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ibuclaw
April 13th, 2008, 08:18 PM
Okay, I've edited this to stop some confusion on what I'm trying to portray across, as I admit, I was a bit vague to begin with.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _____________

Did you first think that Linux was Windows(-like) when you first made the leap into the light?

This is nothing to be ashamed about.

Infact, it is the most common problem that you'll find with new users switching (http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm).

Hell! Even I had myself convinced that Linux was Windows when I first switched!

BUT!

200 Re-Formats,
150 Re-Installations,
15 Distros,
1 Help Thread later...

And I think I finally got the picture; and it suddenly everything made sense to me.

But that aside.

Everyone has had a transitional period with Linux, and everyone has a slightly different way reacting.
Some of us go into Linux because peers recommended it. And they've loved it since!
While others got overwhelmed and ran straight back to proprietary border where they made camp and waited for the right time to switch.
Be it because your favourite app didn't work through WINE, or hardware problems stopped you in your tracks.

Some of us on the other hand go into Linux with the right experience. Be it they learnt how to use it as school or college. Or they tried it out extensively using some of the brilliant virtualisation/testing products that we have today. (Qemu, VirtualBox, VMWare, Wubi, LiveCDs, Co-Linux, etc)

While others woke up one day and had an epiphany. Erased their entire hard-drive to install a random Linux Distribution (Debian) or a Distribution that looked like Windows (Linux XP) and found themselves in a 6 foot hole of utter sadness to discover the truth. (The truth of just how different it really is.)

So how did you find your way to the light?

Regards
Iain

wouldya
April 13th, 2008, 08:21 PM
I didnt get it, what do you mean? I know linux is a little more different and difficult than windows and its not the same working on windows an working on linux. I think I would learn it as soon as I start to use it more.

cOzAtS
April 13th, 2008, 08:35 PM
Well, the first time i installed linux was mandrake 9 from a magazine trying to explain linux but all it did was keep repeating that it was just like windows an all you had to do was this and that...well at that time (2003-4) it wasn't anything like that. I couldn't even get the screen resolution right. Anyway I installed ubuntu 3 weeks before...and it was all that i expected it to be. a fully functional-easy to use-powerfull operating system yet understandable. Oh, and with great commuity support. I think it has to do with the fact that i worked with a mac and i have a fast internet line nowdays apart from ubuntu being just an amazing operating system...:D


SO my answer goes to option #2

ibuclaw
April 13th, 2008, 08:47 PM
Well, the first time i installed linux was mandrake 9 from a magazine trying to explain linux but all it did was keep repeating that it was just like windows an all you had to do was this and that...well at that time (2003-4) it wasn't anything like that. I couldn't even get the screen resolution right. Anyway I installed ubuntu 3 weeks before...and it was all that i expected it to be. a fully functional-easy to use-powerfull operating system yet understandable. Oh, and with great commuity support. I think it has to do with the fact that i worked with a mac and i have a fast internet line nowdays apart from ubuntu being just an amazing operating system...:D


SO my answer goes to option #2

Also to note, that people have different uses for their Desktops. And this makes it difficult for people with higher-end computing needs.

For example. I am a studio engineer/recordist. I, at the time was used to great apps such as Adobe Audition and Cakewalk Sonar.
In Linux, there was really nothing unless you had the right hardware (M-Audio was the only supported soundcard).

Two years later, the studio scene has really kicked off (Thanks to great distro's such as "64 Studio".)
Unfortunately, the only thing holding me back is that I'm still waiting for my Toneport box to be supported! :lolflag:

lyceum
April 13th, 2008, 09:22 PM
You would have to add mine to the poll. I expected it to be different, but I expected it to suck. I was shocked when it didn't. I've been using Ubuntu as my main OS for 2 years now, since the last long term support.

:guitar:

ibuclaw
April 13th, 2008, 09:41 PM
You would have to add mine to the poll. I expected it to be different, but I expected it to suck. I was shocked when it didn't. I've been using Ubuntu as my main OS for 2 years now, since the last long term support.

