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Black Mage
February 20th, 2008, 06:15 AM
What do you think are the hardest majors in college?

I think it would be Chemistry, Physics, and Computer Science.

aysiu
February 20th, 2008, 06:17 AM
English was pretty easy. I always pitied my science major friends in college, as they had assignments due every week.

mkoehler
February 20th, 2008, 06:17 AM
I would have to go with the following
--------------

Hardest: Chemistry (Organic, Inorganic, Biochemistry)
Engineering (All types)
Physics

Easiest: Business

Whiffle
February 20th, 2008, 06:17 AM
Engineering, Premed. I can vouch for the engineering myself, and I know a premed or two... All the CS majors I know have a week or two of lots of gaming, and then a couple all nighters to finish a project, wash, rinse, repeat.

firenurse4
February 20th, 2008, 06:38 AM
Really its more about what you are suited to. I was an engineering major before switching to nursing. I was always strong in sciences and math but they didn't keep me interested as did nursing. Believe you me, I worked my tail off for my nursing degree and found elements of nursing (pathophysiology, pharmacology, and infectious diseases to name a few) much more challenging.

TheOrangePeanut
February 20th, 2008, 06:39 AM
The engineers at my school basically go through hell and back. I'd hate to be any of them.

Our CS department (which I belong to) isn't particularly hard. I'd say CIS and business related stuff is the easiest on campus.

selda
February 20th, 2008, 06:39 AM
I would have to go with the following
--------------

Hardest: Chemistry (Organic, Inorganic, Biochemistry)
Engineering (All types)
Physics

Easiest: Business

Combine your first two and make it chemical engineering ;-)

mkoehler
February 20th, 2008, 06:42 AM
Sure, I'd be happy to...as long as I don't have to make it my major :)

Black Mage
February 20th, 2008, 06:48 AM
The engineers at my school basically go through hell and back. I'd hate to be any of them.

Our CS department (which I belong to) isn't particularly hard. I'd say CIS and business related stuff is the easiest on campus.

CIS? Easy?

I'm a computer science major, and we have to take some challenging courses outside of computer science major such as Chemistry and Advanced Calculus, and some have to take physics.

In my school, most people tend to take one computer science course, say they just don't get it, and never look back.

yatt
February 20th, 2008, 07:00 AM
What do you think are the hardest majors in college?

I think it would be Chemistry, Physics, and Computer Science.

Engineering, Law, and Education.

Engineers and Law students have a course load which is roughly 1.5 times the load of other students. Education is the worst though. The degree itself is slightly lighter than average, but your are actually required to have a degree in something else too (typically, the subject you would prefer to teach). Part of that though is the setup of the local system.

EDIT: I forgot Medical. They have it tough too.

RAV TUX
February 20th, 2008, 07:18 AM
What do you think are the hardest majors in college?

I think it would be Chemistry, Physics, and Computer Science.My wife(see avatar) just completed her BS in Chemistry, and she is going on to pursue her Phd in Chemistry.

I have seen her studies and believe me it is hard, but she loves Chemistry.

Fred_E _krugar
February 20th, 2008, 07:23 AM
I am working on my Masters degree in Mechanical Engineering and trust me it is not that easy. Physics to me was fun that is why I have a minor in it,but I am thinking on getting my BS in Physics.

Bubba64
February 20th, 2008, 07:46 AM
Really its more about what you are suited to. I was an engineering major before switching to nursing. I was always strong in sciences and math but they didn't keep me interested as did nursing. Believe you me, I worked my tail off for my nursing degree and found elements of nursing (pathophysiology, pharmacology, and infectious diseases to name a few) much more challenging.
What is hard for some is easier for others, the highest amount of people that go to college start out as psychology majors then they realize this is a very hard subject that involves statistics and if your serious biology as your science credits. Then they realize that getting into graduate school is harder then getting into medical school due to limited allowed acceptance. Then you have to be accredited in your state if you want to be a practicing psychologist, then you have to spend a certain amount of time each year keeping up to date on required education. Then you are taking responsibility for people in a manner which is not as cut and dry as hard science. Psychology is one of the hardest jobs around and can be difficult in the educational portion of your training. This is my major, fortunately I returned back to college as an older student with many years of personal study so it is fairly easy in general for me.

sloggerkhan
February 20th, 2008, 07:50 AM
Easiest:

Business, Communications

I think business is also the only major where you take classes on using microsoft software that every other major just assumes you know how to use.

