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EmY1 C4
November 1st, 2011, 01:17 AM
I have just built a new machine, has 8 Meg(soon to be 16) and i5, w/ePCI vid , 11.10 new install. Been using Ubuntu from 8+. Have 5 USB with different versions of Linux to boot and play with .Have D-Boot Laptop w/11.10/XP for some games. NOT gonna look back with the new machine. :popcorn:

Does anyone know where I can get a touch screen KB with only A thru Z and 0 thru 9?
I know this is not the place but i have looked everywhere.

expired_fox
November 1st, 2011, 11:21 AM
Just left the ubuntu at the job: these newest changes ruined my workflow and proposed one is nowhere near as fast and efficient as older. I prefered gnome 2 to mac osx. But since there is no gnome2 nowdays, I'm moving to iMac for the job purposes (i'm software developer).
Will keep 11.04 with gnome2 as long as possible at home. Don't know how long it will be adequate enough. But I know I WILL NOT use gnome shell and unity, since their principles are defective by design: it is ever stupid idea to use tablet approach for the desktop UI.

stuartcnz
November 1st, 2011, 12:17 PM
Just left the ubuntu at the job: these newest changes ruined my workflow and proposed one is nowhere near as fast and efficient as older. I prefered gnome 2 to mac osx. But since there is no gnome2 nowdays, I'm moving to iMac for the job purposes (i'm software developer).
Will keep 11.04 with gnome2 as long as possible at home. Don't know how long it will be adequate enough. But I know I WILL NOT use gnome shell and unity, since their principles are defective by design: it is ever stupid idea to use tablet approach for the desktop UI.

The current stable release of Debian (Squeeze) is still using Gnome 2 by default.

Azyx
November 1st, 2011, 12:22 PM
The current stable release of Debian (Squeeze) is still using Gnome 2 by default.

Do you know for how long it's supported? I use 10.04LTS and that are supported till 2013 i think.

stuartcnz
November 1st, 2011, 12:48 PM
Do you know for how long it's supported? I use 10.04LTS and that are supported till 2013 i think.

I'm not sure. I also use 10.04LTS as my primary operating system, but am also using Debian Squeeze, as my understanding is that Debian is generally much longer between cycles than Ubuntu. Squeeze is certainly more stable than 10.04LTS.

Bearing in mind that Ubuntu is based on Debian, and Ubuntu is up to 11.10 now, and Debian stable is only at 6, it is probably fair to suggest that Squeeze will be supported for quite some time though.

Hylas de Niall
November 1st, 2011, 01:50 PM
Main desktop (in constant use)
was Windows 7
-> now Ubuntu 11.10/Gnome Shell :)

Medion Akoya e1210 (in constant use)
was Windows XP
-> Ubuntu 11.4/Unity
-> then Xubuntu 11.4
-> then Bodhi 1.1.0(?)
-> now Ubuntu 11.10/Gnome Shell (since 2/10/11) :)

Toshiba EA60 - 155 (occasional web browsing)
was Windows XP
-> now Dual boot Xubuntu 11.10 / Lubuntu 11.10

Toshiba NB250 (never gets used)
still Windows 7 (Home Premium)

expired_fox
November 1st, 2011, 02:34 PM
Do you know for how long it's supported? I use 10.04LTS and that are supported till 2013 i think.
I need python 2.7
Virtualenv is not a convenient solution. So, the 10.04 is not an answer, especially with my fresh hardware.

pqwoerituytrueiwoq
November 1st, 2011, 05:32 PM
It just the opposit for me. I have not time for Windows. It's take time to update (automatic in Ubuntu), takes time to find anti-virus and remove spyware (Easy and take not so much time in Ubuntu and I have never find any virus or trojan). Ububtu take a half hour to install, if you make the update after you have installed and you can use the computer during update. In windows you have to search for drivers and the update and reboot over and over.

But now with Unity, I can say your maybee right. You can't even change the size of the launcher, but I realy hope they gonna fixit till 12.04 LTS, or make the fallback easy. But still you can run 10.04 LTS, fore those who don't appreciate change for the change sake ;)
definitely, with linux i don't need to waste resources on anti-* or deal with the annoying UI (Ribbon, start menu, lack of compiz, lack of short hand copy & paste, lack of options,lack of command line functionality, etc.)
only used windows on my rig once i do not even think i put my msdn license key in it and that was to reload my ipod shuffle that had corrupted firmware and while i had it on i used asus my logo2 to change my bios splash screen and i used a old hdd i put in a mobile rack for the windows install and unplugged my other drives so in the unlikely event i need to use windows out side of a VM which i do not think i even have working as i never use it i can get it via bios boot menu (have not had a reason to delete windows from it) next time i use windows it will be so i can get my replacement battery on my laptop

stuartcnz
November 1st, 2011, 05:42 PM
I need python 2.7
Virtualenv is not a convenient solution. So, the 10.04 is not an answer, especially with my fresh hardware.

10.04 has both python 2.65 & 3.1 in Synaptic

Azyx
November 1st, 2011, 05:52 PM
I'm not sure. I also use 10.04LTS as my primary operating system, but am also using Debian Squeeze, as my understanding is that Debian is generally much longer between cycles than Ubuntu. Squeeze is certainly more stable than 10.04LTS.

Bearing in mind that Ubuntu is based on Debian, and Ubuntu is up to 11.10 now, and Debian stable is only at 6, it is probably fair to suggest that Squeeze will be supported for quite some time though.

Yes but Ubuntu LTS have similar cycle as stable in Debian, wonder if not LTS are based on Debian stable? Both still have gnome2. Well it's seems to be to find another dist. Little intersted in Debian freeBSD , but I think it still little unstable? I like the zfs for long time storage of important files, but on the other hand btrfs are also coming, but are still not stable i think. Or the tools for it anyway.

suspect x
November 1st, 2011, 06:27 PM
:KS
iam a new programmer :P and while am writing this post am still stuck with windows :(because i can't run virtual machines inside my ubuntu (i would like to install win in a virtual machine just in case :))

but once i get it working I'll completely switch, :popcorn: no doubt! :popcorn:
:KS

expired_fox
November 2nd, 2011, 09:47 PM
10.04 has both python 2.65 & 3.1 in Synaptic
Can't you read? I need 2.7. 2.7 ≠ 2.65

Azyx
November 2nd, 2011, 10:26 PM
Can't you read? I need 2.7. 2.7 ≠ 2.65

You may add PPA. I do that for program, specially internet-applications like FF, bittorrent. Here is a link to ppa for Python 2.7 on lucid (10.04) https://launchpad.net/~fkrull/+archive/deadsnakes

By the way. About virtual machines.I used virtual-box to run XP, a while ago, does it not work for you? There are also PPA for it, but little older version are in the synaptic.

/Cheers

Koyanggi
November 3rd, 2011, 03:55 AM
I installed Ubuntu 11.10 on a new 1T HDD 4 days ago. Everything is working great!! I'm not going back!!

I do have an old Dell laptop with XP on it, but I just use that for collecting dust.

bohemian9485
November 3rd, 2011, 07:20 AM
I only started using Ubuntu this September. Changed my desktop OS at work to 10.04 LTS (but retained Windows XP SP3 recovery partition (actually it was Windows 7 Professional but it was downgraded to XP), just in case :P). I'm using VirtualBox to run those custom applications (written in VB6) used by our office. When I get my own personal laptop this coming Christmas, I plan to install Linux OS on it.

christophevr
November 3rd, 2011, 02:04 PM
:KS
iam a new programmer :P and while am writing this post am still stuck with windows :(because i can't run virtual machines inside my ubuntu (i would like to install win in a virtual machine just in case :))

but once i get it working I'll completely switch, :popcorn: no doubt! :popcorn:
:KS

Go and google around for vmware for workstations. Ok it's not free (unless You wan't to experiment and use beta version of vmware server, this requires a lot of effort and knowledge). The vmware for workstations quit expensive but words his price. Then You can run almost all (except mac os) into a virtual station. With very good performance. Up to and included ubuntu 11.04 it does work perfectly. For 11.10 I do not now yet

dounowhoiam
November 3rd, 2011, 02:12 PM
I have nearly totally converted to Ubuntu Linux, 11.10 on both my netbook and pc. Dual booting on my pc for the games I sometimes tend to play, and have to use VirtualBox with XP because Kodak printers don't support linuX :(.

I turned a year ago, and never regretted using Linux for my home machines.

Barney-R
November 3rd, 2011, 02:31 PM
I haven't even attempted to read all 800+ pages on this thread, but here's my story for what it's worth.

After the Commodore 64, I'd been using $eattle $pyware from version 3.11 through to XP, but I don't agree with the (illegal?) "legal" restrictions imposed on users, the back door trojan presented as "remote assistance" in XP (how many "invisible" trojans are there?) or the numerous Index.dat files endlessly collecting information in case the police ever suspect me of a crime.

Whatever happened to "innocent until proven guilty"? Nowadays it's guilty unless you're able to prove otherwise, and how do you "prove" a negative?

I'm not a criminal. I'm doing nothing wrong. I don't have anything to hide, but I DO have a right to privacy.

Unless I'm doing something wrong, my rights begin and end where I say they do.

It seems Micro$oft is power-mad, and has already created/subverted actual laws. Why would I want to give my money to an organisation like that?

Last year I found myself in the fortunate position of being able to have a computer purpose-built to my specification, and I decided I didn't want Micro$oft products anywhere near it.

It took me about a week to get used to the basics of Ubuntu (10.10 Maverick), and I've still got a lot to learn, but I will NOT be going back to "that other operating system". I'm a Linux convert, and am currently in the process of recruiting a few more.

bluexrider
November 3rd, 2011, 05:12 PM
Been using Ubuntu since 2006. I have tried several other distros but still keep coming back to the original

tulipán
November 3rd, 2011, 09:54 PM
i am completely switched at home but the OS on my work computer is not my call. so if it were on me, i'd switch completely, but i can't :o

Chiel92
November 3rd, 2011, 11:33 PM
I'm switched completely, except for games and for C# programming stuff (which I have to do for my study)

stuartcnz
November 4th, 2011, 03:58 AM
Can't you read? I need 2.7. 2.7 ≠ 2.65

Yes I can read, can you? I did not say anything about it being version 2.7.

I'm sorry if what I wrote offended your senses with my previous reply. I don't use Python, so don't know what is specifically important about the version that you require. I had a look through synaptic, for 10.04, to see what version of Python was in there, and discovered that the default appeared to be an earlier version than you mentioned and there was a version that appears to be later, and thought it worth posting. Not to say it had 2.7.

stuartcnz
November 4th, 2011, 04:04 AM
Yes but Ubuntu LTS have similar cycle as stable in Debian, wonder if not LTS are based on Debian stable? Both still have gnome2.

My understanding, though I am open to being corrected, is that all versions of Ubuntu are based on Debian testing. The primary difference between LTS versions and the others, is the time they are supported for.

viperdvman
November 4th, 2011, 07:57 AM
I haven't completely switched over to Linux, and I'm not sure if I ever will. I still have plenty of use for Windows, and probably will for a while. But, I still use Ubuntu FAR more than I use Windows. So you could say I'm 90% switched over :D

Chiel92
November 5th, 2011, 12:21 AM
I haven't completely switched over to Linux, and I'm not sure if I ever will. I still have plenty of use for Windows, and probably will for a while. But, I still use Ubuntu FAR more than I use Windows. So you could say I'm 90% switched over :D

What kind of things do you do on Windows only?

ARooster
November 5th, 2011, 01:51 AM
I was going to give Ubuntu only a go, I even considered switching to Code::Blocks from Visual Studio entirely (in spite of CB's code completion plug-in not being quite as 'smart' as Intellisense yet), but then 11.10 came out on top of gnome chugging out that hideous desktop environment and Unity being completely useless for keeping track of several instances of several different open applications, on top of which it was suggested I should learn the keyboard shortcuts and to "just start typing to find the wanted application" (if I wanted to do everything via the keyboard I'd just run the terminal, but that kind of defeats the idea of a visual desktop environment, doesn't it?) so I currently just use Ubuntu for the couple of applications I've not got on Windows. Yes, I could run the older versions of Ubuntu, however as gnome's shown us its intended direction (which is not to my liking) and Unity is Ubuntu's idea of what a desktop should be, coupled with the serious increase in start-up time, shut-down time etc and it needing more processor power than the competitive product from Redmond I am currently moving back to Windows (at least with them I know that come the next OS the classic desktop will still be there if I want it).

Closrapexa
November 5th, 2011, 01:59 AM
I moved completely over to Linux and never looked back. A steep learning curve, but at least my computer doesn't argue with me all the time like Windows.

I used to use Gnome on Ubuntu, but I recently made a move to XKCE, since I like the cleaner interface, it feels more "gnome-like" than Unity.

mavenuparker
November 5th, 2011, 02:58 AM
Switched to Ubuntu,its been four years and Im loving it :D

Used windows 7 recently only for my project which used two softwares which could not be installed in Ubuntu :(

Hope one day Ubuntu offers support to those softwaes, rather those softwares will be compatible with ubuntu :P

viperdvman
November 5th, 2011, 08:19 AM
What kind of things do you do on Windows only?

One is Photoshop. Sure, Ubuntu has GIMP, and it's a damn good program, but it's still not quite Photoshop. I am getting the hang of GIMP a little, though, and can use it for more minor graphics editing like icons, most web graphics, etc. The big stuff (like my wallpapers, collages, etc.), I go to Photoshop. I run CS3, and I don't know how well Wine plays with it. I remember CS2 was pretty stable with it.

I also use Frontpage and Dreamweaver for webpage editing (FP for more mainstream stuff, DW for more advanced stuff). I know MS Office (FP included) plays well with Wine, but I'm not sure about Dreamweaver (again, I have CS3). So anything web-related, I go to Windows.

My main music scorewriter (NoteWorthy Composer... good beginner-to-intermediate program) is a Windows-only program. Again, I haven't experimented with Wine enough to see if it works. Also, I'm SO not used to MuseScore yet. Once I do, I could very well replace NWC with it, and thus not need Windows for my MIDI sequencing and scoring.

I also play a lot of games, especially MMORPG's. I know Wine plays well with some, but not others. Some of the free-to-play games and private free-to-play servers do not like playing well with Wine or any other virtual box. So for that kind of gaming, I'll go to Windows. However... a number of my emulators have Linux ports, so I'm actually playing those on Ubuntu. Also, Ubuntu has tons of games available to it, thus no need for Windows there. Reallt, it's only my MMORPG's that require Windows.

I also network with my XBox 360 through Windows as well. I don't know if there's a way for an XBox 360 to connect to a Linux or Mac machine or not, but for playing any of my movies and anime from my computer to my TV (at least until I replace my graphics card with an HD one), I'll use Windows.

Like I said, I have plenty use for Windows. But 90% of everything I run is through Ubuntu. I almost never run MS Office anymore except for professional applications like resumes, letterheads, essays, etc. to keep it uniform with that the company/school is using (unless said company/school is also using LibreOffice). I like Ubuntu, and while it's technically a secondary OS, I use it far more than I use Windows.

drsamuelchandrakumar
November 5th, 2011, 01:02 PM
I use Ubuntu 11.10 exclusively, currently with gnome-shell but exploring and configuring openbox as well and will be shifting over to openbox completely once its done. For any windows needs I run virtualbox with a windows 7 installation which does the job and the only game I seem to play now a days is nethack. :)

Goldiescorpio
November 5th, 2011, 01:23 PM
Hi there,

Haven't completely switched because of gaming and the fact that I'm a network-and system administrator in a corporate environment which is mostly based in Microsoft products. But if I'm not gaming I use Buntu, since 4.10...

Grtz!

riskyayush
November 5th, 2011, 02:41 PM
I have not yet switched because I still carry an iPhone and there is no iTunes comparable software available for Ubuntu. (Though iTunes is not at all my favorite but the Apple wants me to use it at any cost)

Steel44w
November 5th, 2011, 03:07 PM
I switched my netbook over to 11.10 and i'm glad not to have to deal with windows ; However my Main desktop is dual boot due to the fact that we use itunes with apple tv as our means for watching tv and music.

Tried itunes through wine not there yet.

