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Akhnatoun
December 21st, 2010, 06:34 PM
I've been Ubuntu geek from 6 months ago, rarely booting Windows Vista.

Last time I booted vista was 2 weeks ago, to log in a website -using IE- that cannot run fully-functional in firefox.

And one more thing, to charge my mobile broadband Data-SIM, as I've not found a good application for that, which can allow me to send SMS using my USB modem sim.

Tadcrazio
December 21st, 2010, 08:04 PM
You cancelled Netflix in order to have only Linux?
We won't think any less of you here if you use Windows, you know. ;)

lmao I know that, but netflix was really the only thing tying me onto windows, and for the few movies I was watching it wont kill me to find them on sites like hulu or elsewhere, or even by a dvd/blueray

Zzl1xndd
December 21st, 2010, 08:06 PM
lmao I know that, but netflix was really the only thing tying me onto windows, and for the few movies I was watching it wont kill me to find them on sites like hulu or elsewhere, or even by a dvd/blueray

I use Linux exclusively on my PC, however I still have a Netflix account. I just use Netflix through my PS3.

cf0531
December 21st, 2010, 09:53 PM
I get laughed at all the time because the tech school I go to has the microsoft IT academy accreditation and I refuse to use anything but Ubuntu. Although it makes things tough when I take courses like server 2008 configuration and windows 7 configuration and I have no way to study, but with my major, i have a feeling that linux is going to be more of a major player. there is a misconception that microsoft dominates all markets and that simply is not the truth. so for the time being ill swallow my pride and take the courses for my degree but i wont compromise and put windows on my home machines.

Kalimol
December 22nd, 2010, 12:05 AM
However, I'm still looking for that "wow" factor. Ubuntu does everything that other OS's do, and more, and better, but it hasn't really shaken me to my core. I swapped over for simplicity, not for innovation: I've already been converted, but is there something I'm missing?

For me, Gnome and Compiz Fusion were Linux's "killer app". Switching to Ubuntu and ticking a few boxes meant that I suddenly had a much prettier interface that really looked futuristic at the time, switching from Vista. Really, though, OSX is equally pretty, and equally quick, stable, and secure, for that matter. The wow factor for me was really predicated on switching from Windows, not OSX.

But it was wowing at the time. = )

pbhill
December 22nd, 2010, 03:28 AM
I used to dual boot, but what a pain. Now I have XP installed in a virtual machine for the two programs I need it for, Quickbooks and Chief Architect.
I'm not a gamer, but if I were this might not be an acceptable setup as the VM uses a lot of memory. I have 2GB and probably should have 4. I have no desire to go back to Windows.

TriBlox6432
December 22nd, 2010, 04:02 AM
Ubuntu is the only OS on this machine. I use XP at school though, because that's what the school computer have. I tried using Win7 on my mum's computer, and it sucked. I couldn't do anything that I could on Ubuntu.

peyre
December 22nd, 2010, 05:42 AM
I get laughed at all the time because the tech school I go to has the microsoft IT academy accreditation and I refuse to use anything but Ubuntu. Although it makes things tough when I take courses like server 2008 configuration and windows 7 configuration and I have no way to study, but with my major, i have a feeling that linux is going to be more of a major player. there is a misconception that microsoft dominates all markets and that simply is not the truth. so for the time being ill swallow my pride and take the courses for my degree but i wont compromise and put windows on my home machines.

You know, it wouldn't do you any harm to install VirtualBox and set up the Windows configurations you need to study with. Then you can just delete the VMs when you don't need them any more--shoot, you could make a party out of it! Pop a cork, think out loud "I've learned your OS, now here's what I think of it", then press the delete key.

frank cox
December 22nd, 2010, 07:04 AM
Thanks to the Ultimate Boot Disk CD I was able to save the data from a Billy box a friend has . Of course that program boots into Linux. Reminds me of why I don't do windows.
If I have to go to a never version of quick books I will buy Crossover Linux before I use windows again.

ZeroAdam
December 22nd, 2010, 02:22 PM
I got my MCP certification in 2003. Since then, i've switched to OS X, and then to Ubuntu. I do love my Macs but I've switched all the PCs at home to Ubuntu, and I just bought myself a System76 Pangolin laptop for Christmas! I've got our kids all switched over to Ubuntu from windows, and they love it as well.