Ultra Magnus
February 20th, 2008, 09:10 AM
I think its what you're used to and what you define as hard -

I did a Masters in Physics and it was challenging but I'm glad I never did anything that required me to write an essay - I was forced to once and it was a disaster.

faraaz
February 20th, 2008, 01:38 PM
I majored in Microbiology & Biotechnology in my Bachelor's degree. Pretty damn hard if you ask me...

Now in my MBA I'm double majoring in Marketing & Finance...Marketing is a breeze...Finance is okay if you are good at Math & Statistics...

qazwsx
February 20th, 2008, 02:02 PM
I would have to go with the following
--------------

Hardest: Chemistry (Organic, Inorganic, Biochemistry)
Engineering (All types)
Physics

Physics is way harder than chemistry. At least chemistry is much more practical than physics (chemistry student in university :lolflag:). I have studied basics courses of physics and it really takes much more time chemistry. More advanced physics requires also very good math skills while in chemistry basic integration and derivation skills are enough in most cases.

In bio science you need to know so many many things by heart.

Learning chemistry is little bit both which makes it easier fo me.

Well I am science guy and never crossed border into pseudo science studies :lolflag:

regomodo
February 20th, 2008, 02:44 PM
hardest - engineering, sciences, maths, law

easiest - sport science, geography, english, psychology

Engineering is fairly easy up until the final 2years of a masters degree. Then you can say goodbye to free time and your sanity.

kamaboko
February 20th, 2008, 03:14 PM
Pick something you don't have a natural aptitude for and it'll be the hardest major you've ever done.

macogw
February 20th, 2008, 06:49 PM
I was going to say Sociology/Psychology were among the easiest and the Engineering disciplines are the hardest (so much math & science!), and then I saw this comic (http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/archive/2008-02-18-engineers-vs-sociologists.png) on http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/.

EDIT: The img tag didn't seem to be working, so it's now a link.

Black Mage
February 20th, 2008, 11:38 PM
I was going to say Sociology/Psychology were among the easiest and the Engineering disciplines are the hardest (so much math & science!), and then I saw this:
http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/archive/2008-02-18-engineers-vs-sociologists.png on http://www.wellingtongrey.net/miscellanea/

Ouch, that was a smack in the face to sociology majors.

Depressed Man
February 21st, 2008, 12:22 AM
What is hard for some is easier for others, the highest amount of people that go to college start out as psychology majors then they realize this is a very hard subject that involves statistics and if your serious biology as your science credits. Then they realize that getting into graduate school is harder then getting into medical school due to limited allowed acceptance. Then you have to be accredited in your state if you want to be a practicing psychologist, then you have to spend a certain amount of time each year keeping up to date on required education. Then you are taking responsibility for people in a manner which is not as cut and dry as hard science. Psychology is one of the hardest jobs around and can be difficult in the educational portion of your training. This is my major, fortunately I returned back to college as an older student with many years of personal study so it is fairly easy in general for me.

Assuming your going into counseling. I went into psychology originally to do counseling, got more jaded as I learned more about humans (to the point where I'd gladly destroy every single one of us if I had access to nukes. Though I'm sure how we conduct ourselves on a daily basis in general has nothing to do with that :mad:) so now I'm doing cognitive psychology. Or rather going to be specializing in Human Factor/Engineering psychology. The professor I worked with has actually noted that we just begin to see humans as cogs in a wheel.