BillyBoa
November 5th, 2011, 03:31 PM
Win 7 at work (for MS Office 2010) primarily and Wubi-Ubuntu 11.10 as secondary solution.
Ubuntu 11.10 primarily at home and secondary Win 7 dual boot (for games and ACDsee).
For me Win 7 is more stable than Ubuntu and with less bugs, but is much slower and sluggish.

tomek_wap
November 6th, 2011, 10:08 AM
Switched from OS X Tiger to Ubuntu 11.10, 64bit :)

iBook with Tiger is still my backup/mobile machine.
Ubuntu installed on 17.3" Lenovo G770.

GNOME seemed unstable, so started using UNITY, and so far it's OK, and getting used to it.

G770 was shipped with Win7 Home Premium, and I don't think I will be using it :)
Although for Windows specific applications I use virtualization on Ubuntu.
Also running virtualized Ubuntu 11.10 32bit for testing unknown apps/drivers and so on - so that I don't mess up my host installation.

See you around !

Mikeb85
November 6th, 2011, 07:37 PM
I have not yet switched because I still carry an iPhone and there is no iTunes comparable software available for Ubuntu. (Though iTunes is not at all my favorite but the Apple wants me to use it at any cost)

Clementine, Banshee (and possibly others?) can transfer music to and from iDevices... Ubuntu can also transfer some files (photos, videos, documents) They just can't update or restore the software. With iOS 5 Apple is making devices more self-sufficient, so you won't even 'need' a computer to use the devices anymore.

RadhikaM
November 7th, 2011, 07:26 AM
Officially, today I have become a 99% Linux-based user. My main desktop is now totally switched over to Ubuntu 11.10, however, I do own an iPod, so the times when I'm adding/editing new music to it - I will go on my laptop, which can't be a majority of the time.

Why? I've just been banned from everything non-brain racking gaming. I can live with that. I can become an educational gamer. I had to be more focused as a student anyway, finally starting high school and all, and Ubuntu had better help me with that.

new-2-linux
November 7th, 2011, 07:54 AM
I use Linux as my main OS but i have windows still for Itunes as well as my cad programs for school. I get really annoyed when i go onto windows because it goes so slow compared to Linux and i hardly go on the net on windows because i could get a virus where on Linux i don't worry about it. It annoying on Linux when I have made files on word at school then they don't work properly in Linux but i get used to it.

Gwaro
November 7th, 2011, 12:51 PM
I have and am so comfortable. I have also learnt alot

apollothethird
November 7th, 2011, 01:00 PM
I was going to give Ubuntu only a go, I even considered switching to Code::Blocks from Visual Studio entirely (in spite of CB's code completion plug-in not being quite as 'smart' as Intellisense yet), but then 11.10 came out on top of gnome chugging out that hideous desktop environment and Unity being completely useless for keeping track of several instances of several different open applications, on top of which it was suggested I should learn the keyboard shortcuts and to "just start typing to find the wanted application" (if I wanted to do everything via the keyboard I'd just run the terminal, but that kind of defeats the idea of a visual desktop environment, doesn't it?) so I currently just use Ubuntu for the couple of applications I've not got on Windows. Yes, I could run the older versions of Ubuntu, however as gnome's shown us its intended direction (which is not to my liking) and Unity is Ubuntu's idea of what a desktop should be, coupled with the serious increase in start-up time, shut-down time etc and it needing more processor power than the competitive product from Redmond I am currently moving back to Windows (at least with them I know that come the next OS the classic desktop will still be there if I want it).

I agree with your sentiment all the way. Unity has only a few flaws as far as I can see. One of the main one is the one you describe about not being able to pick a running application. I can't believe this basic need isn't giving priority by the developers. It's almost insane.

As a workaround, I use Docky. But I'm really hoping enough people will call this to their attention so that they will fix it. If that was fixed people wouldn't have much more to complain about.

Af far as switching all the way to Linux, I currently write and maintain my documents in Linux. However, when I have a serious letter I copy and paste it into a VirtualBox session of Microsoft Office to have it proofed (grammar checked), then put the corrected copy back into Libreoffice.

I wouldn't have to look at Windows if there were better grammar checking for Linux.

-- L. James

--
L. D. James
ljames@apollo3.com
www.apollo3.com/~ljames (http://www.apollo3.com/%7Eljames)

raekwon
November 8th, 2011, 09:58 AM
Re: poor grammar checking in Linux.

Probably because people who use Linux in general aren't a bunch of people who have a desperate need for it :)

Proprietary OS's must be created with the lowest common denominator in mind. For example, I consider that to be one of the reasons why macs do so well these days. SUPER dumbed down.

/Raekwon

CJ-1990
November 8th, 2011, 03:37 PM
G'day, my name is CJ, I'm a Ubuntu and Mint user from Australia.

I've recently and fully switched to linux due to my old Win7 Ultimate OS being a complete and utter eff-tard lol :P

I will NEVER go back to Windows voluntarily :P

I have to say, I am abso loving linux. Now, I am a what most would refer to as a "noob", I'm not very adept at linux yet, only just starting out, but so far it has been so much more enjoyable than Windows has ever been :)

Right as I'm typing this I am on my new OS: Linux Mint 11, which I installed on my external HDD, which may not seem much to you guys and gals, but to me it's a big achievement :)

As I've said, I am not very adept at linux, YET, haha :P If there is anything that could or will broaden my linux knowledge even further, I would love to know about it :)

Always looking to learn new things and expand my knowledge :) Honestly, I didn't install Mint 11 on my external HDD because I needed to... I did it for fun :)

Proud to be a part of such a helpful and diverse culture of technology.

CJ

hardwarechick
November 8th, 2011, 04:24 PM
*waves* oh hai CJ - another Aussie here lol

Anyways..

for me...I am about to take the plunge back into fulltime use of Ubuntu. I have been running a MBP for the last 3 years and it has indeed served me well (not into the whole anti-Apple/Microsoft rubbish...I just use whats best for me at the time) and as the time is nearing to upgrade my laptop once again I am now weighing heavily the pro's and con's of running a Linux system full time again.

I can see over the last 3 years Ubuntu has come a long way from when I first started using it as Hoary Hedgehog...(yes that long ago... :-P) not to sure if I am a fan of the 'new gnome' that it comes with but thats easy fixed as I still like and always have liked XFCE anyways :wink:

Running Ubuntu in a VM is something I have always done on my Mac however, so its not like I have to re-learn everything again!

Thats the joys of running Linux...don't like something...change it to suit yourself.

Whilst I have enjoyed my Mac years, I feel the need to tinker again :D that and I have now moved back across to Android as my phone platform of choice (again had been using an iPhone4 - which I loved - which also made the whole turning over to Ubuntu completly somewhat in the "too hard" basket!)

Now...there really isnt a reason not to swap, not a gamer, although previously had enjoyed gaming on Ubuntu via Wine or other methods, and a cheaper laptop that I can tinker with and get running and tweaked to my hearts content has me all a flutter right now lol

I am currently trying a Windows 7 environment to see if that made any difference for me, but frankly I just think I am now finally bored with OS X and even Windows and want to tinker and chop and hack away at my OWN system again.

Now...to find me a decent ultraportable that I can buy to do this with...lol

JayKay3OOO
November 8th, 2011, 05:41 PM
Hey.

Used Linux for about a year or so on & off. I've loved and hated using it in eual measure.

I use Puppy Linux on my laptop, Ubuntu server... ...on my server & Kubuntu on my workstation.

I always like to root for the underdog. AMD, Linux & the guy over yonder with the broken leg.

Windows 7 sits on the shelf & win server sits in a VM.

Using Linux is my life choice so if you don't like it then you can guess the rest of this sentence.:)

foxhead128
November 8th, 2011, 06:37 PM
I trashed my last Windows installation either early this year or late last year (can't quite remember when). My main laptop (a ZaReason Strata Pro 13) triple-boots Fedora 16, Ubuntu 11.10, and CentOS 6. I use Fedora more often these days, actually (dunno why, I just like it), but I keep Ubuntu partly for its compatibility with more Linux software. I don't know why I keep CentOS around, though (compared to Fedora and Ubuntu, it's rather dull as a desktop OS, though I see where it would make a good enterprise OS).

Besides my main laptop, I also have a battered Toshiba Satellite L505-S5990 laptop that runs Ubuntu 10.04, an old Sony VAIO PCV-RS630G desktop running CrunchBang 10, and an ancient Sony laptop that also runs CrunchBang 10 (dunno the model type; it's like 10 years old, though). All of them are old, former Windows boxes that I salvaged by installing Linux on them.

As for the rest of my family members, they're all Appleheads, except my youngest brother - aside from the four Linux boxes I own, the household has two MacBook Pros (one runs Snow Leopard and the other runs Lion) and an iMac (running Leopard), none of which I use for any serious purpose except occasional cross-platform testing.

dinutu
November 8th, 2011, 07:36 PM
I am with Ubuntu since 2007, first time tried linux in 2002, having hard times with unity, with much regret i will switch to something else this weekend but it will be linux definitely!

koxx.dta
November 8th, 2011, 08:03 PM
if i could root my android devices on ubuntu i would have no need for windows lol, but no windows on my laptop

Mikeb85
November 8th, 2011, 08:08 PM
if i could root my android devices on ubuntu i would have no need for windows lol, but no windows on my laptop

From what I understand you can, just most of the 1 click mods are for Windows...

jmadero
November 8th, 2011, 08:24 PM
I switched over years ago but I do have a XP virtual machine that I have for the very rare (maybe 3 times a year) that I need to test something out for work. I actually was using it a bit a few months ago for Access for work but that project faded and since then have only booted into it once to test a driver (also for work). Personal use, never use Windows, haven't missed it one bit. I am thinking of making a change away from Ubuntu and to Mint because of some choice Canonical has made recently but still will probably stick with Debian based distro (or possibly Fedora).

And, I've rooted several Android devices using Linux, always easier than in Windows

Azyx
November 8th, 2011, 09:02 PM
[QUOTE=CJ-1990;11437407]G'day, my name is CJ, I'm a Ubuntu and Mint user from Australia./QUOTE]
How are your experience of differense between Mint and Ubuntu?

danyc05
November 8th, 2011, 09:26 PM
I was a heavy ubuntu user up til 11.04.. i never really had many problems with 11.04.Unity is not horrible but I still prefer the older gnome 2 style like most of the people. The only reason i switched was because I began getting bored of unity and not being able to customize it as much as i use to so i went back to windows 7. I stayed on windows 7 for a while and my curiosity started getting to me, which has probably happened to many linux users lol, and i installed ubuntu 11.10. so far its not that bad.. I've had a minor freeze here and there which never usually happened to me before but Unity does look a bit nicer..im still not sure how long ill keep it though..

cmcanulty
November 8th, 2011, 10:50 PM
I have been Ubuntu for years but after atruggling with Unity and trying every fix I can find I am going to mint. Unity stalls my computers and is extremely aggravating but I will miss Ubuntu a lot. Maybe if a classic option becomes available in future I will be back.

katya_sehgal
November 14th, 2011, 05:12 PM
switched to ubuntu 11.10 yesterday.

ramster64
November 15th, 2011, 10:43 AM
Been back and forth for years mainly because i used Adobe products for graphics work but now am since beginning of 2011 100% Linux. Well at least on my own network, work stuff (IT consultant job) is still MS ;(

Gimp and Inkscape replaced Photoshop and illustrator and looking towards HTML5 canvas to use instead of flash.

I am very happy to have made the move i was fighting it due to laziness for ages as i did not want to learn new programs but have made the jump and glad for it.

Main distro is lubuntu as i don't really like Unity plus it makes my machine's run nice and fast ;)

marl30
November 15th, 2011, 06:42 PM
I had completely switched to Linux for an entire year. I had some hardware failure that forced me to go back to Windows for a time. I bought new hardware at the time of the release of Ubuntu 11.10. Tried 11.10. Though I liked the improvements in Unity, the changes brought about by Gnome Shell and GTK 3 integration was a disappointment, as a lot of settings were missing, plus 11.10 ran a bit slower, and gaming was not impressive as before, so I'm back to dual booting with Windows 7.

I also switched to Kubuntu 11.10, which is a lot faster than Ubuntu 11.10, plus gaming is working flawlessly as before. I have fewer reasons to use Windows 7 now. My only issue with Kubuntu.... I get occasional Plasma Desktop crashes.

johngreen12
November 18th, 2011, 07:26 PM
I use Ubuntu but I'm considering going back to windows or an older version of Ubuntu if I can't fix some problems in 10.04

Azyx
November 18th, 2011, 07:33 PM
I use Ubuntu but I'm considering going back to windows or an older version of Ubuntu if I can't fix some problems in 10.04

I don't think older version than 10.04LTS are good.

tyhee88
November 19th, 2011, 12:23 AM
I started the migration in 2008 and finished it about a year and a half ago, the last change being switching my company's books to gnucash. I use Mandriva 2010.2 on the notebook, Mint 9 main edition (LTS based on Ubuntu 10.04) on the three work desktops and Debian Testing with an XFCE desktop on the home desktop.

zyfranklin
November 20th, 2011, 02:57 PM
I used both Windows 7 and Ubuntu 11.10. Because I need to work with AutoCAD, CorelDraw, 3dsMax, and most of all, I need to use MS Office, which would break in the environment of PlayOnLinux. I like PC games, too, most of which could not be worked on Linux.
I was not delighted with the changes made in Ubuntu 11.10, which made the fan of the ati card work all day, very noisy. When the official drivers were installed, I could hardly move my mouse and type a word. Did Canonical want the users turn to other release of Linux, such as CentOS, SUSE?

SpaceShuttleFan
November 20th, 2011, 04:22 PM
Windows-I still need my Flight Simulator X.
Mac-All my documents are on that partition.
Ubuntu-Fun to play with when I'm bored. Open source FTW!

ceti331
November 21st, 2011, 04:27 AM
sadly I always gravitate back to a commercial OS's IDE (Devstudio or Xcode).
Doing iOS development got me 'closer' to linux via the mac.

at the minute i am simply most productive with Devstudio, damn microsoft got me, and the apple multitouch trackpad gets me too; and anyone i have to work with is 99% likely windows based.

i *want* to be mostly linux based out of principle but never quite manage it.

recommendations for IDE's or text editors which can handle build output welcome. i find gedit ok,i can't get used to anything that doesn't use ctrl-xcv. i'd really like a text-mode text editor that functions like that.

i liked mac OSX snow-leopards desktop management the most which of course kwin can match - but with a really good IDE (like devstudio) it has all the smart navigation inbuilt.. intellisense, hotkeys to jump to definition or open header files all working real well, etc..

grimslider75
November 21st, 2011, 11:14 PM
Oh yeah baby! Just quit gaming and Linux is the bomb. It has changed my computer life! No more freezing, viruses, useless updates and proprietary software! It's a computer lovers paradise!

CMXILies
November 22nd, 2011, 05:53 PM
I still play games from time to time, thankfully I have this forum and others like it to help me in getting them to work in Ubuntu. The only thing I use Windows (Vbox) for is my darn lexmark and for some reason bitpim has trouble with my phone in Ubuntu. Nevertheless - Ubuntu RULES!

Skara Brae
November 22nd, 2011, 10:37 PM
A couple of months ago, I built my own, new computer: based around an Intel Core i5-2500K (a very impressive CPU), and to be honest I built it only for games. Crysis 2, Mass Effect 2, HAWX 2, Portal 2 are a few of the older games that I am currently playing.

My "main" computer - the one I am now here with - has an Athlon64 4000+ and a Geforce 6600GT (AGP). "Lucid Lynx" runs great on it. The games I mentioned will probably not run on Ubuntu :)

Until games do run on Linux, I am stuck with Windows.

Oh yes, there is also the Windows-only "CorelDRAW Graphics Suite", compared to which "The GIMP" is un-usable (no offense to the The GIMP programmers).

roger_1960
November 23rd, 2011, 12:11 AM
Since 2007 for my business and personal use (3 laptops)

larjan
November 23rd, 2011, 05:00 AM
I've been on linux since ubuntu 8.04. I have windows 7 on my wifes laptop as she isn't ready to make the leap yet, though the only time I use it is to fix it (usually facebook). Though it may take more effort to set up linux to your liking, I have to say, at least you "can" set up linux to your liking. As far as security, I have never had that much trouble securing windows. But I do rather enjoy not having to screw with it in linux. I have had my share of issues with linux but I figured it's part of the learning curve. I have a solid, stable 11.04, configured to my liking, everything works fine. What more could you ask for.

rjs987
November 23rd, 2011, 02:30 PM
I am finally back on Linux as my primary OS at work. I've been almost nothing but Linux at home for 4 years now with the only exception of my Garmin GPS (Windows XP vm in vbox).At work now I am on Ubuntu 11.10 and can do many of my tasks there for network shared file access, mainframe, document editing, even though my workplace is a microsoft shop. There are some of our primary programs that are either from microsoft for made for only microsoft so I run Windows 7 in a vbox vm for those. I find that I can use LibreOffice for 90%+ of the documents/spreadsheets I need to edit or work in. Almost all of those are also used/edited by other members of my team in microsoft Office 2010.

morhin
November 23rd, 2011, 05:19 PM
I'm so new that this is my first reply.

