a good point, but I think that I will be switching my desktop to Ubuntu over the summer. First, though, I'll be setting up Ubuntu server for my home LAN. That'll be fun!

xjb2003x
April 14th, 2008, 04:00 PM
If you are doing video editing, sound editing and other things like that, I would look into installing Ubuntu Studio. It has all the programs that will do the things you are looking to do already installed. I have Ubuntu Studio installed on my laptop (Dell E1505) and it runs great.

Tews
April 14th, 2008, 04:29 PM
After reading and responding to this thread my attitude is now do what ever you want .... I could now care less ..

Kinst
April 14th, 2008, 04:56 PM
You don't have to sacrifice anything. I can show you exactly how to run MS office 2003 and 2007 in wine. Access won't work (what's access even for anyways), but Word/Powerpoint/Excel/Onenote(and probably Publisher) work great. It's not even very difficult.

garfonzo
April 14th, 2008, 06:55 PM
After reading and responding to this thread my attitude is now do what ever you want .... I could now care less ..

LOL

Well, it has been quite valuable to me. I just like to hear what reasons others have for switching to Ubuntu. I wanted to see if there was one really good reason that was underlying all responses.

The fact is, I would argue that, indeed, do whatever you want. However, there are Pros and Cons to all OSs. Vista, OSX, Debian, OpenSUSE, etc. Really, it depends on what the user wants to achieve on a daily basis and how hands-on they want to be.

I think that after having started this thread and reading all the responses, I think I will switch. As I mentioned before, I'll be moving to Ubuntu over the summer. Who knows, maybe I'll switch back. But, I'll give it a good long run (all summer) before I decide to switch back.


Cheers!

Garfonzo

Murrquan
April 17th, 2008, 06:50 AM
You don't have to sacrifice anything. I can show you exactly how to run MS office 2003 and 2007 in wine. Access won't work (what's access even for anyways), but Word/Powerpoint/Excel/Onenote(and probably Publisher) work great. It's not even very difficult.

I don't actually think Onenote works under Wine ... it's not listed for Crossover Office compatibility, and the results at appdb.winehq.org say it's just garbage when they try to run it. I find this disappointing, as I'd been thinking of buying Onenote >.<

Kinst
April 19th, 2008, 08:26 PM
I don't actually think Onenote works under Wine ... it's not listed for Crossover Office compatibility, and the results at appdb.winehq.org say it's just garbage when they try to run it. I find this disappointing, as I'd been thinking of buying Onenote >.<
Does too. I'm running it right now. Everything in Onenote 2007 works except the ink tool (it complains about ole dlls). I'm personally obsessed with OneNote; I take all my uni notes in it. I'm still working on the ink tool, but in the meantime you can use Onenote to view all your notes and to take typed notes.

Heres' the thread I made for my progress: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=744743&highlight=onenote

NightwishFan
April 19th, 2008, 08:29 PM
http://www.whylinuxisbetter.net/

IHATEDLINK
April 20th, 2008, 04:01 AM
I don't really think you should switch.
I mean, you are SO windows :P
The alternatives to the windows apps you listed aren't that good.
I mean
If you are used to Media Center forget it.
The iPod thingy... Amarok or Rythimbox don't even come close to iTunes. i would pay for a fully featured version of itunes on ubuntu.
If you love MS Office, switching to OO is gonna be hard. You can always use paid software like crossover. (PAIN)

You are to used to Windows and you are happy with it, why bother? It works fine anyway.
If you realy want to try it you can always dual-boot or portion your disk...

There are some positive stuff about switching to ubuntu to:
-NO MORE VIRUS!
-It's very flexible and maintained by a very large community that can and will help you.
-It's free and legal. (First time of my life I'm doing the legal thing and it feels great)
- It's low on resources and offers you a wide range of free software
-It's easy and intuitive
BUT
-Nothing JUST WORKS like a lot of stuff on windows, you will often be bothered by silly stuff. Even playing an MP3 for the first time is hard on Ubuntu.
-You WILL have issues with something
-You will have to learn to forget about you're beloved old apps and learn to use new ones that aren't always better.( WHY ITUNES; WHY!!!??)
-SOME of your hardware will not be compatible at first.

Ubuntu(and other Linux distros) are GREAT, but not for everyone.

fluteflute
April 20th, 2008, 08:17 AM
If you are concerned about dual booting you can try Wubi (which is included in Ubuntu 8.04 out next Thursday). This lets you install Ubuntu with little risk to Windows.