Anyway, how hard or easy psychology is depends on your background and what you want to do with it. I have a cousin that's a civil engineer major and my best friend is a computer science major (I use to be computer science and psychology double major) and they have trouble in psychology classes sometimes. My best friend actually had trouble in the Introduction to Memory and Cognition course. Though there were alot of models, names, and theories to learn.

Also architecture is a pretty hard major as well. My girlfriend just got done with 1 out of her 4 charettes this year. (Basically a period of time where all the students get little sleep and have to do tons of work with models, axons, etc..). Beautiful work though.

ssam
February 21st, 2008, 12:32 AM
Our student newpaper published an article last week about the percentages of people graduating with different grades in different departments.


THE NUMBER of first class degrees handed out fluctuates wildly between different departments, figures released to Student Direct have revealed.

History students are three times as likely to come out with top honours than Law undergraduates despite the two courses teaching similar skills.

Statistics showed just 7.2 percent of Law undergraduates were given top honours last year compared with 31.3 percent in Physics and Astronomy.

However, the School of Law awarded a mammoth 78.2 percent of undergraduates upper second class honours degrees.

More science students come out with first class degrees than those studying humanities based courses, figures released by the university to Student Direct revealed.

Just 7.3 percent of Law undergraduates were given the highest possible classification compared with 22.6 percent of History students and 23.1 percent of English students.
http://www.student-direct.co.uk/news/degree-classifications-fluctuate-wildly

The UK degree classifications are
* First-Class Honours (First or 1st)
* Upper Second-Class Honours (2:1)
* Lower Second-Class Honours (2:2)
* Third-Class Honours (Third or 3rd)
* Ordinary degree (Pass)
* Fail (no degree is awarded)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_undergraduate_degree_classification

AmericanYellow
February 21st, 2008, 12:34 AM
I am a Biochemistry major at UCLA. The hardest major ever.

mr32123
February 21st, 2008, 01:55 AM
Mostly anything with science as a backbone is hard. I'm in Mechanical Engineering. Finally finishing up my second year. I plan on getting my Masters and maybe pick up a minor in Physics, but who knows where time will take me.

The easiest are usually the non-science based majors, i.e. education, history, business. Usually the people that can't cut it was engineers in my school switch to management. Also, I don't think Architecture is particularly hard, its just that there is a lot of work. Basically you just need good skills in time management and get everything done. Anyway, back to my hw :(

igknighted
February 21st, 2008, 02:04 AM
Easiest:

Business, Communications

I think business is also the only major where you take classes on using microsoft software that every other major just assumes you know how to use.

To be fair (and I am not a business major, I'm cs), when they learn office they learn it at a level most will never touch. I've never taken a class that assumes I can make and work with pivot tables before, for example. Yes, it might seem over the top (and I'm sure most business schools don't spend a lot of time on this), but it is rather critical to have those skills, they would be remiss if they didn't teach them.

PS: We spent a few weeks in my physics labs learning about the various statistical functions in excel, so its not only business

Depressed Man
February 21st, 2008, 02:50 AM
Also, I don't think Architecture is particularly hard, its just that there is a lot of work. Basically you just need good skills in time management and get everything done. Anyway, back to my hw :(

I suppose. I do spend alot of time in the Architecture building here (my dorm is near it). Plus it's a nice place to study when my girlfriend is working. But I do see people slacking off sometimes. Though I think the other reason why they have problems with is the professors like to change or add things to your plans (which may or may not require you to redo certain things). It isn't fun to have to redo your axons in ArchiCad because the professor wanted to change something at the last minute.

Anyway, I have a question for computer science majors. Part of the reason why I stopped doing CS is how moronic they conducted their exams. They wanted you to write the code out (by hand) on exams. Does any other CS majors at other schools do this? I always thought they should just conduct exams on the computers (Yeah I know there's a potential for cheating but that's why you a) monitor and b) don't have a LAN running).

kamaboko
February 21st, 2008, 02:57 AM
Anyway, I have a question for computer science majors. Part of the reason why I stopped doing CS is how moronic they conducted their exams. They wanted you to write the code out (by hand) on exams. Does any other CS majors at other schools do this? .