I started with an old Mepis book and cd that I found at the library. It was fun so I got an updated version and put it on an old laptop. Then I tried PCLinuxOS about a year ago. I struggled a bit with both of those and went back to the library to seek some help. Found Ubuntu For Non-Geeks by Grant and Bull. It's great having a guide/reference book handy. Sometimes there's just tooooooo much info on the web. I'm still working my way through it but I'm having more fun than I've had in a long time.
I'll stay with the Lucid Lynx 10.04 for a bit while I'm working my way through.
Heck, I've even got to learn to use the forums.
We still have a Windows Vista in the house as it contains many years of familiarity and stuff but.... I think I'm gonna like this linux stuff so I'm slowly moving things over.

Now, I'm going to go see if anyone has a driver for an HP Laserjet wireless printer.

MacDuff
November 23rd, 2011, 06:33 PM
Started using Linux with Ubuntu 8.04 and Linux is now the default OS on my four computers.

Had to install VirtualBox to run an MS Windows accounting application that my wife refuses to give up, and a drafting application that I refuse to give up. Found excellent Linux apps for every other need including my professional photography.

Still have one machine with dual boot MS Windows 7 and Kubuntu but have never booted Win 7 since creation.

Installed Linux on six friend's computers. Two went back to Windows because they were elderly, their families use MS Windows and they wanted the "local" support. The other four are still with totally with Linux though one is having lots of grief with the upgrade to 11.10.

I have to do a lot of hand holding on that one and I will likely have to change that system to Mint 11 to solve all the problems. That or lose a convert. Have been testing Mint and it seems to play great right out of the box.

I have found that it is not enough to merely install Linux and do an orientation. One often has to change the mindset of the user, not always an easy task particularly when (little) bugs crop up repeatedly. That happens with MS Windows too but people tend to accept it from MS more than from the "upstart".

cmcanulty
November 23rd, 2011, 11:31 PM
HP in general has decent linux support.

naveenharshan
November 24th, 2011, 10:26 AM
severed ties with windows and everything microsoft a couple of years ago. been using ubuntu till recently. switched to Kubuntu from 10.10

buddhuu
November 24th, 2011, 11:20 AM
Have to use Windows in the office, but on my own machine it's Linux all the way. I hardly ever even use Wine.

Actually, even at work I cheat. I take my laptop in and work on that 70% of the time, so even there I only touch Windows when it's unavoidable.

MarkC3pO
November 24th, 2011, 10:02 PM
I have haven't logged into Windows in a couple of weeks. I think I'm ready.




__________________
Denise Minger (http://youtu.be/heWprUncqIw)

conservativetroll
November 24th, 2011, 11:47 PM
I have one pure linux machine. This one an older HP 64 bit Pavilion AMD Turion that used to have XP. One machine still has a dual boot, because i have some cad software (that i own) outright. Don't know if i want to deal with a virtual machine and whatever issues that may!


Does any one know if there is a version of Linux i can load on a virgin netbook, and kick bill gates to the curb?? I'm thinking of the Acer netbook that has 1gig of ram and the atom processor the Aspire 1. I'll have to have my shooter/linux buddy or the local linux guru load it if possible!

MacDuff
November 25th, 2011, 01:04 AM
I have installed Ubuntu Netbook remix on an Acer Aspire One and I have also installed Kubuntu 11.10 on the same machine. Both worked well.
Mac

Rubykuby
November 25th, 2011, 02:27 PM
I have one pure linux machine. This one an older HP 64 bit Pavilion AMD Turion that used to have XP. One machine still has a dual boot, because i have some cad software (that i own) outright. Don't know if i want to deal with a virtual machine and whatever issues that may!


Does any one know if there is a version of Linux i can load on a virgin netbook, and kick bill gates to the curb?? I'm thinking of the Acer netbook that has 1gig of ram and the atom processor the Aspire 1. I'll have to have my shooter/linux buddy or the local linux guru load it if possible!

I can recommend the Aspire One. I do, however, recommend at least 2 GB RAM, too.

sammiev
November 25th, 2011, 06:24 PM
4 GB RAM to be safe. :)

peyre
November 25th, 2011, 10:14 PM
Don't know if i want to deal with a virtual machine and whatever issues that may!
Virtual machines are awkward. As great an option as they are, they do have drawbacks.


Does any one know if there is a version of Linux i can load on a virgin netbook, and kick bill gates to the curb??
You should probably check out the Ubuntu Netbook Remix. I'd also recommend trying Lubuntu--that's what I use on my laptop, which is an old machine; I kind of use it like a netbook, and the lightweight distro makes the most of this old machine.

ThickPizza
November 25th, 2011, 11:02 PM
You should probably check out the Ubuntu Netbook Remix. I'd also recommend trying Lubuntu--that's what I use on my laptop, which is an old machine; I kind of use it like a netbook, and the lightweight distro makes the most of this old machine.

+1 For Lubuntu
My parents use an old laptop with 1 GB of RAM and with Windows it would take 2-3 minutes to load Firefox. On Lubuntu it takes only seconds, with everything else working much better and crisper as well.

About a year ago Windows bricked itself while installing -get ready- a Java Update! :confused: Got fed-up with it, switched to Ubuntu and have never looked back.

gfd_2
November 25th, 2011, 11:05 PM
I'm about 99.5% Linux. I use VirtualBox for Netflix and Garmin's Web Updater for my watch and our 2 GPS devices.

Old_Grey_Wolf
November 26th, 2011, 12:28 AM
I have seen this thread for many years and finally decided to post in it.

I was using computers when Bill Gates and Steve Jobs were teenagers. Come to think of it, Linus Torvalds was an infant.

Linux is just another operating system for me. I have seen them come and go. I will use what works for me at the time.

So, no. I will never rely on just one OS.

ShinIori319
November 26th, 2011, 02:52 AM
I am not a full user myself, since I have also three Windows installs in this computer (XP, Vista, 7), mostly for gaming and testing purposes. But I have begun to use Linux more than the others lately.

wolfen69
November 26th, 2011, 07:02 AM
I have seen this thread for many years and finally decided to post in it.

I was using computers when Bill Gates and Steve Jobs were teenagers. Come to think of it, Linus Torvalds was an infant.

Linux is just another operating system for me. I have seen them come and go. I will use what works for me at the time.

So, no. I will never rely on just one OS.

Same here.

Jerry41
November 26th, 2011, 05:26 PM
The good news - I can finally report that I have completely switched to Linux. I gave up on Legacy Family Tree and now use Gramps for genealogy. I finally found a procedure that actually works to install "Image Scan! for Linux" and am able to use my Epson scanner on Ubuntu 10.04.

The bad news - I installed Ubuntu 11.10 (leaving 10.04 in place & dual booting) and generally dislike it. I gave "Unity" about 2 days before I switched to Gnome. This distro still doesn't "feel" right & I am now looking around for one that does.

dRounse
November 27th, 2011, 03:55 AM
I made the complete switch last year, and i don't regret it at all. I remember before I ever used Linux people told me not to because at the time I wasnt very big into computers, but I wanted a fast and secure OS. I ultimately started with Linux Mint about 2 years ago and then used regular Ubuntu (when it was good) I stopped using Ubuntu when they decided to put Unity as the DE but I have tried pretty much all the big distros, more recently I tried openSUSE 12.1 but i wasn't that much of a fan, I loved Debian but seemed to have trouble with IceWeasel, every time I installed it. I love computers and i love toying around with them but after 2 years of it i figured out that i like a nice clean looking DE, I dont like Unity I dont see it as something thats slowing down my work flow like some people might, i just dont like it. I also dont like KDE very much, or Gnome 3, I do love Gnome 2 which is why I liked Debian 6 so much. I havent really used Xfce but I plan on it, i had a not so great experience before, but I plan on using it again. Well after all of this you may be thinking what do I use? Right now I use Lubuntu 11.10, I think it is the best one out there. It is fast and to me doesnt seem too lightweight (although it is really lightweight) next week I am getting an Android phone and next month I am getting a tablet which will also be running Android. I have chosen to stay away from MS and Apple (except for my iPod, but when Linux makes an iPod i will use it) because of the strong hold they have on patents and stuff, suing other companies over silly things.

Befind
November 27th, 2011, 06:49 PM
I haven't used a windows os in about a 1 1/2 years. I don't game too much anymore and if I do its old PC games (hexen, doom, heretic, blood, Witch Haven and so on) and I just use DOS box. As of now I don't see a use to all the other Rent and Use OS.

tomek_wap
November 27th, 2011, 08:33 PM
After a month of using Linux, I know I won't go back :)

Although I have an XP on VMWARE for heavy photo post-processing.
A total of 8GB of RAM, where 4GB goes for VMWARE with 2 CPU's allocation - works like a rocket!

Windows 7 Home Premium @ dual boot, only for some gaming when I'm bored.

pbanerjee
December 2nd, 2011, 11:30 PM
I am 100% on Ubuntu. There is no other OS on my laptop. My requirements are internet, email, Office stuff, ebooks, Project management apps, FOREX trading, photography (imaging) and astrology applications.

I am not a techie but have become an amateur at that :-) I did have problems last year when I screwed up grub and my system didn't boot. But I was determined not to go back to Windows. Today, I do ALL my work on Linux.

Talking of applications, Forex platform mt4 does work well using Wine. This website is helpful in general : http://machine-cycle.blogspot.com/2009/10/wine-and-missing-mfc42dll.html

For Forex, I use Oanda (live) and MB Trading demo mt4. Oanda has java platform so it works fine on Linux using Sun java, thought I have their mt4 as well. Mt4 works excellent on Wine. I am soon going to put mt4 as platinum app on wine website. I use Lucid with wine version 1.3.31

Most popular free Astrology application JHora is supposed to run only on windows but it runs on wine just like it does on windows.
I believe that there is always a solution to windows-only situations.. at least in a larger context.

cdavid13
December 3rd, 2011, 12:01 AM
I use ubuntu on two of my machines while one I have to have Win 7 for my school work. Not much of a gamer and suppose when I am out of school I will have another 100GBs of HD space free

Kolusion
December 3rd, 2011, 01:30 AM
I want to erase Windows but unfortunately, I'm still a gamer at heart.

I am the same. This reason is the most common reason why people hang onto Windows. The problem with most Linux developers is that most are out of touch with reality, which is why Linux has been sitting on 1% marketshare for the last, well forever! With iD Software's open-source engines, the community and developers such as Canonical could produce great games and luir more people in the Linux world. Older people don't like change, or hassles, but younger people are more tolerant. Old people won't switch to Linux, its the younger people that will, and if younger people can't play there games, then they will not give up Windows. Simple.

Sam_Scribbler
December 3rd, 2011, 08:00 AM
Old people won't switch to Linux

I don't know about that. I've gotten several to at least consider it by waving the "virus-free" flag in front of their panic-stricken faces.

On topic:

I can proudly say that my family has been completely Microsoft-free for nearly a year. Mine and my sister's laptops both run Xubuntu 11.10, my dad's desktop runs a custom Debian Squeeze base, and my girlfriend's boots Mint LXDE 12. I first used KNOPPIX to backup data from a dying Windows partition, then used it to bypass Windows XP's fidgety wireless drivers to access facebook. It took a brand-new Vista install getting a virus to push me over the edge and replace it with Ubuntu 10.04. After realizing that everything I could do in Windows I could do in Linux, but better, I fell in love and never looked back.

Banglaboy
December 7th, 2011, 06:16 PM
Dear friends,
I am using Ubuntu 11.10 dual booting with windows 7. (Ubuntu is installed inside Windows through Wabi). I want completely switched to Ubuntu 11.10 but keep ubuntu present setting and program (not want to download all those again after fresh install). Now, is it possible any way to remove Windows 7 completely and keep present ubuntu .....
Thanks ..... all

boazjones
December 7th, 2011, 09:07 PM
My Asus G50v is 100% pure Linux...

yoramdavid
December 7th, 2011, 10:25 PM
On my Desktop I have Windows XP only, I had too many problems with hardware installation such as screen resolution, TV card, keyboard. Last installation of Ubuntu failed, there is no Grub to choose a OS, so I gave up there.

Laptop:
I still have a windows partition with Windows XP.
The reason are applications I have not succeded in making work in Ubuntu: Voipbuster, (I do not want to use wine), others I have not found an equally good substitute: Photoshop (I use Gimp, Xara and SK1), Dreamweaver (I use KompoZer), Foxit PDF Editor (I use PDF editor but I cannot insert images with it), Flash, Autocad.
Since I only need those (substitutes do most of what I want - perhaps I do not know how to use them yet), I spend months without booting into windows.

But I am hoping one day to switch completely to ubuntu.

Regards,

Yoram

leclerc65
December 7th, 2011, 10:59 PM
Old people won't switch to Linux
Retired, I switched 3 years ago after yanking the yoke of my company forced-fed Windows.

ghicksrn
December 8th, 2011, 03:52 AM
I haven't booted Windows in a long time on my computers. My company provides Windows computers at work and I use a Citrix client when home, if needed, to have that company forced Windows use satisfied. For my personal use, I removed Windows 7 from my computer and have only Ubuntu installed. I don't really want that virus trap on my computer. My 7 yr old and my 11 yr old both use Linux, as does my wife. All of us hate the thought of booting into Windows.

batharoy
December 8th, 2011, 03:55 AM
I still keep a small partition with windows 7, for walking my family thru procedures over the phone. I haven't used for myself in nearly 2 years.

3pinner
December 8th, 2011, 04:04 AM
Older people don't like change, or hassles, but younger people are more tolerant. Old people won't switch to Linux,

I'm 58. I like change. Switched to Ubuntu 5 years ago and haven't looked back.
What I don't like are blanket opinions with no basis.

c.cobb
December 8th, 2011, 04:20 AM
I'm 58. I like change. Switched to Ubuntu 5 years ago and haven't looked back.
What I don't like are blanket opinions with no basis.

Ditto that. 50+ and switched 99% to Ubuntu a year ago -- but I worked in Unix R&D Labs in Silicon Valley for many years (though maybe he was referring to OLD people :-)

chinmay3
December 8th, 2011, 05:45 AM
Dear friends,
I am using Ubuntu 11.10 dual booting with windows 7. (Ubuntu is installed inside Windows through Wabi). I want completely switched to Ubuntu 11.10 but keep ubuntu present setting and program (not want to download all those again after fresh install). Now, is it possible any way to remove Windows 7 completely and keep present ubuntu .....
Thanks ..... all
"Remastersys" is best option for this. Search & install it. It makes iso image of your current os with all your settings & softwares. But i don't know if it work for 11.10 i am lucid linux user. It is perfectly working for me.

( Please ask questions in new thread.)

Jerry41
December 9th, 2011, 04:45 AM
Older people don't like change, or hassles, but younger people are more tolerant. Old people won't switch to Linux, its the younger people that will, and if younger people can't play there games, then they will not give up Windows. Simple.

If it weren't for my aversion to sweeping generalities, I might say that older people are probably less afraid of change than younger people.

Anyway, I first installed Ubuntu about 5 years ago when I was 65. I removed windows from all of my PCs about a year ago. I am dual-booting 10.04 and 11.10 on this HP desktop (don't much like 11.10 & may replace it with OpenSuse 12.1). I have an older Compaq on which I am running Bodhi - just so I have a backup.

comment - I don't post here very often, and the policy seems to be that I can no longer edit my profile to reflect what I am actually running until I have 50 or more posts.

sammiev
December 9th, 2011, 05:23 AM
I am the same. This reason is the most common reason why people hang onto Windows. The problem with most Linux developers is that most are out of touch with reality, which is why Linux has been sitting on 1% marketshare for the last, well forever! With iD Software's open-source engines, the community and developers such as Canonical could produce great games and luir more people in the Linux world. Older people don't like change, or hassles, but younger people are more tolerant. Old people won't switch to Linux, its the younger people that will, and if younger people can't play there games, then they will not give up Windows. Simple.