:guitar:

Yeah, perhaps I should've phrased option 2 in a non-negative way so, people voting for it have neither assumption whether or not they liked it.


"I was expecting it to be different. But found that it very different from what I was expecting!"

Alas, I can't change the poll now...

will1911a1
April 13th, 2008, 10:08 PM
While I may not have realized what I was getting into the first time I used Linux (Some distro of Redhat that I tried years ago) I knew it would be pretty different.

HotShotDJ
April 13th, 2008, 10:18 PM
Why would anybody think that Linux was Windows? That doesn't even make sense.

A better question (and perhaps what you actually meant by the question, but I won't presume to know your mind):

"Did you first think that Linux was a free clone of Windows rather than a robust, independently developed, professional, multipurpose operating system that you will need to learn how to use, just like you had to do when you first started using Windows."

Blue Heron
April 13th, 2008, 10:26 PM
Infact, it is the most common problem that you'll find with new users switching.

:confused: do you have seen DOS ?

When you want a OS that feels different try FreeDOS, good luck

FuturePilot
April 13th, 2008, 10:27 PM
The reason I was curious about Linux and tried Linux was because it was not Windows. I knew it was going to be different and I didn't expect it to be like Windows. I kept my mind open and I knew what I was getting into. What I didn't know was that I would be using Linux 99.99% of the time 2 years later. :D

ibuclaw
April 13th, 2008, 10:36 PM
Why would anybody think that Linux was Windows? That doesn't even make sense.

A better question (and perhaps what you actually meant by the question, but I won't presume to know your mind):

"Did you first think that Linux was a free clone of Windows rather than a robust, independently developed, professional, multipurpose operating system that you will need to learn how to use, just like you had to do when you first started using Windows."

I'll make a change to my first post.

The general idea I'm getting on at is the first month using Linux where you are generally lost at every corner you turn to in it!

Why don't my favourite apps work?
Where can I find an alternate?
Why has GIMP got so many [insert appropriate word here] window panes? I can't use it, let alone get round in it!

This is asking about general difficulties that we all face when starting Linux. And how much we accept it all boils down to how much we are prepared to expect that it won't be another Windows machine.
While at the same time turning it into a bit of an experience talk.

Just thought that I might have a topical discussion on the subject.
__________________________________________________ _________________________________________
The internet is a brilliant invention - it enables you to be insulted by people you've never met, from all over the world!

Saint Angeles
April 13th, 2008, 10:41 PM
im not sure i really understand the question.

if linux was windows, it would be called windows and it would be made by microsoft

Chame_Wizard
April 13th, 2008, 10:43 PM
I knew all long that Linux is different than Windows

ibuclaw
April 13th, 2008, 11:05 PM
Ok, I updated my first post. Should eliminate 75% of the confusion that most of you gave!

Regards
Iain

cardinals_fan
April 13th, 2008, 11:23 PM
The only time I was lost/confused when I started using Linux was when I was getting my [insert favorite expletive here] wireless adapter to work.

ibuclaw
April 13th, 2008, 11:41 PM
The only time I was lost/confused when I started using Linux was when I was getting my [insert favorite expletive here] wireless adapter to work.

Yeah, I had that too. But then I discovered ndiswrapper.
:popcorn:

Although their intent is good, it is just one of many "dirty" projects that exploit Windows and use that technology to benefit Linux and those switching.

I remember having a discussion about this with my peer group. And we all generally agreed that as more developers build these cross-compatibility modules (WINE, Mac-on-Linux, Linux Unified-Kernel), as the more stable and more compatibility they get, the more reason why people will just end up dropping all other OS' altogether.

This can mean that projects in development (such as ReactOS) have alot to worry about if Linux succeeds in achieving this.
Infact, in a wild twist of irony. Projects such as ReactOS may already be accidentally speeding up this process!

I would rather use native code.