I had to write code out by hand for all of my exams.

macogw
February 21st, 2008, 02:57 AM
Ouch, that was a smack in the face to sociology majors.
My roommate is one :P I took a sociology class and got an A with no effort. It was all a bunch of stuff that just seems obvious. Mostly it was vocabulary, like more, law, value, norm, etc. Sociocultural Anthropology didn't go so well, but I didn't do any of the reading or listen to anything in class, so I didn't memorize anything about the cultures I was supposed to be learning about.

EDIT:
My roommate liked the comic and is showing it to her Soc prof.

jordanmthomas
February 21st, 2008, 03:13 AM
Anyway, I have a question for computer science majors. Part of the reason why I stopped doing CS is how moronic they conducted their exams. They wanted you to write the code out (by hand) on exams. Does any other CS majors at other schools do this? I always thought they should just conduct exams on the computers (Yeah I know there's a potential for cheating but that's why you a) monitor and b) don't have a LAN running).

Yep, when we're tested we have to write code by hand, which kind of sucks because normally when you are actually programming you have things like autocompletion, api documentation, copy and paste, etc to help you. Try writing code by hand (especially stuff like socket work in c) and you quickly realize you don't know all the parameters for every api call you thought you did.
example:

newSocketDescriptor = accept(socketDescriptor, (struct sockaddr*) &clientAddress, &clientLength); Things like this you have to memorize when in practice you'd just do a

man -S 2 accept unless you deal with it a lot and you get it memorized.

Fortunately, at my school at least, the professors are usually somewhat forgiving as far as syntax goes. They're usually more interested in seeing that you understand what's going on and WHY you're doing things.


All the CS majors I know have a week or two of lots of gaming, and then a couple all nighters to finish a project, wash, rinse, repeat.
Too true, but to be fair it always seems like I don't even know what I'm really supposed to be doing until a few days before it's due. It also always seems like when I pull an all-nighter and finish right in the nick of time they always push back the due-date. Now THAT is a spirit crusher.

Depressed Man
February 21st, 2008, 03:44 AM
Haha it seems the CS department at Maryland is always having parties (LAN games, socials, Linux install fests). I still go to some of them occasionally.

My problem with taking those exams by hand is my handwriting is horrible (well and it's slow). Which is why I takes notes on my laptop (so I can read it and keep up quickly). It just seems unnatural to me to write code when it's suppose to be typed.

igknighted
February 21st, 2008, 05:06 AM
I suppose. I do spend alot of time in the Architecture building here (my dorm is near it). Plus it's a nice place to study when my girlfriend is working. But I do see people slacking off sometimes. Though I think the other reason why they have problems with is the professors like to change or add things to your plans (which may or may not require you to redo certain things). It isn't fun to have to redo your axons in ArchiCad because the professor wanted to change something at the last minute.

Anyway, I have a question for computer science majors. Part of the reason why I stopped doing CS is how moronic they conducted their exams. They wanted you to write the code out (by hand) on exams. Does any other CS majors at other schools do this? I always thought they should just conduct exams on the computers (Yeah I know there's a potential for cheating but that's why you a) monitor and b) don't have a LAN running).

We code by hand during exams. However, often times we are allowed to have the textbook nearby so we can use the API's, makes it much easier (and more realistic of ones programming skill... when are API's not available?)

phrostbyte
February 21st, 2008, 05:54 AM
CS is not a hard major for me. I would rate Computer Science the easiest major. :)

Hardest would be something like Communications or Philosophy. Hardest to stay awake, that is. :lol:

phrostbyte
February 21st, 2008, 06:05 AM
I had to write code out by hand for all of my exams.

Yes of course. I think this is pretty standard. But in my school the higher level the class is the less emphsis on tests and more on assignments. But, damn those low level alogrithim classes sometimes have some brain busters of a test.