Hmmmm "
Old people won't switch to Linux, its the younger people that will. Please do not talk for me.

paulnewall
December 10th, 2011, 04:03 PM
Kodak printers should now work in unbuntu 11.10 for the ESP xxxx series or using the latest version of c2esp from sourceforge for the Cxxx or Hero series.
http://sourceforge.net/projects/cupsdriverkodak/

fibster
December 11th, 2011, 02:44 AM
Linux only for 7 + years now. My kids have windows 7 and a macbook and I use windows xp at work but home it is linux.

Slackware, Ubuntu and fedora

Methuselah
December 11th, 2011, 03:34 AM
Haven't used windows for years. I only have an installation of Xp in VirtualBox for when I'm compelled to use a windows program that won't work well in wine. I've never owned a copy of Windows Vista or Windows 7. Because I've built my own computers since switching, my current machines have never had windows on them at all.

I have a few games from when I used to run Windows but I'm not an avid PC gamer. I use a (non-microsoft) videogame console for most of my gaming needs. PC Games can be a problem because getting them to work in wine can be frustrating and they'll not function well in virtualbox either. If the main reason you have a computer is the latest hi-def games, you might as well stick with windows. Microsoft is quite well entrenched there with the PC/XBox ecosystem and I don't think it will change imminently.

Ego Death
December 12th, 2011, 09:14 AM
I would if I could stand playing console games entirely but as the currency goes....

WASD, it's what moves me.

CMXILies
December 13th, 2011, 01:17 AM
Not only me, but I've actually got my whole household running either Ubuntu or Mint (the older folks seem to prefer Mint) ;) Score 5 for Linux.

RealityMaster
December 13th, 2011, 01:33 AM
I've been off *doze since Vista came out. The hardest to leave IMHO was Server. *nix is effing powerful, but no where near as easy to setup a complete network that "just works." Amahi is attempting to remedy this, but it's got a LONG way to go before it catches up with MS Server.

Yes almost anything you can do with MS you can do with *nix, but it's only for those with lots of time to read man pages and lookup obscure errors that you WILL run into configuring even a basic network.

That being said, I've got LOADS of time ;)


OpenBSD PF firewall
Ubuntu 11.10 workstation
Ubuntu 11.10 XBMC (The bane of my existence, and the coolest PC in the in my home)
Fedora 14 (Amahi)
Gentoo Astrisk box (I have a home business and Astrisk is the way to go)
LinuxMCE (testing, mostly a PITA and not worth the work)
MacBook Pro (dual boot Ubuntu, but rarely use OSX anymore, it's only still there because I haven't upgraded all my music to DRMFree)



If anyone has any suggestions for Linux home automation, I'd be very interested, LinuxMCE is horrible, and XBMC no where near as powerful as I am looking for.

xfatherjack
December 13th, 2011, 04:34 PM
I'm another 'Old Fogie'in my sixties, 'afraid of change'..my a**,
The only changes I don't like is the 'improvements' that limit my choices and access to controling MY Compute-envoirnment.
To be able to re-install you current settings 'in full' wont'be easy.
I tried Remastersys several times in the last week and it did not work for me.

This process below restored 99% of my System in one go!

Save a list of your installed packages on the old machine with the command " dpkg --get-selections > ~/packages ",
this will save a plain (gedit) text File named "packages" on the Home Folder.
Copy this "Packages" File on to a USB.
You can then restore your 'Packages/Programes' on the new Computer by copying the file to the Home Folder of the New Computer and run this command ...
sudo dpkg --set-selections < ~/packages && apt-get dselect-upgrade.
Note: I had to 'Log-in' as 'root' User to be sure it worked.
As 'root' user there are 2 'Home' folders, Save the 'packages'
text file to the 'Home' Folder you created for 'yourself'

It should work! for me it installed all but 5 out of 1,997 packages, One of which was 'GoogleChrome', do a list and compare.

xfatherjack
December 13th, 2011, 07:12 PM
This is another way that I found on the internet that will save all your work (Downloaded-Installed Programs/Packages).

Open a Terminal and paste these commands...
$ sudo apt-get install dpkg-repack fakeroot

$ mkdir ~/dpkg-repack; cd ~/dpkg-repack

$ fakeroot -u dpkg-repack `dpkg --get-selections | grep install | cut -f1`
This command will probably take hours to complete, depending on the size of your system. It will leave you with a Directory with up to, or in excess of 2,000 “.deb” Packages-Applications in a Folder "dpkg-repack" in your “home” folder.

Save the Folder "dpkg-repack" on to a USB or external HD

To re-Install 'all' onto a 'Fresh' ubuntu system.
In Terminal,
Go to the folder with the packages... "dpkg-repack" and ….
Input the following command
sudo dpkg -i *.deb
Again this command will probably take hours to complete.
To finalize everything, run..
sudo apt-get dselect-upgrade

xfatherjack
December 13th, 2011, 07:17 PM
This is another way that I found on the internet that will save all your work (Downloaded-Installed Programs/Packages).

Open a Terminal and paste these commands...
$ sudo apt-get install dpkg-repack fakeroot

$ mkdir ~/dpkg-repack; cd ~/dpkg-repack

$ fakeroot -u dpkg-repack `dpkg --get-selections | grep install | cut -f1`
This command will probably take hours to complete, depending on the size of your system. It will leave you with a Directory with up to, or in excess of 2,000 “.deb” Packages-Applications in a Folder "dpkg-repack" in your “home” folder.

Save the Folder "dpkg-repack" on to a USB or external HD

To re-Install 'all' onto a 'Fresh' ubuntu system.
In Terminal,
Go to the folder with the packages... "dpkg-repack" and ….
Input the following command
sudo dpkg -i *.deb
Again this command will probably take hours to complete.
To finalize everythin, run..
sudo apt-get dselect-upgrade

sunfromhere
December 14th, 2011, 11:46 AM
No Windows on this laptop, bought it in August (it came with freeDOS), so I installed Ubuntu (never used it before).

I do miss some of the games which I'm not able to run trough Wine, but instead of dual-booting, I'm mailing those gaming companies with inquiries when the said game will be available on Ubuntu :D So far, only PopCap have responded (this was part of the response: "It is important considering the amount of people that started to use Linux Ubuntu"). So, I'm (naively?) expecting PlantsVsZombies for Linux somewhere in the first half of 2012.

mr.neonano
December 14th, 2011, 12:12 PM
help me with microsoft office 2010...and microsoft visual studio 2010 to be run on linux.......then am done

matt_mccarron
December 14th, 2011, 12:48 PM
you don't need office! You've got libre office!

4 laptops, 1 desktop running ubuntu, and one desktop running Mythbuntu!

awesome. and one crappy netbook running iTunes to update our iPhones... that is the only windows comp... and it never gets turned on...

Linux rules, mainly because of you people! What a great community to belong to!

skotos
December 14th, 2011, 09:59 PM
My notebook is now running 3 GNU/Linux distros:



Arch :D
Oneiric :D
BackTrack ;)

and the same 3 OSes are running on the netbook I always carry with me.


Further on, NAS servers, Multimedia Hard Drives and the desktop are running GNU/Linux as well: embedded Linux and Arch, respectively.


So YES, :popcorn: GNU/Linux is my only OS and I can proudly confirm to have definitely switched to it.


Native Windows Vista and 7 Home Edition have never been switched on, but - instead, have been simply backed up to an external hard drive.:D It might be fun to run their setup in the future to look at how they were... Eh eh eh!!

desnaike
December 15th, 2011, 02:40 AM
Have been running just linux since 2006 currently

Desktop Kubuntu 11.10/Fedora 15 gnome3

Laptop Kubuntu 11.10

works for me.

MoonLitOwl
December 15th, 2011, 04:28 AM
I'd switch over completely, but I worry that my Bamboo Connect wont work in Ubuntu. =(

skotos
December 15th, 2011, 10:31 AM
... but I worry that my Bamboo Connect wont work in Ubuntu. =(
Googling now I found this (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=ubuntu%2011.10%20bamboo%20connect&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCoQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Faskubuntu.com%2Fquestions%2F80637 %2Fwacom-bamboo-connect-ctl470-no-tablet-detected&ei=fL3pTs_rDbH64QTS4ribCQ&usg=AFQjCNFGjOJ6xhFbCzjLm8x0v43X6hSDXQ&cad=rja) and this (http://askubuntu.com/questions/80793/wacom-bamboo-cth-670-is-not-detected): maybe it works :D
And you can even have a look at what the Archlinux wiki says in the Wacom Tablet page (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Wacom_Tablet)!!!

mörgæs
December 15th, 2011, 11:34 AM
help me with microsoft office 2010...and microsoft visual studio 2010 to be run on linux.......then am done

Have you tried open source alternatives?

Georgescu1
December 15th, 2011, 04:17 PM
i still use windows 7 Ultimate more than Ubuntu , but I loved XP alot when I had a crappy computer.

Ubuntu is good and I’m not saying that just because it’s “free” because my Windows and all the thousands of dollars apps from it are also “free”


Why use Windows?
-games
-applications
-devices
-IM
-why not say it’s alot easyer to use?
Cons:
-BSOD
-errors


Why use Ubuntu?
-stable
(not alot of pros for Ubuntu , at least for what i needed)
Cons:
-interesting to say but even though I always updated to the max and everything , Ubuntu had ALOT more bugs than Windows (unable to log in,bad storage info(shows less space than it’s actually on the HDD)and alot of other bugs , a funny one was once that when I was pressing shut down the computer wasn’t shutting down and I unplugged it)
-doesn’t recognize half of my devices not even my blu-ray but at least my DVD-RW “works"
-Instant messaging services msn,yahoo you name it, they all fail badly on ubuntu
-you need to do 10 operations for a simple outcome that you just double click on Windows
-applications(nothing can replace the windows applications that i needed) and I did spent alot of days trying alot of ubuntu apps to replace those but no...
-network problems


Ubuntu it’s a nice eye candy for the kids out there that want compiz but...
At the end of the day if I want something stable to write something for hours or just to listen to a song or watch a movie,then Ubuntu, for everything else Windows.

peyre
December 15th, 2011, 06:32 PM
I'm pretty much totally linux. I have a virtual machine to run some accounting software for my business but other than that I havent used windows in a while. I'm just waiting for an accounting package for linux to come of age and get a nice easy to use interface. Lots of them out there that have all the features I need but they are a pain in the *** to use compared to quickbooks or peachtree.

Have you tried GnuCash?

----------------------------

Georgescu1, have you tried Pidgin? I have a great IM experience in Ubuntu using that. It's like Trillian--I can have my AOL, Yahoo!Messenger, and MSN Messenger accounts all open at once in the same application.

pingvin
December 15th, 2011, 08:51 PM
Photography kept me dual-booting for a long time, but I have finally switched completely over to Ubuntu, thanks to a wonderful programme called Bibble. It's the only serious RAW converter I've found for Linux, and it's actively developed for Linux, Windows and Mac. Now to think of a purpose for that old NTFS parition... :)

MoonLitOwl
December 15th, 2011, 09:58 PM
Googling now I found this (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=ubuntu%2011.10%20bamboo%20connect&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCoQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Faskubuntu.com%2Fquestions%2F80637 %2Fwacom-bamboo-connect-ctl470-no-tablet-detected&ei=fL3pTs_rDbH64QTS4ribCQ&usg=AFQjCNFGjOJ6xhFbCzjLm8x0v43X6hSDXQ&cad=rja) and this (http://askubuntu.com/questions/80793/wacom-bamboo-cth-670-is-not-detected): maybe it works :D
And you can even have a look at what the Archlinux wiki says in the Wacom Tablet page (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Wacom_Tablet)!!!


Thanks! I'll take a look. :D

light09
December 18th, 2011, 04:13 AM
I recently switched over to Linux so I still have a lot of ties to Windows. I probably will not be cutting off ties to Windows..or at least not anytime soon. Windows is a de-facto around here so I'd like to be able to continue to be familiar with the system and its UI.

statiq77
December 18th, 2011, 07:00 AM
Hi All,
This is my first post on any forum ever. As everyone said: I dual boot ubuntu and windows. I have a M.S. in security and I trust my Linux partition to host a web server but windows would never have such a privilege. Windows is for gaming. I feel like someone needs to make it easier to do dual monitors on Ubuntu though. I think it drives some users away. I have studied "Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment" and taken a class on it. I have also studied the history of Linux as told by Glyn Moody in the book entitled, "Rebel Code." (Great read btw, check it out). Anyway, here is a paper I wrote on why programmers should go open source. i sent it to some programmer friends and it changed their minds. Chick it out. If you guys think it will help your Windows buddies make their way over to the open source revolution please send it to them. Here goes nothing:


Why Should Programmers Join the Open Source Community?
~/statiq77
In today’s world of networked communication, secrecy is no longer feasible for software developers. Although copyrights protect actual source code, ideas and concepts intrinsic in the code’s design are replicable without consequence. For this reason, it is unlikely that a single software developer hold a monopoly on a certain software niche or specific product. In addition to this, open source software has a higher rate of diffusion than proprietary software. Proud programmers tend to want to show off their code and get feedback from peer review to improve their own programming process as well as to get peer recognition. As a programmer myself, I present a case for my peers to join the open source movement and contribute code to the public domain.
In my analysis I include views from two main sources. The first of which is an inspirational work by Glyn Moody entitled, Rebel Code [1]. Moody lays out the history of Linux and the free/open source software movement. He points out why Linux has grown so quickly and explains the movement from the view of the main players contributing to it. The second source is a book called Democratizing Innovation by Eric Von Hippel [2]. In chapter 6 of his book, Hippel concentrates on the reasons why programmers decide to freely reveal their software. These reasons range from reputation-related reasons to the inevitability of future release of similar software. Using these two books as a wealth of information I attempt to make a convincing case that programmers, not unlike me, should join the open source movement.
Traditional capitalist mentality suggests that free sharing of software is counter-productive. Money spent developing it leads to no monetary profit. This point is clearly illustrated in Bill Gates’ “Open letter to Hobbyists” written in 1976 [3]. Gates points out that people who share software freely, “… prevent good software from being written.” On the other hand, after years of further analysis, in 2001, Glyn Moody points out that software developed by the open source community is more stable and better supported than proprietary software [1]. This is partly because the code is developed by proud programmers who want recognition for their work. A second, perhaps more important, reason is that open source software goes through an intense peer review process upon release. The freely distributed source code allows peers to more quickly and accurately evaluate the software. It also means that peers can write their own patches to fix or improve code and distribute them accordingly. One clear example of open source software beating out the competition is the widely used Apache web server.
Mr. Gates had the idea in 1976 that no good programmer would write good code for free. In hindsight we observe that there are in fact many good programmers who share their software with others based on the ideals of free software. Some of the most well-known and inspirational such programmers include Richard Stallman, the father of GNU, and Linus Torvalds, the father of Linux. When Stallman wrote GCC (GNU C Compiler, later changed to GNU Compiler Collection) he decided that it was a useful tool for other hobby programmers. GCC has since become the foundation upon which the open source movement was built. When Linus sat down and wrote the first version of Linux it was just a learning tool he used to increase his understanding of operating systems and the Intel 386 processor [1]. It has grown since then to be a widely used alternative to proprietary operating systems like Microsoft Windows. What possessed Stallman and Linus to share the software they worked so hard on for free? Why not try and sell it for profit?
Many programmers today earn their living doing just that. Most of them work for big companies and have no control over how their code is used. The presence of open source software on the market does not deter companies from using the proprietary software model. In fact some of these companies are based on the idea that the code is their secret. It is not unexpected for a programmer to get a job and earn a salary. At the same time, many programmers have their own projects in the works aside from their paid jobs. These projects may be an effort to make money or just a hobby. It is these background programmers that can make a difference in the way code is treated in the future. A further step programmers can take is to try and get paid jobs at open source support companies or even form their own such companies.
Some see the achievements of Richard Stallman and Linus Torvalds as rebellion against proprietary software, particularly Microsoft. There is a deeper reasoning behind this rebellion that is best understood by programmers but can be related to by artists as well. That reason is pride in one’s work. A painter might continually spend money on paint and canvas even if he or she never sells a painting. The sense of accomplishment and pride felt by the artist is payment enough for the time, effort, and even money spent to create his or her artwork. Well versed programmers look at segments of code as works of art. They can tell when work is sloppy and wasteful as well as when a problem is solved elegantly. Programmers in the open source community take pride in their artwork and publish it to get reviewed and recognized as the most elegant solution available. Programmers with less confidence in their own ability are also welcomed into the community. These fresh blood programmers can learn a lot from reading code that is widely recognized as well written and elegant.
Some programmers think that the only way to profit from writing code is to keep the source classified and sell licenses for use. This may be a viable approach for short term profit. However, in the long run it is not the most profitable decision. On average it takes about 12-18 months for someone to write an alternative version of a new software tool [2]. This means that keeping the code a secret will not last long. Since software is protected under copyright not patents, only the original source is protected, not the concept or methodology behind the code. Because the monopoly is so short lived before another version comes out, the potential for profit from selling licenses is low. A more rational approach for a developer is to make the software open in the first place so that their version is recognized as the standard. Once the software starts to be used money can be made by providing support for the software. The first company to use this business model and make money by supporting open source software started in 1989 and was dubbed Cygnus.
If proprietary programmers made the effort to think about the long term effects of freely releasing software, then they would find more benefits than just recognition and free peer review. First of all, keeping the code secret will not last. Second, more eyes on the code means less chance it will fail. Third, free release of well written code increases the author’s credibility, not only within the programming community, but in the job market as well. Nothing looks better on a resume than authorship of successful software that is widely used and accepted as well written. One might argue that authorship of proprietary software is equally good looking on a resume. That brings up the fourth reason free software is better: The diffusion rate of free software is higher than that of proprietary software [2]. Diffusion rate is the rate at which a piece of software gains user base. That means a programmer is more likely to succeed in authoring code that is widely used if he or she publishes the source code rather than keeping it proprietary.
From the standpoint of an academic, open source software is an invaluable tool for teaching and research. Computer science students can use code repositories to more deeply understand the intricacies of a given task. For example, Professor Alice is teaching a class on operating systems. She can explain virtual memory in the class room a hundred times and students still wouldn’t understand it as well as they would if they were to actually implement it. Windows and Macintosh cringe at allowing users to change key functional parts of the operating system. With an open source operating system in hand, students can not only look at the modules that control virtual memory, they can replace them with their own and see what happens. This hands-on approach allows students to get a deeper understanding of the subject. The same holds true for in depth research that requires changes to the operating system for experimental purposes. It wouldn’t be feasible for every researcher who wants an added feature to write their own operating system that includes it. Open source gives them a starting point to speed up the process.
Giving back to the open source community is a common reason for programmers to release their code. Students, researchers, as well as hobbyists who use the freely available tools and code base are grateful to the community and feel compelled to share their own work for the benefit of the rest of the members. Contributors know that the best way to create solid software is to release the code for peer use and review. Others contribute in an effort to show off their skills and be recognized. Whatever the reason for your contribution, you can be sure that freely releasing your source code is not only worthwhile, but it is also the smartest use of your programming talents. My personal inspiration for contributing to the community is the story of Richard Stallman. He went from being a nobody programmer with untapped skill to becoming a well-respected and widely known computer scientist within a matter of years. With the help of the open source community all programmers now have a chance to make their own similar story by walking the path paved by the fathers of free software.