Riffer
April 20th, 2008, 08:27 AM
Just for interest sake because I don't know. What does MSOffice have that Open Office doesn't? Its one of the things that my GF says why she won't switch.

SomeGuyDude
April 20th, 2008, 08:40 AM
Just for interest sake because I don't know. What does MSOffice have that Open Office doesn't? Its one of the things that my GF says why she won't switch.

Office 2007, particularly Word 2007, is an absolute joy to use. The best document editor I have ever worked with and I've tried 'em all. It's a gorgeous piece of software. Feature-wise, nothing is much different, but the interface, once you get adjusted to the fact that it's VERY different, is just such an improvement.

The inability to use Word 2007 is the ONLY sore point in my Linux conversion.

Riffer
April 20th, 2008, 08:54 AM
Office 2007, particularly Word 2007, is an absolute joy to use. The best document editor I have ever worked with and I've tried 'em all. It's a gorgeous piece of software. Feature-wise, nothing is much different, but the interface, once you get adjusted to the fact that it's VERY different, is just such an improvement.

The inability to use Word 2007 is the ONLY sore point in my Linux conversion.

Mine was Paint Shop Pro the only program I miss when I converted over so I can understand what you're saying.

I will say though I went through a period (as many do) where I was comparing linux apps to window apps and finding them lacking. But as I went further along and got into the "Linux" way of doing things I found that I have changed my mind completely. What I thought were features were really just bloat and layers that interfered with what I was doing.

Frak
April 20th, 2008, 09:04 AM
You can easily dual boot with Vista by using the partitioner that is built into the Ubuntu installer. That is part of the installation process that happens pretty automatically. I dual boot with Vista. I couldn't use Vista's partition manager to shrink my Vista partition, but it worked just fine with the Ubuntu installer. I think the problem is that Microsoft doesn't want you to dual boot, so they're not going to make it easy on you.
Ubuntu still cannot partition the newest NTFS used by Vista. Though Vista does have one built in that does it just fine.

3rdalbum
April 20th, 2008, 10:05 AM
Ubuntu still cannot partition the newest NTFS used by Vista. Though Vista does have one built in that does it just fine.

I've used Ubiquity to resize a Windows Vista partition. Are you talking about something else?

karellen
April 20th, 2008, 10:35 AM
I don't really think you should switch.
I mean, you are SO windows :P
The alternatives to the windows apps you listed aren't that good.
I mean
If you are used to Media Center forget it.
The iPod thingy... Amarok or Rythimbox don't even come close to iTunes. i would pay for a fully featured version of itunes on ubuntu.
If you love MS Office, switching to OO is gonna be hard. You can always use paid software like crossover. (PAIN)

You are to used to Windows and you are happy with it, why bother? It works fine anyway.
If you realy want to try it you can always dual-boot or portion your disk...

There are some positive stuff about switching to ubuntu to:
-NO MORE VIRUS!
-It's very flexible and maintained by a very large community that can and will help you.
-It's free and legal. (First time of my life I'm doing the legal thing and it feels great)
- It's low on resources and offers you a wide range of free software
-It's easy and intuitive
BUT
-Nothing JUST WORKS like a lot of stuff on windows, you will often be bothered by silly stuff. Even playing an MP3 for the first time is hard on Ubuntu.
-You WILL have issues with something
-You will have to learn to forget about you're beloved old apps and learn to use new ones that aren't always better.( WHY ITUNES; WHY!!!??)
-SOME of your hardware will not be compatible at first.

Ubuntu(and other Linux distros) are GREAT, but not for everyone.

I subscribe to this

drascus
April 20th, 2008, 01:03 PM
here this should be enough to convince you http://http://badvista.fsf.org/

There is no such thing as a computer that runs vista well. Just like there is no such thing as a moral Government which enslaves its people.

Kinst
April 20th, 2008, 03:49 PM
The inability to use Word 2007 is the ONLY sore point in my Linux conversion.

Word 2007 works in wine now.

garfonzo
April 20th, 2008, 05:35 PM
here this should be enough to convince you http://http://badvista.fsf.org/


That link goes nowhere



Though Vista does have one built in that does it just fine.

That's true. However, in certain circumstances, Vista writes some data to the very end of the disk making it impossible to shrink your partition. I had a 320GB hard drive which had 200GB free, but I could only shrink it 90MB. Yes, MB, not GB. No, I'm not looking for a howto on shrinking in Vista and I know why I can't shrink it. I'm just saying.