I've even installed it on my computer at work and use VirtualBox for the software that is windows only. I don't see myself ever going back.

justfred
December 22nd, 2010, 02:52 PM
Switched from windows XP to Ubuntu Jaunty (9.04) also for my work in May 2009 shortly after it came out but I was already following Ubuntu with an experimental dual boot PC at home since Breezy Badger (5.10).

Before that I had installed and played a bit with Red Hat 8 on a small 200MHz 128MB PC. In parallel I had another 66MHz PC running OpenBSD 3.6 which I updated until 4.1 and I used mainly as a home firewall/router.

I used Mac's (also for work) until 2001 (so never used MacOSX).

I work in a scientific engineering research environment but nevertheless need to contribute to papers, presentations and documents which are still mainly in the MS Office format.

Although Open Office gets better and better it is (in my honest opinion) for some aspects still not as good or "user friendly" than the MS suite (I know the 2003 quite well) but most importantly the documents do not always translate well between Oo and MS.

So sometimes there is no other solution than to fire up a virtualbox PC with windows XP and the MS Office 2003 suite to work on some of the documents.

For my scientific programing I switched from Fortran to Matlab back in 2000 and since 2008-9 I've switched to python (iPython, scipy, etc ...) and I am very happy with it.

One other piece of software that I regularly come to miss is AutoCAD. I don't seem to have found anything yet that is as stable and fast as the original for linux ... again virtualbox comes to rescue.

It's just life : MS still rules out there !

In the mean time the whole family followed and my son, daughter and wife all switched to Ubuntu at home and for their school work (they all have their own laptops or desktop). We have still one PC which is dual boot and which has a series of Windows games on it and which is not connected to the internet.

I provide most of the IT services and support at home :D : it is still the case that using linux, even Ubuntu, requires to sometimes google and consult forums a lot for solutions and/or alternatives to software : most annoying are e.g. installing printers (e.g. Lexmark x1150 = Dell A920). Without my support and my natural interest since forever for "things to do with computers" I do not think that the switch over from MS to Ubuntu would have been successful at home. Now, I think the family won't go back to Windows ...

If I had one wish it would that Oo and MS Office would become even more compatible OR that a MS Office Suite for Linux would exist ... I was once told that the big Apple - MS 'look and feel' lawsuite of the 90's was resolved with an obligation for MS to produce an MS Office compatible product for Mac's 'for ever'. Yes, that was very thoughtful from the Apple boys at that time.

So in conclusion, linux and in particular Ubuntu, has become a real alternative provided that 1) you have some good experience and courage to be able to solve some interface and document compatibility issues between the still vastly dominating MS world out there and 2) (probably) your not a gamer.

Tristan Tonks
December 22nd, 2010, 03:02 PM
I was forced back to windows 7 a year ago when I got a new boss - it was far more problem free than any previous windows BUT, after the second virus knocked me out to two days my boss let me go back to Ubuntu :) and I have not lost as much time since - Linux is not trouble free - but it is a lot easier to work with when things go wrong and once you have everything working it will usually stay that way until you mess with it.

The community is also very supportive.
I would not go back to windows for anyone - a lot of my older IT customers have commented that it is easier to use and they call me far less than the ones who are still on windows. Thats service for you :) !

AliceKingsley
December 22nd, 2010, 04:57 PM
I installed Kubuntu about 4 months ago, and I didn't bother starting by dual-booting. School & work were on hold for medical issues, so I figured I had the time. Nothing awful would happen if I was without my laptop for a day or two. To be fair, I did borrow my parent's desktop once or twice to jump on the forums here.

I jumped into it without knowing much about computers at all, and I still don't know much. But I'm slowly figuring out how to do the things I want to be able to do, and on the way I'm learning a bit of how things work.

Now I'm trying to figure out how to get a couple of games running, but they're ones that I know can run on Linux, it's just a matter of figuring out how.

I will not be going back. :D

TheLugal
December 22nd, 2010, 06:46 PM
jeez, do anyone keep track of this tread? It got 752 pages! :o

Anyway, I've got two laptops for a while; one I got at school and one private. The private one has got nothing but Ubuntu for around a year. I love it!
As soon as I leased the school-computer, I installed Arch Linux on it. And I learned A LOT since then.