Note: In this work I use the terms free software and open source software interchangeably. In reality there are several differences between the two schools of thought that are outside the scope of this work. For further information on this subject visit: http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-software-for-freedom.html .
[1] Moody, Glyn. Rebel Code: the inside Story of Linux and the Open Source Revolution. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Pub., 2001. Print.
[2] Hippel, Eric Von. "Chapter 6: Why Users Often Freely Reveal Their Innovations." Democratizing Innovation. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2005. 77-89. Print.
[3] Gates, William H. "Open Letter to Hobbyists." Letter. 3 Feb. 1976. Blinkenlights Archaeological Institute. Web. 03 Dec. 2011. <http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/gateswhine.html>.

phillat5dock
December 20th, 2011, 08:06 AM
I have an iMac 27in which I just love.

My primary OS of choice is Mac OS X, but I have installed Windows 7 in a bootcamp partition. I don't use Windows for everyday taks. I installed it because I have some GPS devices and other things like mobile phones for which there is little Mac software. In particular I have a Magellan Explorist which has maps on a memory card. To view the maps I have to use Magellan's Vantage Point software. There in no Mac (or Gnu Linux) software available which will do this.

I recently watched a friend use his Asus iPad lookalike and it was running Android and I was blown away. I had a look at Android and installed it on my Eee PC netbook but eventually gave it away for the same reason that I gave up trying to run Snow Leopard on the netbook.

Now the Eee PC has this fast boot thing called Express Gate which quickly boots a squash version of Linux. So I decided, after I had wiped Android off the netbook partition to have a look at Ubuntu. 11.04. Ubuntu on the netbook just blows Windows 7 out of the water and half way to Mars! I was so impressed I then investigated running Ubuntu on my Mac so I could learn the OS with the advantage of the huge screen.

Well after a few setbacks and reinstalls I have Ubuntu 11.10 Oneric running quite stably on my iMac and I am very, very impressed. I doubt I will stop using OS X, but the more I learn about Ubuntu/Gnu Linux and the community effort the more impressed I am.

So here's to you Ubuntu.

rmcellig
December 20th, 2011, 11:26 AM
I too have an iMac 24" and loved it until I discovered Linux. Now I use my iMac about 10% and use carols Linux distros (my current fav is ultimate edition 3 and puppy Linux 5.2.8.

I love the flexibility and possibilities of Linux that I don't get with mac and windows. Plus you don't have to spend a ton of money. I love Linux!!

krishna.988
December 20th, 2011, 01:06 PM
Windows:

1. Run Adobe Products.
2. Run many Games.
3. Most of the Phones and other peripherals comes with Windows software are compatible.
4. Run Standard Messengers from Yahoo, MSN, Google, SKYPE (latest version) etc..
5. Lots of other softwares.

This list is not complete....


Ubuntu (Linux):

Though alternatives exist for the above its not in par...

Always have to spend time in figuring out workarounds on how to get things done in Ubuntu.

diversecg
December 20th, 2011, 04:03 PM
I have used linux for over 10 years for various servers and distributions (even custom via LFS), I have been using Ubuntu exclusively for servers and workstations for past 2 years, and switching completely away from winblows is the best thing I ever did. I only ever had 1 software that I had to open my XP virtual machine in VirtualBox (which runs faster virtualized than on bare metal), which was QuickBooks, which I finally replaced with OpenERP

Ubuntu may have it's quirks, but it is leaps and bounds better than windows, you don't have forced anti-virus, and many applications in windows have equivalent if not better applications already available in the software repos, which is also the great, a single point for software updates

I am a small business owner, and amazed how well Ubuntu works for the workstation

MasterNetra
December 20th, 2011, 06:11 PM
I am amazed this thread is still alive, this must be the longest lasting thread in ubuntuforums if not the internet...

emmomalick
December 20th, 2011, 06:16 PM
Started using Ubuntu in almost 2008 but a newbie to Ubuntu Forums :) & now completely switched to Ubuntu. Its Great. :D

jonathonblake
December 21st, 2011, 10:23 PM
this must be the longest lasting thread in ubuntuforums if not the internet...

This thread celebrated its 7th anniversary on the second.

There were a couple of threads on FidoNet echos and in the alt.newsgroups that lasted more than a decade. On Yahoogroups, there are a couple of groups that have threads that are in their teens.

jonathon

VietCanada
December 24th, 2011, 12:39 PM
I installed Ubuntu Karmic Koala then Lucid when it came out and never looked back. I have Win 7 on my machine so my wife can use Yahoo messenger. I boot to it once in awhile to spend an afternoon updating it and all the required security. But I use 10.10 now for everything. I use Wine to play CIV IV BTS. I can't imagine ever taking out a mortgage for an OS or any other software ever again.

Yes there are problems from time to time but there were problems from time to time with Windows as well. This board provides better support than MS ever did for me. I've also had problems with hardware. You change something and you simply exchange one set of problems for another.

marl30
December 24th, 2011, 05:32 PM
I have been so impressed with the recent improvement in Kubuntu 11.10 brought about after upgrading to KDE 4.7.4, I formated my hard drive, which had a Windows 7 partition, and went back to Linux full time. What also helped my decision was the fact that I found a work around for GTK3 integration, as I rely on a few GTK applications. I had been disappointed with Ubuntu 11.10, not because of Unity, but because of the performance, especially 3D gaming. Kubuntu little quirks also didn't convince me either, though it had been out performing Ununtu since 11.04 on my computer. However, it still ran my games as smoothly as in Windows, so as soon as the bugs I had issues with were fixed, I was delighted to ditch Windows yet again. Kubuntu 11.10 with KDE 4.7.4 is just awesome! It certainly restored my Linux passion. :)

peyre
December 25th, 2011, 12:14 AM
I have Win 7 on my machine so my wife can use Yahoo messenger.

I use Pidgin to access my Yahoo Messenger account. It works great.

gleedadswell
December 25th, 2011, 03:19 AM
Almost...

The computer on my desk at work still runs Windows (XP) because that's what my employer's Computer Services department will support. My laptop (technically also owned by work) is dual boot, but I *never* boot it into Windows. The home computer is Linux only. Why do I still use Windows at all?

1. Support from Computer Services at work. But increasingly I can fix things faster myself (and have fewer things to fix...) running Linux than waiting for Computer Services to get around to it.

2. My printer on my desk at work (a Brother printer/scanner) has been hard to get working with Linux. But I've never failed to get it working whenever I've tried and it gets easier every time.

3. Compatibility when trading Office files back and forth with coworkers. But Libre Office keeps getting better and better at producing files that swap back and forth effortlessly with MS Office. At this point simple documents in Writer and Calc go back and forth perfectly except for occasional font difficulties and equations in Word documents. I find Impress is slightly less seamless in trading back and forth with PowerPoint, but it's not bad.

4. *One* program that I *need* in my work that only runs under Windows. I'd love to just run it under wine, but it needs to talk to devices on the usb ports and I can't seem to be able to get it to do that while running under wine.

So...the days of Windows in my life are very limited, because I hate it. If that one program would just talk to the usb ports under wine then I'd totally ditch Windows and never look back.

Beast2234
December 25th, 2011, 04:13 AM
I made the switch to Linux when I was 10, 5 years ago. That was a Puppy Linux / Arch Linux dual-boot on an originally Windows 98 computer I stole from my dad. Not the best performance, but it was still better than any Windows OS. Since then I have kept a minimal partition for Windows on other computers, and now My Google Cr-48 is running Ubuntu 11.10 from the SSD and Android Honeycomb from an SD card. I'm getting a touchscreen for it so Android will be legit. I never use Windows anymore, except for the ****** bogged down version we use at my school...:roll:

mamamia88
December 25th, 2011, 03:28 PM
I was dualbooting with windows 7 until last night. I installed xfce in addition to unity and liked it so much I wanted pure xubuntu so installed that and deleted my windows partition. Just graduated college so don't see myself needing office anymore which was my only real hangup. One of my 2012 new years resolutions though is to build a gaming rig

josephmills
December 25th, 2011, 03:40 PM
I wish that I could rock 100% *nix but that is not going to happen. Work gets in the way . Here are some of the things that I have to use windoz for.
1) a auto dailer this is used for the sales team at work and it only works on doz it uses sip to connect. if anyone knows of something else please pm me thanks

2) we use mssql at work so I can not connect to the data banks well kinda I have connected with Mono but have massive troubles droping and inserting tables and columns

3) We use asp and asp.net at work mono has worked all right for the hand coding part but as far as compared to visual studio .....

4)We have a cms that is only windows based I have got it to rum but it is not running right. ie. when clicking on links to open page sometimes it just dl the page instead of showing it in a browser.

all in all I would have to say that I wish that I coulds use *nix all day long but the usability of some of the programs makes this hard for me. once there is a massive step either with mono or some sort of IDE I am afraid that i am still going to have to use windows. as far as at home all 5 of my servers are running *nix all my personal computer DO NOT have doz on them in fact. The only windoz that is in my house s on my gf computer (dual boot with 11.10 ) and that is because see has a windows based phone that only works with zune.

micxploed
December 25th, 2011, 04:56 PM
I was forced to use Ubuntu when I tried to install Zorin os 5 and run it along Windows 7. I ended up erasing my hard drive and Windows at the same time. So I was stuck with Zorin and found Ubuntu later as I was searching for the most popular Linux based OS. INSTALLED! See you later Windows! XD

djbon2112
December 25th, 2011, 11:18 PM
Myself.

I was all Linux back in 2008-2009, then I went to Windows 7 because it was awesome. But now I'm back on Ubuntu entirely on my desktop; the games I play work fine in Wine and I used almost all OSS programs on Windows anyways,

GuiGuy
December 26th, 2011, 02:54 AM
I thought I was there but I find myself drifting back to Windows (7). The main reason is that the software we need just isn't available or, when it is, it just isn't good enough to be useful.

My partner, who had been using Ubuntu for four or so years has just gone back to Windows because there is no easy way to connect her new Nexus phone to her Ubuntu based PC. She complains there is no equivalent for Samsung Kies either.

Only our file server and mythtv backend remains pure. Maybe that's all ubuntu/ linux is good at; the grunt stuff. I have to concede that it fails the desktop test. :(

CHeers

lux11
December 27th, 2011, 12:53 AM
I have been making a transition to Linux for my home computers during the past year. Currently using Ubuntu 11.10 on two machines and windows xp on others. If I can find a good quicken equivalent to run in Linux I'll convert one more of the xp machines immediately. Eventually, I'll be windoz free.

mörgæs
December 27th, 2011, 02:28 AM
Have you tried Gnucash?

GhostOfTomJoad
December 27th, 2011, 02:46 AM
I still have the option to boot to vista but haven't for a few years now. I keep it around in case I get slap happy and break something beyond repair. That way I still have the windows boot-loader to reinstall some flavor of Linux.

For gaming, I mostly play snes, nes, and n64 roms but wine seems to play well with everything else.

yugnip
December 31st, 2011, 07:40 PM
I pretty much use linux full-time, but a few things make me keep mac around: Netflix and Max/msp. I realize I will get stoned for the Netflix mention, but it is what it is. And I know there is PureData, a good substitute for Max/msp, but I can't yet get my head around it.

vpharry
December 31st, 2011, 08:13 PM
I completely use Ubuntu. I keep Windows around for gaming problems (to test if they work in Windows, basically, then boot into Ubuntu and fix (or try to fix) the problem). I haven't "used" Windows in a long time, but it's still there.
I am doing exactly the same thing:lolflag:

sprog
December 31st, 2011, 09:29 PM
-Home in 2004.
-Local school in ~2006, first school in NZ 100% OSS.
-At work, starting in 1999, 20/30 servers, 100/100 of thin clients, 0/5 terminal servers, 0/70 fat clients.

sammiev
December 31st, 2011, 09:42 PM
Been using Ubuntu for many months now but still have my Windows7 for backup. I can say I'm Windows free, but not till I delete it.

installman
January 1st, 2012, 01:25 AM
I built a new system back in june that has never run anything but ubuntu, and just built one for the kids that is only running ubuntu. I can't see paying $100 for windows and then paying for anti virus and slowing the system down and end up having problems anyway.

syerges
January 1st, 2012, 02:43 AM
I recently completely switched to Linux through Ubuntu after my wife downloaded another game that had a million viruses on it. I couldn't take the virus factor of Windows anymore so I switched.... Shortly after, Microsoft upgraded XBOX 360 to require that you are running Windows Media Player 11 and upgraded Windows Media Player on version 11 so that it only installs if you are running Windows. That is my final straw with Microsoft! They always make something OK and then rather then improving it, screw it up more! Switch to Linux but keep your Windows OS so you can see how much money you are having to shell out for Microsoft games. Once you get sick from it, switch completely... anyone want a free XBOX 360?

appy22
January 1st, 2012, 03:46 AM
Trying very hard, i want to move my wubi install (using it since 2 yrs) to a separate partition and get rid of windows and maybe use windows partition for testing purposes

TheNerdAL
January 1st, 2012, 04:24 AM
I recently completely switched to Linux through Ubuntu after my wife downloaded another game that had a million viruses on it. I couldn't take the virus factor of Windows anymore so I switched.... Shortly after, Microsoft upgraded XBOX 360 to require that you are running Windows Media Player 11 and upgraded Windows Media Player on version 11 so that it only installs if you are running Windows. That is my final straw with Microsoft! They always make something OK and then rather then improving it, screw it up more! Switch to Linux but keep your Windows OS so you can see how much money you are having to shell out for Microsoft games. Once you get sick from it, switch completely... anyone want a free XBOX 360?