Anyways what I **love** about CS over other majors like English is the sheer objectiveness of the field in many respects. You take a test and you get a 85 on it, there is no arguing, you got this and this wrong, and that is why you lost 15 points. In English you turn in this essay and it comes back as an A- and you have NO CLUE why you got an A-. Many times they just put a grade on it and be done with it. I actually successfully got a term paper raised from a C to an B by arguing with the damned professor once. Isn't that sad?

I was sick of getting random grades, so I switched to CS which if you do an assignment right, you get 100 points. The objectives are clearly defined. There is no funny business in CS.

DarkOx
February 21st, 2008, 07:45 AM
Easiest:

Business, Communications

I think business is also the only major where you take classes on using microsoft software that every other major just assumes you know how to use.

I'm doing my B.Comm right now, so I guess I should rush in here to defend the thing.

A lot of the introductory business courses probably seem pathetic to a computer science major. The basic computer science course, optimization with Excel, the basic database course (using Access, naturally) all look easy. There's a good reason for this: they are.

But you're kidding yourself if you think high-level accounting isn't difficult to learn. Accounting for things like taxes, pensions and leases is difficult. Same with finance. Probably also the same with marketing and operations management.

And as an aside, classes on using MS software can be useful if they teach the skills that needed to get effective use out of the program. For example, I once took a technical communications course also required by CS and Engineering majors. Everyone in the class knew how to use PowerPoint. But not everyone knew how to give an effective presentation.

jpittack
February 21st, 2008, 09:20 AM
Hardest are probably some higher physics degrees, psychology is painful, needing a PHD for a job often, some engineering can be harder, mine is demanding hours wise but not really difficulty wise. AI related. Robotics maybe. Just my general ideas.

I would imagine figuring out how to make a processor would be pretty tough. AMD seems to be having trouble with it.:(

macogw
February 21st, 2008, 12:33 PM
CS is not a hard major for me. I would rate Computer Science the easiest major. :)

Hardest would be something like Communications or Philosophy. Hardest to stay awake, that is. :lol:


Yes of course. I think this is pretty standard. But in my school the higher level the class is the less emphsis on tests and more on assignments. But, damn those low level alogrithim classes sometimes have some brain busters of a test.

Anyways what I **love** about CS over other majors like English is the sheer objectiveness of the field in many respects. You take a test and you get a 85 on it, there is no arguing, you got this and this wrong, and that is why you lost 15 points. In English you turn in this essay and it comes back as an A- and you have NO CLUE why you got an A-. Many times they just put a grade on it and be done with it. I actually successfully got a term paper raised from a C to an B by arguing with the damned professor once. Isn't that sad?

I was sick of getting random grades, so I switched to CS which if you do an assignment right, you get 100 points. The objectives are clearly defined. There is no funny business in CS.
We used computers to write our code on our Java tests last semester, and we were allowed to go to sun.com and look at the API. Computer Architectures tests were on paper though. I liked Comp Archs. I thought Assembly would be crazy-hard, but it's actually pretty fun!

And yeah, CS is easiest for me. I just transferred into it because I know I can get As if I take CS. International Affairs was a nightmare major.

Bubba64
February 22nd, 2008, 08:25 AM
Assuming your going into counseling. I went into psychology originally to do counseling, got more jaded as I learned more about humans (to the point where I'd gladly destroy every single one of us if I had access to nukes. Though I'm sure how we conduct ourselves on a daily basis in general has nothing to do with that :mad:) so now I'm doing cognitive psychology. Or rather going to be specializing in Human Factor/Engineering psychology. The professor I worked with has actually noted that we just begin to see humans as cogs in a wheel.

Anyway, how hard or easy psychology is depends on your background and what you want to do with it. I have a cousin that's a civil engineer major and my best friend is a computer science major (I use to be computer science and psychology double major) and they have trouble in psychology classes sometimes. My best friend actually had trouble in the Introduction to Memory and Cognition course. Though there were alot of models, names, and theories to learn.