I will use nothing but Linux on my computers! It's awesome!:KS

paskari
December 22nd, 2010, 09:33 PM
I first made the switch from Windows to Mac, and now am migrating to Ubuntu.

I still have windows 95/XP/7 all installed in case I want to run games, but that's all

dumitru
December 22nd, 2010, 11:03 PM
For the last 11 years I had only Windows.

About a month ago I for the first time installed Linux Mint on my home laptop, and I'm still using Mint. But it's still with dual boot in case I need to do something in Windows. Now I'm working in Linux Mint with Ubuntu's Radiance theme. I liked Linux, especially Ubuntu, and I am eager to join Linux community.

I tried to install Ubuntu at my work but it was freezing. I've read on forums that it is a usual Ubuntu problem. That's why I continue using Windows XP up there.

Anticrombie
December 22nd, 2010, 11:41 PM
I've been running Ubuntu since Hardy on dual boot. Never got the chance to upgrade since I was always in another country, busy with soldiers. I then went to lucid, discovered Vbox, tested it with xp for office.(School) So now here I am with Mavrick, running Vbox for office since my college requires all formats in office. (Tried O/O.org doesn't convert as well as I need it too) But still enjoy when I don't have to bother with Vbox. ;)

HeatPro
December 23rd, 2010, 12:52 AM
Well ... almost. I program Windows apps as well.

I got rid of XP Home on this Acer Aspire Netbook I'm using to type now, as the XP on it was difficult to see, took too long to boot, and was more difficult to back up with all the sales protection MS puts on it.

I can't compliment the participants that put together this NetBook Ubuntu version enough. It's very clean and easy to set up. I put two network printers on and was printing in a few minutes, never having to read procedures. I'm using a 22" 1400 x 900 screen; but it is easy to see on the little 10-inch screen too.

I'd had Windows 7 32-bit on the same machine, but it bogged, so I used it with Puppy5, but didn't like the save to shut down time. Xubuntu was alright, but I really like this Netbook 10.10 version. Running on a solid state hard 32 gig drive, there's enough room for Ubuntu on 11 gig, a swap, and a Fat partition for network document share reads.

vanko1406
December 23rd, 2010, 01:08 PM
Please click one of the Quick Reply icons in the posts above to activate Quick Reply.

jsampaio57
December 25th, 2010, 04:06 PM
I started trying linux in 1998 (SuSE 5). I could never remove MSW from a dual boot until 2005, when I first tried Ubuntu 5.4. Since then I nolonger needed Windows for my daily use, and no longer a dual boot. And I am heavy user of scientific, math and editing applications. There is no question that for a typical user (those who need only access internet, send and receive emails,, listen some music, watch some movies, and play some games, MS windows is thoroughly unnecessary.

randolf_ambrose
December 25th, 2010, 04:15 PM
I have used windows 98, xp, vista and even win7... for years...

during the time of dial-up connections, i tried to install, i think gusty on my desktop but i could just install and watch the beauty of it and couldnt do anything else...

once broadband **** came to my city, first thing i did was burn all windows cd's, and installed gusty!!!

i never got to play much games when i used bindows!!!

NOW I USE LUCID!!! LUCID ONLY!!! for all my needs... music... movies... work... internet... audio/video editing... and even games like, assaultcube, FREESPACE etc...

LINUX IS THE ANSWER!!!

Vi3tHoneyX
December 25th, 2010, 10:50 PM
I made my laptop to only use Ubuntu and have been surviving off of my PS3 and 360 for video games so far... I wonder how long this will last. It's only been about a week! Haha. [=<3

Bitrate
December 26th, 2010, 08:07 AM
I made a complete switch to Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS on all of my machines (two laptops and two desktops) as well as those of my family and friends. I was previously running openSUSE 11.x for two years but got tired of its stability issues (KDE 4.x related) and lack of polish in key areas. Looking for a good solid Linux distro I went back to Ubuntu (I first installed Dapper Drake 6.06 years ago then left it behind) and chose the current 10.04 LTS release (Lucid Lynx).

Before installing Lucid Lynx I ensured that my mix of applications had Linux alternatives or close workalikes which would help with the transition. I needn't have worried about this step as Ubuntu exceeded my expectations with application support but it was the three areas of stability, security and performance that impressed me the most.