Chame_Wizard
April 13th, 2008, 11:58 PM
the only problem i had was the command and how to ....:redface:

NightwishFan
April 14th, 2008, 12:03 AM
I first got Linux so I could use an Open Source operating system. I was pretty sure I was not using Windows and that was a good thing.

ibuclaw
April 14th, 2008, 12:13 AM
the only problem i had was the command and how to ....:redface:
first I had difficulty moving from one language to another.
Then I got confused between the difference between the BASH built-in functions and command-line apps that are in the BASH $PATH.
ie:
I wrote a script on one OS that used a specific command-line app. And when I transported it to another, it didn't work was "command not found".

common first-time mistakes I made.

iain@fredbuntu:~$ cd C:\
>
bash: cd: C:: No such file or directory
iain@fredbuntu:~$ del filename
bash: del: command not found
iain@fredbuntu:~$ attrib +H filename
bash: attrib: command not found
iain@fredbuntu:~$ ??? HOW DO YOU WORK!!!!
bash: !: event not found

NightwishFan
April 14th, 2008, 12:14 AM
common first-time mistakes I made.

iain@fredbuntu:~$ cd C:\
>
bash: cd: C:: No such file or directory
iain@fredbuntu:~$ del filename
bash: del: command not found
iain@fredbuntu:~$ attrib +H filename
bash: attrib: command not found
iain@fredbuntu:~$ ??? HOW DO YOU WORK!!!!
bash: !: event not found


:lolflag:

Barrucadu
April 14th, 2008, 12:33 AM
I seem to be one of the few here who loved Linux simply because it wasn't easy or Windows - and started out straight away with the CLI.
The first thing I did after installing Ubuntu was change the desktop wallpaper, figure out how to install my wireless drivers with ndiswrapper, and read the ndiswrapper man page. In that order.

jolx
April 14th, 2008, 12:47 AM
when my dad (who is a fat **** and i hate him very much) wouldnt explain anything about computers to me and wouldnt get me one, i went and built my own. then i had the problem of paying for windows which i couldnt afford, so i typed in "free operating system" into google and i found out about linux. initially i suspected it could by some sought of malware (fud much?) but then i found these forums and that explained everything to me :)

ibuclaw
April 14th, 2008, 12:55 AM
when my dad (who is a fat **** and i hate him very much) wouldnt explain anything about computers to me and wouldnt get me one, i went and built my own. then i had the problem of paying for windows which i couldnt afford, so i typed in "free operating system" into google and i found out about linux. initially i suspected it could by some sought of malware (fud much?) but then i found these forums and that explained everything to me :)

On the First account. Three cheers to teenage rebellion! I envy you! :)
On the Second account. Building your own computer for Linux is a brilliant thing for any novice user or computer enthusiast to do!
Because you put time and effort into it, it makes it more of a personal machine and you fall in love with it just that little bit more!

ultimatsz
April 14th, 2008, 12:58 AM
to others anything that does not look like luna of windows xp or that blue bar is a mac.. i m not sure but maybe i m living with a bunch of IT amateurs

ibuclaw
April 14th, 2008, 01:08 AM
to others anything that does not look like luna of windows xp or that blue bar is a mac.. i m not sure but maybe i m living with a bunch of IT amateurs

You mean "Windows Admins"?:lolflag:
Just ask them the question:
"How do you salt the password hash?"

I assure you, that'll bring blank expressions all around!

What surprises me more are films/tv series that have computers everywhere. Almost all "just" Windows users somehow assume that it's a Windows OS or a really good Microsoft PowerPoint presentation made to look like an OS out of this world.

When, as we all know it is really Linux ;)

Take, for example:
24 - Uses KDE 1.0 in a scene.
Heroes - Uses KDE 3.? with Kopete and a Web Cam in a scene.
Die Hard 4.0 - Taking down the world? It's got to be Linux.
Matrix - Trinity uses nmap to find an open ssh port and exploits a security vunerability to hack into the matrix... Linux!
Terminator - If your going to build a human killing machine. You know it's gonna be running on your favourite OS!


Or a recent one...
Moonlight - Uses Vixta! If you don't believe me, look closer!