Also architecture is a pretty hard major as well. My girlfriend just got done with 1 out of her 4 charettes this year. (Basically a period of time where all the students get little sleep and have to do tons of work with models, axons, etc..). Beautiful work though.

Cognitive Behavioral type therapies are very effective, it is different then in a counseling or talk therapy work where you might let a client realize their problems through self reflection. The Cognitive approach is loved by insurers due to limited allowed sessions. One of my teachers from last semester is a Cognitive Behavioral therapist who has worked in the industry for more than 25 years and has used many techniques from Depth Psychology (Freud, Jung etc) to Gestalt to many others, he claims Cognitive is the most effective, but also says he has no long term follow up data. The APA studies show that all the mainstream constructs work in a statical breakdown equally. The key to providing good therapy is having a broad education and knowing when to refer a patient when they may have more effective treatment results from a construct you may not be comfortable with or knowledgeable about. Also key to good therapy situation is recognizing projection, transference and counter transference, these are very important concepts and can when recognized be a great help. In my experiences with other psychology majors at the college
I attend in general they assume that they may actually help people and see the results of this. This is a pipe dream, my own therapist a Clinical Psychologist with many years of experience and who is highly regarded in their own profession has said that seeing the results of your work is very difficult. We all live in our own reality so everything we think or perceive is based on our own conceptions, preconception, genetics, experiences, and are projected outward, and we want to find answers without realizing that these answers may have a bipolar tint to them. This is due to having a brain that hasn't really developed past hunter gatherer times, in other words if you hear a noise when your on the earth 100,000 - 200,000 years ago is the noise tied to something that will kill you or you can eat, black and white thinking we all do it we can't help it we want an answer. Look at all the types of religion that have been practiced over 2000 variations which actually have some recurring themes which also show up in myth and stories.

yatt
February 22nd, 2008, 11:07 AM
Anyway, I have a question for computer science majors. Part of the reason why I stopped doing CS is how moronic they conducted their exams. They wanted you to write the code out (by hand) on exams. Does any other CS majors at other schools do this? I always thought they should just conduct exams on the computers (Yeah I know there's a potential for cheating but that's why you a) monitor and b) don't have a LAN running).
My school does that for some classes, I don't see what is so wrong with it. They only reason you would need a computer is to look up API documentation, but if you have lan disabled you wouldn't have it anyways.

Its not like your prof is going to type your code into an editor and compile it to ensure it is syntactically perfect. Nor are they going to doc you if you get a function name wrong (ie size() instead of getSize()). Why would you want to be on a computer?

jordanmthomas
February 22nd, 2008, 11:45 AM
Its not like your prof is going to type your code into an editor and compile it to ensure it is syntactically perfect. Nor are they going to doc you if you get a function name wrong (ie size() instead of getSize()).

Mine do. :(
I had one professor for some earlier classes who would count the whole question wrong (as in no partial credit) if you misspelled one thing that would cause code to not compile or if you had even one slight logical error.

Even in my upper level classes most of my professors still take off a few points here or there if your syntax is off, but luckily most of the points are allocated to "do you know what you're doing?"

eljoeb
February 22nd, 2008, 12:16 PM
I'm doing my B.Comm right now, so I guess I should rush in here to defend the thing.

A lot of the introductory business courses probably seem pathetic to a computer science major. The basic computer science course, optimization with Excel, the basic database course (using Access, naturally) all look easy. There's a good reason for this: they are.

But you're kidding yourself if you think high-level accounting isn't difficult to learn. Accounting for things like taxes, pensions and leases is difficult. Same with finance. Probably also the same with marketing and operations management.

And as an aside, classes on using MS software can be useful if they teach the skills that needed to get effective use out of the program. For example, I once took a technical communications course also required by CS and Engineering majors. Everyone in the class knew how to use PowerPoint. But not everyone knew how to give an effective presentation.