I'd like a free Xbox. :D

Momof9Blessings
January 4th, 2012, 12:08 AM
A few weeks ago when I was looking into linux - Ubuntu 11.10 - I made a list of all the application types I needed.....

My #1 is Photoshop.... I tried GIMP - not bad, but it did not do some things very easily that I need to do all the time.... So I decided to try again with WINE.... Last night I found some threads about Wine and CS5 (I have the trial version so I will need to upgrade from CS3) - today I got it to work!!! I will take any of the quirks any day....

Yesterday I had to go into Windows to get some files for CS5 - and it was almost a nightmare.... I DO NOT like windows - what a chore....

I even found myself trying to close things, etc like in Ubuntu.... LOL

I may hold off a bit before I delete Windows - but I doubt I will be needing it anymore.... :) woohoo Thank you for Ubuntu!!!

russellkanning
January 4th, 2012, 01:58 AM
I have only used Linux for a few years now.

mamamia88
January 4th, 2012, 03:15 AM
I recently completely switched to Linux through Ubuntu after my wife downloaded another game that had a million viruses on it. I couldn't take the virus factor of Windows anymore so I switched.... Shortly after, Microsoft upgraded XBOX 360 to require that you are running Windows Media Player 11 and upgraded Windows Media Player on version 11 so that it only installs if you are running Windows. That is my final straw with Microsoft! They always make something OK and then rather then improving it, screw it up more! Switch to Linux but keep your Windows OS so you can see how much money you are having to shell out for Microsoft games. Once you get sick from it, switch completely... anyone want a free XBOX 360?i'm sure you can do it without wmp. you could before the update so i'm pretty sure you still can. just google streaming ubuntu xbox 360 and you'll find tons of responses. I personally don't use that feature of the 360 because i can always use one of the flash drives/external harddrives i have lying around to play them on my 360 but i just use my mp3 player with headphones anyway if i want to listen to music while gaming

kazuya
January 4th, 2012, 04:41 AM
I have exclusively been on linux since 2005 till present. It was an easy logical switch after simply getting sick of the virus and mal-ware plaque on my windows XP machine then.

I not only run linux,, I advocate it and give support as required for those around me. Almost all of my immediate family members runs some flavor of an Ubuntu-derivative OS on their PCs or laptops.

Myself, I admire Ubuntu and its derivatives. Archbang linux has been my distro of choice for a year plus now.

It would be too difficult for me to use any other OS besides linux. Windows (gaming purpose only, too unsafe and tedious to manage) Mac OS (very nice, but I need more control and customization)

Linux (Just works for me, more power, control, easier to manage, super stable, super customizable)

ernestj
January 4th, 2012, 05:34 AM
I still dual boot, but I have not been on my windows partition in over 6 months. I have no use for it and frankly, I do not like windows. I have tried several Linux distros, but I have fallen head over heals for Xubuntu. When I last went into my windows partition, I crashed windows cause i was clicking buttons so fast, like I do in Xubuntu. Xubuntu responds, windows crashes. I was sooooo sick of seeing that little blue circle spinning and spinning. I go to online University, and i was so nervous that I would have to access the school and do my work in Windows. The good news is that I am in Linux and there is no problem with school. :D

the_fat_man
January 6th, 2012, 03:52 PM
I have used linux exclusively for 5 years in an office environment with a Windows server and 9 other Windows clients, and Ubuntu has done everything that the old XP box I took out could do. And by do, I mean do it faster, more safely and more efficiently than every other client on my network. It is connected to the file server, uses the network printer, and runs the necessary office programs flawlessly. I keep a Windows box around, however, but mostly just to stick post-it notes on. ;)

chrinabuntu
January 7th, 2012, 11:56 AM
I want to not have to dual-boot at all, but I just find myself hanging onto Windows mainly for my beloved PhotoShop. I try & try GIMP and I just can't deal. I am so used to PhotoShop, I find myself lost in GIMP. I have also tried using PS under WINE, but it's still not the same. I hate that it's the only reason I hang onto it...but I use it enough that it makes it a necessity. If only I could just install it like anything else...it would be OVER WITH!

It was always actually for what I referred to as the Big 3, PhotoShop, DreamWeaver, and Flash...but I honestly just haven't used the other 2 in a while. I still use it to justify it tho...if I ever DO decide to do something in those again...break out a new project...I need Windows to do it. The Linux versions of those are just not the same...or else I don't know of suitable replacements. It keeps me stuck. But I really do hate it...I want to be completely Windows-free!!!

**I don't really understand Virtual Machine at this point...but it has been mentioned to me. If I can take the time to learn what this is all about...I may be free!

SamTzu
January 7th, 2012, 01:33 PM
Since I don't play Computer Games anymore there was little to hold me back to Windows. So... I went totally Linux about 5 years ago. I'm pretty happy with that decision but I still have some complaints with printers (and especially the default locale/units settings suck with most Linuxes versions if you want to use English language but do not live in US) but all in all I have not looked back.

Most internet servers are Linux servers and since most of my work is internet related it really is the only sensible solution.

Windows (and Mac) are all about "limits that WE don't want you to break (unless you pay us first)" while Linux is all about "there are no limits! We don't care what you want to do with your computer."

That should pretty much say it all. If you want freedom the choice is clear. If you want to stay "limited" you pay for your OS.

Hoeker
January 7th, 2012, 01:38 PM
I use lubuntu on my netbook, but have a dual boot with W7, have a few programs that i cant live without, on my main computer, an imac i run OSX. So far from completely :p

Azyx
January 7th, 2012, 01:49 PM
I still dual boot, but I have not been on my windows partition in over 6 months. I have no use for it and frankly, I do not like windows. I have tried several Linux distros, but I have fallen head over heals for Xubuntu. When I last went into my windows partition, I crashed windows cause i was clicking buttons so fast, like I do in Xubuntu. Xubuntu responds, windows crashes. I was sooooo sick of seeing that little blue circle spinning and spinning. I go to online University, and i was so nervous that I would have to access the school and do my work in Windows. The good news is that I am in Linux and there is no problem with school. :D

Have you tried gimpshop http://gimpshop.com/? or virtualbox and windows+photoshop?

/Cheers

coldte
January 7th, 2012, 02:47 PM
hi all ,as silver surfer i changed to ubuntu 11.10 several weeks ago with no experience and despite being in late sixties ,to say it is a steep learning curve was/is an understatement.reason - a new challenge and i liked the camaraderie in the forums.
Biggest problem so far -getting two pcs to connect to each other and connect them to Internet , took nearly 3 days,solution-run live cd and ubuntu did the rest .
regards
coldte

peyre
January 7th, 2012, 09:55 PM
hi all ,as silver surfer i changed to ubuntu 11.10 several weeks ago with no experience and despite being in late sixties ,to say it is a steep learning curve was/is an understatement.reason - a new challenge and i liked the camaraderie in the forums.
Biggest problem so far -getting two pcs to connect to each other and connect them to Internet , took nearly 3 days,solution-run live cd and ubuntu did the rest .
regards
coldte

Welcome aboard, coldte! I switched over about 3 years ago myself, and I've stuck with it largely for the same reasons you started: the community and the challenge of it. I also wanted to get away from Windows--I always felt...vulnerable somehow, being completely dependent on a proprietary operating system.

Of course, I still often grumble to myself about how everything's harder to do in Linux than Windows--but that's an overstatement, since some things are actually easier. Some things are equally hard or easy in either of course--of those that aren't, I'd say for me about 1/3 is easier in Linux, and 2/3 easier in Windows (probably because I'm more used to Windows).

sammiev
January 7th, 2012, 10:01 PM
Deleted post because of error.

sammiev
January 7th, 2012, 10:02 PM
so error. deleted post.

cl17g
January 9th, 2012, 10:02 AM
I'm not using Windows since a few years ago. I use Ubuntu all the time, although I find 11.10 to be a bad step back in performance and usability. Very fancy but useless. Some examples? Things are difficult to find, proxy settings disappeared, a huge amount of memory used just for the desktop... Isn't it enough?

mörgæs
January 9th, 2012, 11:12 AM
Have you tried Xubuntu?

oldrocker99
January 9th, 2012, 03:52 PM
I have been using GNU/Linux since 8.04 Hardy Heron. Yes, Ubuntu has caused me to pull my few remaining hairs out on occasion. Yes, I dual boot so I can play the games Windows 7 LETS me play. Yes, I hate Unity and GNOME 3, so I run Linux Mint so I have MATE and Cinnamon. Yes, I usually use XFCE. But that's the FREEDOM of GNU/Linux. If one distro doesn't do it for you, try another (having your /home on its own partition makes this a snap). If you don't like the interface, install another; you're bound to find one you are confortable with.

Someone mentioned his love of Photoshop. I have it installed on my Windows partition. I was editing some large scanned images. Photoshop simply couldn't open them (not enough memory). I rebooted into Mint, and opened and edited them successfully with GIMP, which may have a steeper learning curve, but it did the job when Photoshop couldn't.

Microsoft and third-party programmers are fewer in number than open source programmers. A malicious coder may slip a back door into an executable, and, in Windows, that coder will be the only one who knows about it. An open source coder would have to hide a back door in PLAIN SIGHT, and (it is guaranteed) it WILL be spotted by another programmer. There is a peer reviewing aspect to open source programming that is simply nonexistent in the closed-source world.

By the way, my PC runs Windows 7 about 10% of the time, and GNU/Linux 90% of the time. Aside from certain games, GNU/Linux allows me to do EVERYTHING I want to do ith my computer, and it's MUCH more fun than Windows; as I tell people, the more you know about computers, the better you'll like GNU/Linux.

techvish81
January 9th, 2012, 04:56 PM
i've used ubuntu linux since version 10.04 but that was a dual boot with xp, then it was dual boot with win7 and now from 11.04 i'm completely on linux (ubuntu), actually thanks to ubuntu for freeing me up from windows dependence ..

cl17g
January 9th, 2012, 05:49 PM
Have you tried Xubuntu?

I found a good compromise with Ubuntu + Xfce. However, this seems to work with my 32-bit laptop, but not with my 64-bit home computer. Or, at least, I could not find 64-bit Xfce.

peyre
January 9th, 2012, 08:00 PM
I found a good compromise with Ubuntu + Xfce. However, this seems to work with my 32-bit laptop, but not with my 64-bit home computer. Or, at least, I could not find 64-bit Xfce.

I think you can get it here: http://download.cnet.com/Xubuntu-64-bit/3000-18513_4-75312545.html

airplanesimen
January 11th, 2012, 08:15 PM
i did delete windows yesterday, dont need it, i have everything i need in ubuntu now :P so, i did change completely :P

bse1963
January 12th, 2012, 05:34 AM
Ubuntu 11.10 only OS on my laptop. Desktop has Windows for Autocad.

Azyx
January 12th, 2012, 05:43 AM
I'm not using Windows since a few years ago. I use Ubuntu all the time, although I find 11.10 to be a bad step back in performance and usability. Very fancy but useless. Some examples? Things are difficult to find, proxy settings disappeared, a huge amount of memory used just for the desktop... Isn't it enough?

I agree what it's bad with the power consuption with unity. Have you tried 2D?

archolman
January 15th, 2012, 05:19 PM
The only thing I keep XP for is all the expensive audio software, (e.g. Pro-Tools, Reason, CoolEdit Pro, NI synths, etc, I bought before Linux was matured to the point of being a usable DAW) & the full support for my M-Audio soundcard that it has. I do use Audacity as my recording device.

Otherwise, I use Ubuntu for everything else... including recording instruments (Audacity, limited M-Audio card) & very rarely connect XP to the net! I don't care about games, but GNU/Linux support is getting much better for that anyway according to Linux Format.

When I can get a port to GNU/Linux for all of my studio stuff, (any good hackers out there who like old audio software?) I will delete XP, & good riddance!

jeliocranch
January 15th, 2012, 06:02 PM
I started with 9.04 dual booting with Win 7. I first looked at Linux after getting tired of paying for software (I'm a bit of a cheapskate).
Linux became more and more my goto OS, now its definitely the alpha OS. I have xp, vista and win 7 as vm's for training and visual studio (some classes require it).
Now I'm a bit of a polyglotist, and I've tried many flavors of Linux, but Ubuntu has the best support and most active forums, so I come back again and again.

deeperDATA
January 15th, 2012, 07:44 PM
Switched but running Windows 7 x64 in VirtualBox for Adobe products and to run a few random proprietary programs for tech support. Hoping to switch over to more Linux development later this year to try and give back to the community.

carl4926
January 15th, 2012, 07:53 PM
Linux only user

Windows is installed for testing multi-boot only

RichardUK
January 15th, 2012, 11:59 PM
Been 100% Linux for about eight months now at home, Windows XP virtual PC when I need to do .net work stuff at home. But as I've been doing Android and Linux stuff at work it's not been run for months now. At work been on Linux for about six months, moved the Win7 licence on the work dell PC to a virtual PC on the same system so as at home, when I need to do .net jobs I run that up.

Spend most of my day on Linux box's these days so feeling very lucky. :) Also ditched my iPhone for an Android phone, so even got Linux in my pocket.

"Hello, is that Linux in your pocket or are you just pleased to see me?" LoL.....:D

peyre
January 16th, 2012, 02:37 AM
"Hello, is that Linux in your pocket or are you just pleased to see me?" LoL.....:D

HAHAHA!! I should've thought of that one. I'll have to use it with the wife.

Wug
January 16th, 2012, 07:31 AM
I almost did accidentally. I didnt really set out to do it, but ended up using linux exclusively for about 4 months. I ended up missing some of my games and went back for a while :P

youWho
January 16th, 2012, 01:15 PM
Pure. Ubuntu Studio.

[Actually I should edit to say that I might be forced to boot into WIndows (which I was forced to buy) in order to get the pictures off of an old Nokia phone. But that's all.
If anybody has any tips about getting pictures off of an ancient phone... ;-)
When I bought the computer it came with Windows so I thought I'd keep that boot option, just to try WIndows sometime. I've literally never used it.]

WinuxUser
January 16th, 2012, 01:27 PM
had i found a software as enriched with features as visual studio, i would have already switched to ubuntu. Cheers.

Regards,WinuxUser

Owen r
January 16th, 2012, 03:02 PM
Not yet, the final thing holding me back is Napster. I suppose I could try a virtual instance of windows to contain Napster for when its needed - but then I imagine I'd need to buy another license & I don't know if I can justify that atm.

saneearth
January 16th, 2012, 03:29 PM
I use 11.10 almost exclusively at home. I do work in a Windows environment in tech support, so can't get away from it there. Probably the biggest factors that keep me on Linux at home are speed, security and freedom. I am not a Windows basher, but I hate all of the licensing and security issues and relative responsiveness.

Scott Baker
January 18th, 2012, 04:41 PM
I personally have been running just penguin power since the days of Hardy. Have not missed Windoze at all. Finally got my wife to see the light last year, when her Vista installation violently barfed up its guts. I installed Edubuntu on her hard drive ( We multi-boot to 2 Hdds ), installed the few extra items that she required to operate her business ( DVD playback, Skype, etc ). Not only has she been EXTREMELY happy with it, but several of her clients ( she runs a daycare center ) have had me install Ubuntu or Edubuntu on their machines!! You have to LOVE when comp users finally see the light!! \\:D/

Jieldr
January 23rd, 2012, 02:37 AM
I kept Windows, though it lags a lot. I never even use Windows anymore, not even to play games.
I just keep it there "just in case". Never going to happen. When I get another laptop, maybe this year or next year, I'll try to remove Windows. All I hope is that Spore (game by Maxis and EA) will work on it using Wine. I did try to see if Spore worked on Ubuntu, but it froze. Either there's not enough space, the graphics card couldn't handle it, or some other third thing. I run Ubuntu on an MSi Wind U1000, by the way.

canhoto
January 23rd, 2012, 04:12 AM
If I was a Windows user I would surely have moved to Ubuntu a long time ago...

I've been a Mac user for years. I have two computers: a Power Mac G4 and a Macbook. In the Power Mac I've been using Ubuntu regularly for months now. I'm thinking of deleting or reducing the installed Mac Os size. I don't use it anymore.