I've used quite a few Operating Systems over the years (including MSDOS 3,4,5,6, Win2.03, Win3.0, Win3.11, Win9x series, OS/2 2.x/3.x, NT4, 2000, XP, XP64) and I've yet to experience a distribution that has been as robust, smooth and polished as Lucid Lynx. It's a refreshing experience to actually ENJOY troubleshooting a Linux distribution of this calibre compared with the endless chore and frustration in dealing with Windows boxes.

The only time I fire up Windows (XP or Windows 7) is in a sandbox - which is where it belongs so it can't do any real damage.

vtired
December 26th, 2010, 08:46 PM
Still 100% linux but not faithful to any one distribution. The office computer is Ubuntu 10.04 and will remain that till the next LTS. Other computers keep on changing between fedora, linux mint and debian. Debian seems the best apart from the ugly fonts.

ElSlunko
December 27th, 2010, 01:22 AM
Was 100% ubuntu until I bought my new HP laptop. I figured I'd stay 100% windows on the lappy but ended up installing Ubuntu before too long. With all of my steam games being able to run through wine and all my photo processing being done via linux software, I haven't booted into my windows partition in a while.

I keep it around just in case I need windows on the road, but funny thing is the situation hasn't come up. I just feel dumb for giving windows half my hard drive space now :).

Cpl.Punishment
December 27th, 2010, 02:04 AM
I finally made the full switch on my main box a few weeks ago. I have an old computer that I keep running for MagicJack only. Once I get that going, then I am totally done. The hardest thing was to give up the games that only play on windows or mac....but the PS3 helped me out with that. Prior to all this I dual booted for like 5 years.

sffvba[e0rt
December 27th, 2010, 02:37 AM
Was 100% Linux for a few months. My games beckon so back to Windows on my desktop (still have a laptop and netbook with Linux... can't see that changing anytime soon)

404

ImDougy
December 27th, 2010, 05:32 AM
i never use windows anymore if i wanna play a windows game i run it in wine and it usually works

tonycm1
December 27th, 2010, 06:09 AM
My home computer is Ubuntu 10.04.1, my Home Theatre PC is Ubuntu Netbook Remix... my work laptop is XP but i've installed Ubuntu 10.04.1 with Wubi and only load XP for:
-Using Garmin Mapsource for Geocaching
-Proprietary Work Applications that don't run in WINE
-Citrix ICA Client to Remote to Work Network (uses Entrust)

IWantFroyo
December 27th, 2010, 02:42 PM
I haven't completely switched, but as soon as Windows gets outdated on a computer, it gets Linux. The only Windows loaded computer I use is my laptop, which came with Windows 7. That's what I run Windows programs on if I REALLY need them.

Webster12
December 27th, 2010, 07:57 PM
Windows 7 wiped itself out of my laptop.....how cruel when all my files are there!! So I replaced it with ubuntu.

cf0531
December 27th, 2010, 09:13 PM
You know, it wouldn't do you any harm to install VirtualBox and set up the Windows configurations you need to study with. Then you can just delete the VMs when you don't need them any more--shoot, you could make a party out of it! Pop a cork, think out loud "I've learned your OS, now here's what I think of it", then press the delete key.

I could, but then id have to upgrade my computer to run the resource leech that is win7. so for now I'll just use the school computers for the classwork. we have to use vm's for all the labs anyway since we need a client server environment for the custom deployments and all that.

Lisimelis
December 27th, 2010, 10:57 PM
Been a ubuntu user only since 9.10! Even at work!!!

resthavener
December 29th, 2010, 01:13 PM
Quite agree about rubbish printer driver - I too need the wife's xp laptop to print. Still can't recommend Linux to normal human beings when such basics are defective.

ingeva
December 29th, 2010, 03:59 PM
Quite agree about rubbish printer driver - I too need the wife's xp laptop to print. Still can't recommend Linux to normal human beings when such basics are defective.
Some (very few) printers are not supported in Linux.
If you buy a PostScript compatible printer however, you are probably never lost.
PostScript is a very much better solution for *nix systems, and even Windows har good support for them. Printers with a proprietary protocol are not a good choice. I guess you've been unlucky.