Word 2007 works in wine now.

Seriously?!

I'm off to wine AppDB to find out.


Cheers

Frak
April 20th, 2008, 05:40 PM
Word 2007 works in wine now.
There are still some bugs here and there though. I can't close without it telling me it crashed.

garfonzo
April 20th, 2008, 07:35 PM
The real item I would want to use is MS Excel. I have a decent amount of training in Excel and it is difficult for me to use the OpenOffice equivalent. I know that OpenOffice probably has all the same functionality, but for spreadsheet work, it is difficult for me to switch.

As far as word processors, I quite like AbiWord. MS Word is good (the UI is beautiful) but it is, in my opinion, easily replaceable.

chris4585
April 20th, 2008, 08:45 PM
Hey folks,

Thanks for the quick replies. I agree with all of your posts. The only thing that was stopping me from dual booting with Vista was the fact that when I tried to shrink my partition in Vista, it would only shrink by 90 MB or something (even though there were 178 GBs available). I was concerned that if I shrunk the partition on GParted, it would mess up Vista. I read a number of reports that, after shrinking with GParted, Vista would not boot. Now, they all managed to figure out how to boot Vista again with no data loss, so it wasn't a big deal. At the time, though, I didn't have time to fool around with not having access to my files on the Vista partition.

Like I said, I agree with all of your posts, however, I haven't yet heard a really compelling reason to switch. Would you all say that, after using windows for so long, Ubuntu is really that much better? Do things seem to be smoother, easier, or what? What is it about Ubuntu that has made you all very happy campers who don't miss Windows.

I could see Ubuntu being very attractive if my machine was older, but, for now it is smokin' fast with Vista so it seems to more of a difficult decision.


Cheers!

Garfonzo

you want to know the speed difference? if not i'm going to tell you anyway, OK before i had vista on my desktop with 2gb of ram right? while playing civilizations 4 (very addictive game btw) vista ate up about 80 - 90% of the ram, which made things very slow...

Now on the same machine half a year later running civilizations 4 under wine (not advised since some things dont show up, but the game was very very playable) ubuntu used about 30 - 40% of ram..

I've had about 50+ applications open before under ubuntu, and the ram % only raised up by 15% impressed yet?

think about that

Plus you can control every aspect of your computer, I warn you though, a linux desktop is only as good as the user is familiar with the OS

It took me a while to get the hang of ubuntu, but I'm glad i did, you'll be happy if you switch

Also i almost left out the Microsoft Office thing, if you run virtualbox and install xp/vista inside virtualbox you can install Microsoft Office on it, very easy to do, well as long as you have a way to install it.. but hey, money is worth spent, especially when there is a alternative just like it, and is free (Open Office) ;)

I hope i converted you!

Saint Angeles
April 20th, 2008, 08:50 PM
I don't really think you should switch.
I mean, you are SO windows :P
The alternatives to the windows apps you listed aren't that good.
I mean
If you are used to Media Center forget it.
The iPod thingy... Amarok or Rythimbox don't even come close to iTunes. i would pay for a fully featured version of itunes on ubuntu.
If you love MS Office, switching to OO is gonna be hard. You can always use paid software like crossover. (PAIN)

You are to used to Windows and you are happy with it, why bother? It works fine anyway.
If you realy want to try it you can always dual-boot or portion your disk...

There are some positive stuff about switching to ubuntu to:
-NO MORE VIRUS!
-It's very flexible and maintained by a very large community that can and will help you.
-It's free and legal. (First time of my life I'm doing the legal thing and it feels great)
- It's low on resources and offers you a wide range of free software
-It's easy and intuitive
BUT
-Nothing JUST WORKS like a lot of stuff on windows, you will often be bothered by silly stuff. Even playing an MP3 for the first time is hard on Ubuntu.
-You WILL have issues with something
-You will have to learn to forget about you're beloved old apps and learn to use new ones that aren't always better.( WHY ITUNES; WHY!!!??)
-SOME of your hardware will not be compatible at first.

Ubuntu(and other Linux distros) are GREAT, but not for everyone.
nothing JUST WORKS? have you ever installed windows on a computer? tell me what works out of the box...

almost nothing.

ubuntu picks up wireless cards video cards, even my usb sound with no problems.

please keep your lies to yourself. i've installed ubuntu on nearly a dozen peoples' computers since last october with no complaints... only extreme thanks.