There was something I missed from the Mac: an outliner like OmniOutliner. But now, I found Loosestitch (http://loosestitch.com), which makes all that I would do with OmniOutliner.

So, I don't miss anything important on the Mac. Ubuntu is better than Mac OS. Maybe not so readily-perfect, but you can do what yow want with it. With much less money. For the same hardware, it's incrdeibly faster. I run Mac Os 10.5.8 and the heaviest flavour if Ubuntu - Kubuntu - and guess which one is faster? Kubuntu, of course. And I'm talking about Apple's own machine!

So, I switched completely to Linux on my desktop computer. I'll keep Mac OS on my Macbook. At least until Apple begins telling me that my Macbook is prehistoric and that I should upgrade to their latest expensive machine. Then, I will switch to Linux on all my computers.

michelepolo
January 24th, 2012, 06:08 PM
Started with Red Hat 6.0! and it was a kind of journey into unknown kingdoms. years after anaconda (the installer) still was the same.
Suse from 6.3, when you had to pay for it, but managed to get it thru magazines.
Ubuntu since 6.06, and let's say it, 11.04 and 11.10 desktop really sucks. I'm looking for an alternative to unity, right now I was looking into forums pages.
my government wants me to pay taxes with M$ o Osx only, maybe that's why so many italians do not pay taxes :confused: :confused: :confused:

stuartcnz
January 24th, 2012, 06:11 PM
I'm finding xfce to be a good replacement to gnome3/unity. Much closer to gnome2.

peyre
January 24th, 2012, 06:26 PM
Ubuntu since 6.06, and let's say it, 11.04 and 11.10 desktop really sucks. I'm looking for an alternative to unity, right now I was looking into forums pages.

There are plenty of alternatives within the Ubuntu family. None of the derivatives has Unity, and it can even be turned off in mainline Ubuntu.

chrykes
January 26th, 2012, 11:04 AM
Many Many thanks to all the Ubuntu developers and Canonical.


Ubuntu sent me a free cd of 9.04, which I dual booted with windows until 10.04, at which time I removed windows with relish. Now using 11.10 only and still loving it.

Thanks also to William Shotts and "The linux command line".
Great book for new linux users.
I feel like I'm ten again and playing around with a zx81and BASIC, only with no limits.

internetprofiles1
January 26th, 2012, 11:49 AM
Been using Ubuntu only 6 months, had some issues, ALL were resolved via this forum. Its a learning curve, now I help people, its really not that hard to figure out things. It can do anything windows can. I'm a big gamer, but playing pc games are so 1990's lol... that's what xbox 360 and wii are for, i own both, dont need to sit at a pc playing games. I'm using 8.04 because its the only version that is compatible with my college classes java applet. 11.10 also worked fine, just the java issue with my classes. I had virtual box for windows, I dumped that too.I do not need windows. I do not miss windows. Now I can just buy a barebone pc for 300 bucks and I dont have to spend 300 bucks for an operating system.

RangerRay
January 26th, 2012, 12:35 PM
I've had windows for many years, until about a month and a half ago. I was introduced to to Ubuntu where

I live. My Windows XP operating system got a virus, I called Microsoft to see if I could fix the problem. I

thought it was Microsoft, it was a company in Texas, I gave permission into my system, collecting

information, instead of fixing the problem. So, luckily I had two computers. I put that computer away, and

started using my alternate computer with Windows Vista. A week later, a virus, for about a month I used

that computer with the virus, until I got feed up with the virus activities. SO now , i have a third computer,

with Windows XP with Support package 3, not three day later, I have a virus.. This a Dell Dimension 2400,

I have to go to Dell Support for a Intel Audio and Video drivers, I got the Virus from Dell Supports

Download. I've had this Virus for about two months. Everyday, trying to find ways to get it out. I went to

Microsoft support, spoke to everyone except the department that could help me. I still have the virus, last

week I called Dell Support, because thats when I realized that the virus was from them. I asked them to

please issue me a new service tag number, because as long as i have this tag number, the virus can hide

in my remote storage, dll, and find me anytime it wants to. Plus, I would need a new service tag number

because I can't flash my BIOS, because my service tag number states I no updated drivers, which I

know their are. My BIOS is A0.05, when I should be at A0.09. So, now I'm using Ubuntu, but I still have the

same problem. I think its a virus, but I really think its a hacker. Because when i get close to exposing it, it

prevents me from doing so, either by turning off and on my screen, when i try to download detection, anti

virus, anti malware, it prevents me from doing so. Another reason, I manipulate the system, to see what it

will do, as soon as i manipulate the system, it counters me ,so whoever it is, their company operates

24hrs. Once I get this Virus out? I'm sticking with Ubuntu. Oh yeah, every time i try to print the 200 plus

installation guide for Ubuntu, it will print the first page, and then after that combinations of alphabets from

different languages.

Welly Wu
January 28th, 2012, 01:14 PM
A little over two weeks ago, I completely switched to Ubuntu 64 bit GNU/Linux from Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit. The Reliability Monitor told me that my previous operating system scored a 1 out of 10 on the reliability and stability index. I own an ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC with Crucial 8 gigabytes of DDR3 1,066 MHz SDRAM and an Intel 2nd Generation 34nm MLC NAND FLASH X25-M 160 gigabyte Solid State Drive. I got annoyed and tired with the fact that I needed to re-install Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit from scratch at least once per year to keep it fresh. I also got tired of the fact that it would slowly deteriorate in terms of stability, reliability, and performance over time no matter how much specialized 3rd party software applications that I purchased to keep it running smoothly. Previously, Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit kept locking up and freezing randomly every 60 seconds on a fresh installation less than 9 months old. I could not use my computer anymore. I was worried about causing permanent damage to my expensive computer hardware and accessories by cutting the power to my laptop constantly in order to do a cold boot. Microsoft Windows Explorer kept freezing or locking up or it would abruptly stop responding which caused lots of problems for me. I literally ran out of money to buy more specialized 3rd party software applications to try and discover and fix Windows problems all of the time.

I had to make a drastic decision. I remembered installing and using Ubuntu 9.04 64 bit on my ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC when I first purchased it in late August 2010. I had not tried any major GNU/Linux distribution in a few years and my skills and knowledge had deprecated quite considerably. I did not want to re-install Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit and all of my software applications from scratch because I knew that I would make mistakes in the process of reloading my software and I would be facing the same stability and reliability problems in a few more months. I decided to download Ubuntu 10.04 64 bit LTS .ISO file and I burned it onto a blank CD-R. I decided to install Ubuntu 10.04.3 64 bit LTS on my ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC. It worked, but not all of my hardware devices worked right out of the box. So, I decided to upgrade to the latest current stable version which is Ubuntu 11.10 64 bit. I wound up reading more information about the Bumblebee Project and I installed the PPA. Now, all of my hardware devices and electronics accessories work right out of the box with Ubuntu 11.10 64 bit.

Ubuntu 64 bit is extremely secure, stable, reliable, and it performs at a very high level. I can now read and write e-mail messages, surf the Internet, copy CDs and DVD-Videos that I purchased onto my Seagate FreeAgent Desk 1.5 terabyte external hard disk drive with USB 2, and listen to music and watch movies on my ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC. I recently paid for the Fluendo Complete Playback codecs and DVD-Video Movie Player through the Canonical Software Center and it has been a worthwhile purchase because I have some DVD-Videos that I purchased which are not coded for Region 1. I setup a custom installation with full disk encryption using LUKS/LVM (AES-CBC mode 256 bits SHA-512 hash algorithm) and I use TrueCrypt (AES-XTS mode 256 bits SHA-512 hash algorithm) to secure all of my data on my Seagate hard drive and my Kingston DataTraveler HyperX 128 gigabyte Super Speed USB 3 thumb drive. Everything is using the /ext4 file system and I can write data in excess of the 4 gigabyte file size limit.

Bumblebee works. I can use my Nvidia GeForce GT 325M GPU to activate using Google Chrome for super fast 3D graphics accelerated web browsing. Most of the time, it is not necessary. I am looking forward to future improvements and refinements to the Bumblebee project and I hope that the Ubuntu and overall GNU/Linux community will be able to utilize the Nvidia Optimus technology as it works with Microsoft Windows 7 with seamless graphics switching capabilities. It is definitely making significant improvements with each new release.

I love Ubuntu! It has saved me quite a bit of time and money already. Ubuntu is much faster than Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit and it is far superior in terms of security, stability, and reliability along with cost.

I do not expect to purchase my next computer with Microsoft Windows pre-installed. I am going to buy a top of the line System76 Bonobo Professional by April 2014 when Ubuntu 14.04 64 bit LTS is released.

I look forward to upgrading to the latest stable version of Ubuntu 64 bit every six months without having the need to re-install everything from scratch. It is a seamless and painless upgrade process that only takes up to one hour (usually it is much faster) and one single reboot.

I also like the fact that I am now an Ubuntu user and GNU/Linux fan for the rest of my life. Whenever I bring my ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC and my electronics and my accessories outside of my home, I feel very safe and very secure in knowing that it will be very very difficult to hack into my computer and access my data without my knowledge or permission. Security by obscurity is still quite useful. I looked at the Ubuntu code and while it is not perfect, security by correctness is also a major factor contributing to its reliability, stability, and security. I also like the fact that I can employ security by isolation by creating virtual sandboxes to run specific software applications and it is well documented on the forums and official Ubuntu help website.

I do not advocate for Ubuntu or GNU/Linux to others. I prefer that other people use whichever computer hardware and software that works best for their needs. I found my niche with Ubuntu. It does everything that I want and need to do without fuss or problems and at a very low cost of entry.

I do not miss using Microsoft Windows anymore. There are no leftover Windows software applications that I need to use to perform similar functions in Ubuntu. I enjoy the fact that most of the software packages are available at no cost and they are free, open source in nature. I understand that Canonical wants to expand its market share and it must compete in other spaces with different form factors, but the bulk of Ubuntu software packages remains free of charge to use and modify which is terrific. I am not opposed to paying for software applications if it performs a specific need better than its free, open source alternatives either. I am looking forward to future Ubuntu releases and an Ubuntu powered smart phone and tablet in a few years.

Finally, I love Unity 3D and the new Heads Up Display that will be improved upon in Ubuntu 12.04 64 bit LTS. I think this is where the future of software applications needs to go by making it simpler, easier, and faster along with more intuitive to use your computer. The HUD is particularly novel in that it allows Ubuntu users to control their entire desktop experience by entering a few key words to find exactly what they want to do. It is an idea whose time has finally come. Drop down menu bars are confusing and tedious to navigate through and it makes it difficult to perform the next task without wasting a lot of time memorizing which software applications belong to which menu bar in order to perform a specific function. The system monitor is great in that I can see a list of all running processes and I can kill individual processes without resulting in a system freeze, lockup, or crash which occurred regularly when I used Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit.

Azxff
January 29th, 2012, 04:57 AM
I currently have 3 HDD's that I can switch between. One has Windows 7 ultimate 32 bit on a Western Digital 40GB EIDE. Another has Windows XP Home sp3 on a Seagate 120GB PATA. Both of those drives are on a shelf above my desk...The one I have been using is also a Seagate 120GB PATA...It has Ubuntu 10.04 LTS 32 bit on it exclusively. I run all this in an old Compaq Presario with a ASUS K8s-la board. AMD Athlon64 venis core 2.2Ghz and a couple gigs of DDR 400. I really like Ubuntu..I have the 11.10 disk but I went back to the LTS in protest of unity...I may go ahead and give it another try now that I have upgraded the graphics with a nvidia agp card with 256mb of ddr. It works compiz flawlessly in 10.04...I also have another machine the wife mostly uses. A Dell Vostro slim tower with all the good stuff..Dual core Pentium, huge SATA hard drive and 4 gigs of DDR2...And it has Vista Business 32 bit, she likes it so it's hers, although I told her it would be a great Ubuntu machine..Got an HP laptop also with Window 7 64 bit Home Premium..Yes it is really nice, core i5 with 8 gigs of DDR3 and a huge SATA 2 hdd..I almost never mess with it, my daughter has co-opted that one...I like my old machine, and I like the way Linux runs on it..Seems as fast as theirs and I have much cooler graphics :-)

sanscents
January 29th, 2012, 06:37 AM
90%. I started using Ubuntu when XP SP3 was too cumbersome for my old laptop in 2009. I don't have it anymore.

I dual-booted my PC for a while, but then I ran Ubuntu solely for about a year, so for that period I had switched completely.

I recently got a Win7 drive, and I'm glad to have it for MS Office, but that's about it. Whenever something doesn't work in Ubuntu, I can check it in Win7. Ummm...what else do I need Windows for?

I'm happy with Ubuntu O:)

livemusic15
January 29th, 2012, 07:04 AM
Almost entirely! I've been on and off ubuntu, dual booting for the past two years or so.
However, I've been giving ubuntu a lot more of my time and effort. Windows? I uninstalled that some hours ago! HA! :p

Shade0o
January 29th, 2012, 08:13 AM
i fully use ubuntu for everything i do, picked up ubuntu about 2-2.5 years ago. have swapped to fedora for a few months and tryed Arch but it was 3am and didnt release it was barebones so that didnt last, love gnome-shell would like to oneday set up an Arch but i am just too lazy to get around to it.
I am a gamer and fully depend on wine for most of my games. some games i think look good i dont get to play(currently the Tribes Ascend beta) but for the most part i dont mind as Rift and EVE both work.

I can see myself booting ReactOS in a year or two, but not sure if it will keep me

Azyx
January 29th, 2012, 10:19 AM
I have switched completely to Ubuntu on PCs. Still have OSX on a g4 iLamp because, I don't can get iLamp to go completely in suspend (screen does not turned off, the back-light still on). But now I have Windos 7 on a Virtualbox machine on Ubuntu 10.04LTS, because my library demand Adobe Digital Edition to borrow enkrypted e-books. Yes I know that It's possible to run it Under wine, but I canẗ download ADE, just install it from Adobes home page and there you need windos :(

jwaipouri
January 31st, 2012, 06:31 AM
I first encountered ubuntu on my friend's macbook air last year...he's a talented hacker, and I got to thinking that maybe he was onto something, so I gave it a go. Being a non-computer literate person, I was naturally running the standard XP my Acer Aspire One came with. I tried it for about three days, and after working out that it would do all the web, email and music I wanted to do, dropped windows completely...something about nervous of viruses..I wanted something reliable and reasonably easy to fix. Works great! Just downgraded from 11:10 to 10:04, my laptop has never been so fast!
Love it.

hilz
January 31st, 2012, 11:08 AM
On my notebook, Toshiba Satellite 2410, I have switched completely. The reason being the default XP install failed and I had no install disk. Only challenge I have with the lappy is getting the Nvidea drivers to work. I have two partitions of 15G each. One with 10.04LTS and the other with 11.10. The 10.04LTS partition has the nvidea drivers working so I play games with that one. The 11.10 partition is for work and is fine with browsing, email and office but has 2D graphics.

LinuXofArabiA
February 1st, 2012, 02:04 PM
I completely switched to Ubuntu about a year ago. I am not a gamer, I was simply fed up with all the viruses creeping up on my XP, and wanted a safer platform to browse the Internet without having to worry too much... However, I had to install XP through VirtualBox to use iTunes.

TechZilla
February 2nd, 2012, 08:01 PM
Completely switched to Linux 8 years ago, never looked back. I'v been working as a Linux Sysadmin for last 6 years, and never personally use another OS. It was the the most influential decision I've ever made. Started with Ubuntu when it was 4.10, Then went to Debian 6 months later. Came back when it was 6.10, and it was a better experience. Even for a Debian guy, I like Ubuntu.

TheFu
February 2nd, 2012, 08:12 PM
I want to erase Windows but unfortunately, I'm still a gamer at heart.

100% completely? Nope.
Sadly there are a few things that are much easier on MS-Windows than under Linux. For me, the apps that can't be replaced are:
* MS-Visio (and MS-Office when I need to embed Visio diagrams into client documents)
* Windows7 Media Center (for QAM TV recording)
* VideoRedo TV Suite - commercial removal and WTV-MPG conversions
* Quicken 2012 (though I have 2011 working under WINE)
* QuickBooks

I do everything else under Linux. Everything. I run 4 physical systems with Ubuntu Server and about 20 virtual machines with Xen, KVM, or VirtualBox VM engines.