My experience with business majors as opposed to certain other liberal arts majors is that they are very comfortable giving presentations and working in groups. I can't vouch for the class's difficulty, but those skills are mandatory for success on the job.

tdrusk
February 22nd, 2008, 01:33 PM
Thanks for posting this thread. I need to pick a major. I want to do two things... 1) music production and recording. 2) Computer Related Stuff (server installs and such) 3) Physics

What would I need to major in for the first 2?

Mithrilhall
February 22nd, 2008, 02:51 PM
Easiest.....

Womans Studies
African American Studies
Art
Psychology
Communications
Anything related to a social science



Hardest....

Mathematics
Engineering (Chemical, Electrical, Computer, etc...)

codym
March 20th, 2008, 07:14 PM
I'm doing my B.Comm right now, so I guess I should rush in here to defend the thing.

A lot of the introductory business courses probably seem pathetic to a computer science major. The basic computer science course, optimization with Excel, the basic database course (using Access, naturally) all look easy. There's a good reason for this: they are.

But you're kidding yourself if you think high-level accounting isn't difficult to learn. Accounting for things like taxes, pensions and leases is difficult. Same with finance. Probably also the same with marketing and operations management.

And as an aside, classes on using MS software can be useful if they teach the skills that needed to get effective use out of the program. For example, I once took a technical communications course also required by CS and Engineering majors. Everyone in the class knew how to use PowerPoint. But not everyone knew how to give an effective presentation.

I was just going to say... The degree of difficulty for a Business Degree really depends on the major. I can also see why, for example, a CS major, would think 100 and 200 level business courses are easy because, for the most part, they are. However, once you get into higher-end statistical analysis and accounting specifics in 300 and 400 level courses, it's far from easy. Still, most likely, easier than CS and other very hard degrees, but to say that an Accounting Degree is even close to being classified among easy degrees is laughable.

And like DarkOx said, many people are technically good at using MS Office apps, but suck at making it look good and organizing it, aesthetics, over-complication, execution etc. Some of my profs with crazy high IQs are culprits of this. It's not only annoying for whoever is viewing, but it also transcends through to after-school life with you career. Knowing how to use the app. to make a brilliant output is much more important than being a technical wizard at the program. Both is the best though, obviously.

Pethegreat
March 20th, 2008, 08:00 PM
Combine your first two and make it chemical engineering
and that is what I am going to college for come fall...

I would find any kind of writing or lanuage major to the be hardest for me. I find it much harder to find and correct errors in papers than in math problems. In math, you don't have crazy exceptions to rules. It you want to make somerthing plural in math, you tack a 2 on in front of what you want to make plural. In english you have to find a whole new word.

LaRoza
March 20th, 2008, 08:02 PM
The easiest major is the one you never take, and the hardest is the one you take :)

Kingsley
March 20th, 2008, 08:18 PM
I'm majoring in Chemistry, but I'm finding the intro classes for it much easier than that of Biology.

chucky chuckaluck
March 20th, 2008, 08:23 PM
music history might be the most tidious. having to listen to countless hours of gregorian chant must be like looking at a sea of 25watt lightbulbs and having to decide which one is the brightest.

LaRoza
March 20th, 2008, 08:27 PM
music history might be the most tidious. having to listen to countless hours of gregorian chant must be like looking at a sea of 25watt lightbulbs and having to decide which one is the brightest.

I love gregorian chant, I have cd's within reach of it.

chucky chuckaluck
March 20th, 2008, 08:35 PM
I love gregorian chant, I have cd's within reach of it.

there's a big difference, at least in my mind, between wanting to listen to it and having to listen to it.

jordanmthomas
March 20th, 2008, 08:47 PM
I'm majoring in Chemistry, but I'm finding the intro classes for it much easier than that of Biology.

Care to take my Chemistry class for me? It's an intro class and it's still one of the hardest classes I've had to take.

aysiu
March 20th, 2008, 08:51 PM
The easiest major is the one you never take, and the hardest is the one you take :)
Not in my case. I believe I took the easiest major (English).