PS... how hard is it to type: "sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras"



PSS to the OP, have you seen compiz in action? i'll attatch some screenshots of what you can do in linux.

chris4585
April 20th, 2008, 08:52 PM
nothing JUST WORKS? have you ever installed windows on a computer? tell me what works out of the box...

almost nothing.

ubuntu picks up wireless cards video cards, even my usb sound with no problems.

please keep your lies to yourself. i've installed ubuntu on nearly a dozen peoples' computers since last october with no complaints... only extreme thanks.

PS... how hard is it to type: "sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras"

usb sound works out of the box on ubuntu? ah man i should of bought that usb speaker for my laptop last night :/

also +1 for ubuntu-restricted-extras

that is a awesome package....

original_jamingrit
April 20th, 2008, 08:54 PM
ffmpeg -i garfonzo.windowsuser garfonzo.linuxuser

there, converted you. Oh wait, ffmpeg doesn't have stable support for brain formats yet, does it?

Hey, if you have a high-end computer, definitely at least give Sabayon Linux (http://www.sabayonlinux.org/) a try.

garfonzo
April 20th, 2008, 09:22 PM
ffmpeg -i garfonzo.windowsuser garfonzo.linuxuser


Well played.



you want to know the speed difference? if not i'm going to tell you anyway, OK before i had vista on my desktop with 2gb of ram right? while playing civilizations 4 (very addictive game btw) vista ate up about 80 - 90% of the ram, which made things very slow...

Now on the same machine half a year later running civilizations 4 under wine (not advised since some things dont show up, but the game was very very playable) ubuntu used about 30 - 40% of ram..

I've had about 50+ applications open before under ubuntu, and the ram % only raised up by 15% impressed yet?

think about that


That is my biggest gripes. I will have the following open:
- PhotShop
- Firefox
- Word
- Media Center

and then I start getting the "Running Out of RAM" message pop up and telling me to close apps. I check the task manager and it is using 1.75 GB of RAM. That's pretty crappy.

popch
April 20th, 2008, 09:28 PM
If by now you are not convinced, you are not convertible.

chris4585
April 20th, 2008, 09:37 PM
That is my biggest gripes. I will have the following open:
- PhotShop
- Firefox
- Word
- Media Center

and then I start getting the "Running Out of RAM" message pop up and telling me to close apps. I check the task manager and it is using 1.75 GB of RAM. That's pretty crappy.

You wouldn't that problem with Ubuntu+virtualbox with xp installed as guest

I'd see Photoshop as the only thing you really need and maybe excel, for windows

Just set virtualbox to give xp about 256mbs of ram, and photoshop will work fine, ubuntu will run at about 40% of ram with other apps going here (http://youtube.com/watch?v=ch8X86R6d-g) is a good video showing you have to setup virtualbox and shows you have it works a little. here's (http://youtube.com/watch?v=8yLE6yVvQsM) another video showing virtualbox in action

Really man, that's the answer to your problems..

garfonzo
April 20th, 2008, 10:30 PM
If by now you are not convinced, you are not convertible.

I will be converting in the next few weeks. I've been playing with Songbird (http://www.songbirdnest.com/) as an alternative to iTunes. It seems very promising. I plugged into my iPod and it popped up in the SongBird window just like it should. Now, the iPod plugin still needs work, but I'm excited to see a great alternative making its way into a very usable product.


I'd see Photoshop as the only thing you really need and maybe excel, for windows

I'm fully planning on learning the GIMP. I don't use PhotoShop in any way other than for sporadic hobby purposes. I've seen the new UI for the GIMP which looks like a good improvement over the previous style.

I'm also moving my server which currently runs WinXP (just a file/print server for my home LAN) to Ubuntu Server. That will allow for far better security and way more options. I want to have access to my files at work, and I'd like to stream my music to anywhere through a webpage so I can listen to my music wherever I am.

chris4585
April 20th, 2008, 10:32 PM
I will be converting in the next few weeks. I've been playing with Songbird (http://www.songbirdnest.com/) as an alternative to iTunes. It seems very promising. I plugged into my iPod and it popped up in the SongBird window just like it should. Now, the iPod plugin still needs work, but I'm excited to see a great alternative making its way into a very usable product.



I'm fully planning on learning the GIMP. I don't use PhotoShop in any way other than for sporadic hobby purposes. I've seen the new UI for the GIMP which looks like a good improvement over the previous style.

I'm also moving my server which currently runs WinXP (just a file/print server for my home LAN) to Ubuntu Server.

good to hear!