I've had at least 1 machine running Linux since 1993, but it didn't become my daily-use desktop until late 2007. From '96 on, I've had a Linux server "somewhere" on the network.

Does that count as a convert?

youvebeengoosed
February 6th, 2012, 02:00 PM
I started out with apple moved on to windows and I now run Linu, the only thing from what I see that makes apple worth buying is final cut pro other then that Linux takes care of everything else I do as far as adjusting to how it runs and works ubuntu has not been a problem for me to run at all. If God will allow me to buy a Apple MAC book pro I will so I can use final cut pro x and do a dual boot so i can keep a high resale value on my laptop and still enjoy the lovelyness of ubuntu great combination for me:popcorn:

Mosome
February 6th, 2012, 02:05 PM
Gaming experience on Windows and the media is deplorable. There is always a need for a new patch, upgrade and reinstall for games. In the end I am happy with my monk life without being hassled.

Ubuntu/Linux is great for networking and I can run blocked lists in the 1000s as well as superior parsing capabilities. The programming experience in MSVS is also deplorable, as editing tons of DHTML startup scripts was a pain to do and reinstall.

Only quarks is setting up media features efficiently in Ubuntu and always finding programs relying on OpenGL.

MotherPuncher
February 6th, 2012, 05:50 PM
I completely switched to Linux when I accidentally deleted about half of my windows 7 system folders during an attempted dual-boot install of Xubuntu.

markMDW
February 8th, 2012, 04:30 AM
I've been using Ubuntu and Xubuntu for several years and am about 95+% switched over. There are times when when there isn't an alternative, like with filing taxes, then I use another. Otherwise I always use linux.

There are a couple of reasons. It's not just that most everything is without fee, but rather the philosophy of how sharing software is beneficial. that attracts me to FOSS. I just use it, period, but the idea that others are out there using it, then adding their own improvements, and then others will in turn build upon those improvements, and eventually new products can evolve that better compete against existing products. (think smartphones, ebook readers, commercial video recording appliances, etc) Businesses get to capitalize on the resources and develop more competitive hardware products while consumers get to use ever evolving software products, limited only by ones imagination.

The approach is magnetically appealing and that's why I don't missing a few proprietary features or fancies, if I can get done what (and when) I need to get done. I'd rather have freedom and unlimited stainless steel than locked in a cell with unlimited gold.

Linux FOSS is like DNA, its genetic and spawns what people need and gives them the tools for self-empowerment. Closed source is designed to spawn dependency and addiction with the provider in control.

Kudos to the philosophers and pragmatists involved. Linux really is priceless.

ctrlmd
February 8th, 2012, 07:02 AM
im no longer linux user i removed linux from all my machines
and now im windows only user to me there is no purpose for continuing with linux

in fact this post maybe the last post in this forum
it was good forum i enjoyed my time

see you maybe in another world

HansKisaragi
February 8th, 2012, 10:06 AM
I plan to switch 100% when I get my new Nvidia card.

Been gimped with ATI for far to long.

Jake Sweeney
February 8th, 2012, 10:54 AM
I would switch to pure Ubuntu, but I need Windows for Itunes.

mörgæs
February 8th, 2012, 11:33 AM
Have you tried this?
https://one.ubuntu.com/music/

painejake
February 8th, 2012, 01:38 PM
If Line6 POD Farm was available under Ubuntu and worked seamlessly I wouldn't have an issue removing my Windows partition, however as it stands I need the software too much.

peyre
February 9th, 2012, 04:42 AM
im no longer linux user i removed linux from all my machines
and now im windows only user to me there is no purpose for continuing with linux

Or indeed any purpose in using capital letters or punctuation, it seems.

sammiev
February 9th, 2012, 04:57 AM
Or indeed any purpose in using capital letters or punctuation, it seems.

This post servers no purpose. Why even comment as such?

jasonrisenburg
February 9th, 2012, 05:07 AM
I love linux, Ubuntu, and Im a big fan. I use both windows 7 and Ubuntu. I love it. My wife loves windows. there has to be a compermise right.... I need both, but love ubuntu.

lgharriman
February 9th, 2012, 05:35 AM
I use Linux exclusively.
I use Ubuntu 11.04 on the Fujitsu Stylistic St5032D tablet computer.
I use Pclinuxos 2011.09 on my homebuilt AMD Dual core system.
I use Bodhi Linux 1.31 on my WebDT 366 Tablet.
I use Puppy Linux Macpup 5.25 on my Fujitsu Stylistic ST3400, and ST3500 tablet computers.

I have been using Linux from its start in 1991. I have about 400 CD's I've burned over the years of various distributions.

I have never gotten along with any Microsoft operating systems.
I enjoy Linux and the freedom it gives me to make changes to better suit my needs.
:popcorn::popcorn:

Azyx
February 9th, 2012, 07:20 AM
I use Linux exclusively.
I use Ubuntu 11.04 on the Fujitsu Stylistic St5032D tablet computer.
I use Pclinuxos 2011.09 on my homebuilt AMD Dual core system.
I use Bodhi Linux 1.31 on my WebDT 366 Tablet.
I use Puppy Linux Macpup 5.25 on my Fujitsu Stylistic ST3400, and ST3500 tablet computers.

Interisting. Can you tell why you have so many diatrubitions and what their advances and disadvances on the different distrubitions?

/Cheers

peyre
February 9th, 2012, 06:14 PM
Or indeed any purpose in using capital letters or punctuation, it seems.
This post servers no purpose. Why even comment as such?

Well, let's see...perhaps to mock someone who makes a blanket condemnation of Linux? I wouldn't fault anyone for saying they preferred Windows, or tried Linux and it didn't work out for them, but to make a blunt assertion that Linux has no purpose (with nothing to back it up)--that justifies a response. The fact that he used, literally, no capitalization or punctuation was just an easy angle to use.

b3rylord
February 9th, 2012, 06:35 PM
Been with Ubuntu since 9.10, and always upgrade a couple of months after new versions became available. Usability improves at every upgrade, and I jumped in with both feet and rid myself of the cumbersome and slow Microsoft XP. I have not looked back.
Compaq Presario C500, Ubuntu 11.10, Canon Pixma i3300 (for which drivers were loaded in the background and works perfectly) Vodafone K3520 dongle also works without any intervention from me, and whenever I visit friends wireless loads up on their guest networks without prompting when passwords are known.....wonderful stuff......keep improving!!!

goldshirt9
February 9th, 2012, 09:11 PM
Interisting. Can you tell why you have so many diatrubitions and what their advances and disadvances on the different distrubitions?

/Cheers
at a quess ,I'd say he likes linux :):)
but seriously why not try a few

SeanIM
February 10th, 2012, 12:23 AM
Let me run Camtasia or some other decent screencasting software and I'm all linux all day.

Sadly that's keeping me stuck on the old windows platform for now.

Torgas Prim
February 10th, 2012, 12:35 AM
I bought a new hard drive and installed Linux Mint Katya, and now have installed Unbuntu 11.10 64bit on it. My win7 hard drive is sealed in a bag and put away. I cannot see why I would go back to Windows. I can do everything I want in Ubuntu already. Including playing all of my Windows games :-)

hildenbrandsteven
February 10th, 2012, 02:56 AM
I haven't booted into windows since installing linux. :-)

imundzana
February 10th, 2012, 04:27 AM
i've been using ubuntu for almost 2 years. i still have win7starter on my netbook, but i never use it if i can help it. i still help family/others with windows problems, but i'd way rather be using ubuntu. i do miss paint.net...pinta's /ok/, but not quite the clone i was hoping for.

HansKisaragi
February 10th, 2012, 02:15 PM
I have finally taken the step and switched 100% :D

After years of missing Linux i finally cracked.. Moved my gaming over to consoles and formated all my hdds.

running Ubuntu 11.10 now.

Philip Gray
February 10th, 2012, 06:44 PM
Hi Quake unfortunately I still have to use Windows so I still dual boot. I do office work at home. I still watch my DVD movies in Windows. The reason: Powerdvd saves the spot where you stop watching. Neither VLC or Movie player does this. The other reason is my weekly puzzles from www.lenagames.com does not work in linux, and I simply have to have my weekly jigsaw puzzle. Tried using WINE, all I got for my trouble was a whole bunch of multi-coloured square blocks.

Regards
Philip

garyinspringhill
February 10th, 2012, 07:48 PM
Have run a flavor of linux for 12 years (Ubuntu 10.04lts now) I use it for everything from POS, cctv, 3d milling, 2d engraving and all the regular desktop stuff. I have one BIG server and run 5 thin clients with LTSP (HP gt7725) works like a charm no maintenance to speak of.

oarion7
February 13th, 2012, 01:02 AM
im no longer linux user i removed linux from all my machines
and now im windows only user to me there is no purpose for continuing with linux

in fact this post maybe the last post in this forum
it was good forum i enjoyed my time

see you maybe in another world

Unfortunately, the penalty for apostasy is severe. ;)

BlackRoseReader
February 13th, 2012, 03:42 AM
Let's see. Between my house and work I have 5 machines: 2 Windows 7, 1 Vista, 1 OS Lion, 2 Linux (1 - Ubuntu and 1 Backtrack).

Terry Maker
February 13th, 2012, 10:30 AM
I've been running Maverick Meerkat for about 18 months now.

I have three computers, and by operating systems, they are Maverick Meerkat, Maverick Meerkat/Hackintosh, (laptop), and Apple Snow Leopard 10.5.8, having dumped all windows variants completely!

I've found Maverick, to be very stable on my Dell Dimension 3000, and, on the Novatech Laptop, (there are the 855 video driver problems that cause very minor glitches but nothing serious), the Dell has no issues whatsoever.

I have found that I can do all of the main things that I have a computer for, just as easily, if not easier, using Linux! And without the usual 'Windows Problems'!

I discount the inability to sync my phone to this version of Evolution since I don't need to do that.

I tried to upgrade to Natty, but sadly my older machines won't support it!

Regards

Terry M

winh8r
February 13th, 2012, 12:05 PM
I switched to Ubuntu in 2006/2007, I knew nothing about dual booting then so just formatted my HDD and did a clean install of Ubuntu. The learning curve was fairly steep in the early days , but due to my hatred of Wind*ws , I stuck with Ubuntu.

Nowadays I run 10.04.3LTS and also have a partition with 11.10 on it which I have altered the default desktop environment to the MATE environment.

Also play around with other distros in Virtualbox and use it as a test environment for modifying Ubuntu before committing changes for real to my main system.

I would never ever return to Wind*ws as there is no need, everything I want to do , I can do with Ubuntu.

The other major benefit of Ubuntu is the existence of this forum, a single resource where solutions and advice are given in a friendly and straightforward manner.

netsuvi
February 13th, 2012, 12:19 PM
at home 100% at work partly, still need windows for some office tasks. All Servers ar 100% Linux as well.

Darkling1991
February 13th, 2012, 06:51 PM
Linux on my laptop for surfing the web, programming and do almost everything i do daily. On my desktop is windows 7 only for gaming

matbluvenger
February 14th, 2012, 12:01 AM
For a first post this thread seems as good as any.

My old, old, old, etc., motherboard took a crap two weeks ago so I replaced that along with the graphics card, RAM, and PSU. I started it up and it booted Windows 7 but ran into problems (I'll spare the details.) I then decided to try just starting fresh by doing a clean install of Ubuntu 11.10.

Needless to say, holy crap I'm never going back.



I also laughed when I realized the "Ocelot" moniker. Couldn't help but think of Archer and Baboo

http://www.stuffistumbledupon.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/archer-Ocelot.2009.s03e03.720p.hdtv_.x264-compulsion.mkv_snapshot_19.40_2012.02.04_09.10.17. jpg

OH MY GOD look at his spots!

redsariku
February 14th, 2012, 10:58 AM
Games and psychology (lies) are the only things keeping Windows alive right now.

Jezzze
February 14th, 2012, 01:48 PM
Yesterday was the big day for me, removed my Windows 7 installation and installed the newest Ubuntu on my desktop.

I used to have Ubuntu and W7 on dual boot, but decided I just better switch to Ubuntu completely, since that's what I wanted all the time already.

The only thing that I will miss of Windows would be that all games and software could run on it, although Wine does an excellent job at that with Linux.

Yarolinux
February 14th, 2012, 04:40 PM
Also my first post. This could be difficult to answer as "completely switched" could be relative. I have personally been using the Linux kernel with various distros since 1997. I started with Slackware, which I still use today. I also have Ubuntu on my Laptop - which runs great!

Recently (last week), my girlfriend had a HDD crash in her HP DC7900. She asked me if I thought it would be a good investment to use this opportunity to buy Windows 7 - "as it would be a more effective OS going forward" -she commented.

I convinced her to let me install an even more effective OS, Ubuntu 11.10. Thanks Canonical for an absolutely great OS! Even better for her transition, I found a theme on gnome-look.org that (with a little bit of work) makes it look just like windows 7.

Now if I could just get the cat to switch, the whole family would be using using Linux. :D

peyre
February 14th, 2012, 05:20 PM
Games and psychology (lies) are the only things keeping Windows alive right now.

That and the sweetheart deals that MS has with OEMs, which I think may be our biggest obstacle of all. Since Windows automatically comes with a purchase of a new computer (and seeminly free), end users never have to consider the operating system when making a purchase.

gentracer
February 17th, 2012, 01:43 AM
Until OpenOffice or LibreOffice can really handle Office 2010, no can do.

In addition, dealing with dual monitors with 11.10 is ridiculously difficult.

Until stuff like that 'just works', can't completely switch.

ageofsteam
February 17th, 2012, 01:50 PM
I switched over completely several years ago. (Bill Gates, the great promoter of open-source! turned thousands of people to using Linux by releasing Vista!)

The only thing I really miss is Silverlight support for Netflix streaming. (Yes, I know about Moonlight, but it doesn't work for the Netflix site, which is the only place where I needed to use it anyway.)

alliance1975
February 17th, 2012, 01:57 PM
For work, be it home or office, I use XP. It does Turbotax and converts my home videos and it enables me to make modifications to my phone software.

For fun I used to use Ubuntu, then I switched to Mint.

My home server does use Ubuntu 10.10 server.

peyre
February 17th, 2012, 06:23 PM
I switched over completely several years ago. (Bill Gates, the great promoter of open-source! turned thousands of people to using Linux by releasing Vista!)

And here I thought I was all alone in turning to Linux as a result of Vista. Sure I had toyed with the idea for years, but it was the realization that XP was a dead end and Vista (at the time) looked to be the future, that finally prompted me to take the plunge.

bregale
February 17th, 2012, 09:24 PM
i like to think i have switched to linux i have been using it fr the last 4 years, but then i need to scan something so i to dual boot to xp because i have never got my scanner to work on linux, i have been trying on ubuntu since version 8.04 tried all the different ideas and installed the drivers from avasys dozens of times . also i find the photo printing progs not as good or very limited on options to print. so i still have not fully switched from that virus ridden os . :(

cwklinuxguy
February 17th, 2012, 09:27 PM
Unfortunately, my multimedia interests, which include a media course at my high school, requires me to continue using Mac OS X in order to get the best possible Multimedia software. However, when the time comes that Linux will do the job just as well, I will be switching over to it entirely. Unfortunately, I may be forced to buy another mac with one of the newer versions of Mac OS X before that...which I don't like the idea of.

peyre
February 18th, 2012, 04:59 AM
i like to think i have switched to linux i have been using it fr the last 4 years, but then i need to scan something so i to dual boot to xp because i have never got my scanner to work on linux, i have been trying on ubuntu since version 8.04 tried all the different ideas and installed the drivers from avasys dozens of times . also i find the photo printing progs not as good or very limited on options to print. so i still have not fully switched from that virus ridden os . :(

That's unfortunate. I have (or have had) three Canon scanners and an Epson all-in-one.

The Canons just worked (whereas in Windows I had to install drivers, Ubuntu recognized them automatically), and the Epson worked with a bit of installation and coaxing (it's an all-in-one, after all, and I'm accessing it over the network).

tomsn2
February 18th, 2012, 05:27 AM
My advise for gaming is to have either a smallish windows partition or separate drive and boot that when you want to game or get a console like PS3. It is what I plan to do since I currently don't have windows on this box at all. Some games will work with wine and playonlinux. Search around and see if what you play can run well on Linux and you might be able to save yourself the agony of a messing with dual boot.

Blue skies!