JAFalcon8@aol.com
May 18th, 2008, 06:51 AM
I understand most people say the sciences. And I have seen the stress that people go through with a chem major and such.

But you are underestimating the humanities. Especially my major, Music Education.

The basic structure of the program is designed to make you fail.

I have to be an outstanding performer. And I am evaluated each year, if I do not pass, there is the possibility to be thrown out of the program all together. So much rides on one performance a year, from people who do not see you perform and grow through out the program. It has a huge possibility to mess up your career.

I have to take 6 intensive semesters of Music Theory. And at the end of my senior year, I take a Senior concentration, which is basically an oral test in front of the theory teachers of the school who ask you questions and you are supposed to answer those questions on the spot.

I take 4 semesters of Piano, sight singing and dictation. In piano unless you have any kind of piano before you get to the program you are screwed and that part becomes difficult. I have to take lessons to keep up with my piano. Also you need to pass the piano test they have at the end of each year to keep going on with the program.Sight singing is performing a piece of music in front of a class, singing obviously, and you have never seen the piece before. Dictation is writing down music you have never seen or heard before and there is basically no way to prepare. And everything must be perfect.

I also need to take all my core classes, observations, education classes. I need to learn all of the instruments that I will be teaching. I am a string player and need to be sufficient in Brass and Woodwinds. I must also be in a 6 hour a week performing ensemble that does concerts throughout the year and only receive 1 credit for the class.

The stress that comes with this major is extreme. By the time I graduate the program, half of the people I started with will have dropped out or been thrown out.

I understand science is difficult. Believe me, I would never be able to sit at a book and study all day. But also consider music. A language which most of the world does not understand. And think about the stress that is put into that. Then decide what the hardest major is. Because I am sure I can work my way around a chem book, but most of the people reading this, could not pick up a Bach Partita and identify the chordal progression from beginning to the end of the piece.

jmwilli25
February 25th, 2010, 01:05 AM
This is a pretty easy question to answer... Just think of the smartest person to have lived. Einstein, Hawking (maybe). Almost everyone that comes to my mind is/was a physicist. I mean come on, physics is math, chemistry, computer science, engineering, biology, a foreign language, philosophical, and artistic. Is there any other major out there that compares? In the academic year 2000-2001 1.2 million bachelor's degrees were awarded. Out of that only about 4,100 were in physics. That translates to 3.4 physics bachelor's per 1,000 awarded degrees. No other "major" major can compare.

venator260
February 25th, 2010, 01:38 AM
The students who seemed to have the least to do at my (public) school were Criminal Justice majors. I lived with 3 of them my senior year(and hung out with these same guys all through school) and it was amazing to me how little effort they put into things and still maintained 3.4-3.6 GPA's

user1397
February 25th, 2010, 01:44 AM
Easiest: Family, Youth, and Community Sciences (actually exists at my uni)

Hardest: Engineering, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Mathematics, Philosophy

Pogeymanz
February 25th, 2010, 02:06 AM
Hard: Physics
Easy: Psychology, Business

I'm going to sound like a total jerk because I am a physics major, but I think there are some truly challenging subjects and then all the other "hard" majors are only hard because the department wants to bust your ***.

I've taken engineering courses and it just seems like a lot of work without much actual understanding (I at least didn't need to understand anything to do well). I feel like the "pure" sciences are hard enough that they don't have to make it extra hard on students.

Mathematics is one of those subjects that you either get or don't.

And I know quite a few computer science majors who are also math majors and they'll be the first to tell you that computer science majors are mostly kids that go to college and say "Well, I'm really good at fixing my Mom's computer when she gets viruses, so I guess I'll do computer science."

EDIT: +1 to Philosophy. It is NOT easy, like some people would have you think.

jairusburd
October 3rd, 2012, 06:37 AM
I won't say one way or another, but here is a brief article on the English Major:http://www.parentsandcolleges.com/blog/bid/136377/Jairus-Burdick-English-Major-To-Declare-or-Not-to-Declare