I bought an Epson scanner that was supported under Linux till 8.04. Unfortunately that's now history, so I still have to use Windows XP for scanning. I never use it for anything else. I would, of course, if I was a virus collector. :twisted:

Hur Dur
December 29th, 2010, 04:03 PM
Used a customized Debian install for about 6 months. Then I started having Serious Sam withdrawals, and switched back to a Windows dual-boot.

My other computer has been running SliTaz exclusively for about a year now.

viMitch
December 29th, 2010, 04:20 PM
When I first tried to switch, I got confused by the Debian' FTP system, gave up, and found Xubuntu. :)

The version I used was 8.04, although I didn't completely switch 'till 9.04.

So happy I did though.

At the moment I use Ubuntu 10.04 and Debian Squeeze. :D

def670
December 29th, 2010, 05:05 PM
been running *nix for over 15yrs - have the wintrash for the wife (and she teaches more suckers how to use windows) and kids. one kid converted to Ubuntu, which has been my mainstay for the last 1.5yrs on my netbook (my main). My other main is a freebsd machine that serves everything for my network. the only use i get from windows is the occasional game of UT2003....id have it on my netbook but lost the disk at some point and just not game motivated enough to locate it.

day to day Ubuntu keeps me awake

kevxh
January 1st, 2011, 07:44 PM
Happy new year!

This marks a significant occasion for me as I've just competed my first full year Windows free. YAY!

Loving my Linux and still making a living out of the poor saps that want to ruin their lives with Windows.

LewRockwellFAN
January 2nd, 2011, 12:07 AM
/me holds up hand.

----------------------
I have 5 bootable OSs on my system (not counting safe versions, old kernels, etc.) and I will probably try a few more in time. I still have a Windows 2000 installed and available on the grub menu but I haven't booted into it in months. I own xp but I don't have it installed and don't ever expect to use that pile of crap again. I used a beta W7 for a while but I wasn't impressed.

kingbilly
January 2nd, 2011, 01:52 AM
Always kept a dual boot for Age of Empires II. Couldn't figure out network play with VM instances, otherwise I could be rid of it forever (if I had better hardware).

new2011
January 2nd, 2011, 02:05 AM
I once used Windows XP, but it crashed a year ago. Unable to use my PC in any way I was forced to switch over to Ubuntu. Back then it was Ubuntu 9.1. I was impressed. It really is better than Windows. First, how many operating systems include all these programs? Not Windows. Only Explorer and Recycling Bin. Still not sure? How much did you spend on bare bones? Maybe 2 to 3 hundred. But the one thing I really like about Ubuntu and this is the best reason: the option to write script. Yes, with Ubuntu you can truly call your programs your own 'cause you wrote them and installed them and you know their yours. You might have to pay Microsoft for that privilege. The own the Visual C++. If it was really a re-distributable, why do you register? Cause it's not. I switched for all of the above reasons, including my PC crash. I'm still new to it. But I learn more each day of use. To tell you ALL of the benefits would require a library of space. I hope my answer here proved to helpful and informative.:lolflag:

ninjaaron
January 2nd, 2011, 07:32 AM
Me. I have a macbook and a compaq. I have Linux exclusively on both of them.

It's not even an ideological decision. Linux does everything I need and want, and it does it for free. OSX is nice, but you can't really own it like you can a linux system, though it is better for a few things, I think, than other Linux distros. Windows 7 is actually pretty sexy too, but the bloat drives me up the wall. I get the feeling it's me against the computer a lot of times with both of them. Sometimes Linux doesn't do what I want, but it always seems so genial about it... like it really wants to do it, but it just can't.
:p

No but the important reason is that I get free updates and upgrades forever and these message boards are better tech support than any of the major companies provide. It also works well on junk computers. I might get another mac one day, in the event that I am not poor. I don't actually care about your commie values so long as I have a good end-user experience and I don't have to pay. Whatever works. Linux works just as well as OSX if your not an invalid. There is one 'killer app' on mac that I can't live without called 'accordance,' a suite of Bible software. However, I can't afford the program anyway, and I manage to get my stuff done just fine with the open source alternatives (though they are not as good, at the end of the day).

I often wonder how much more productive I would be with a typewriter, however. I spend so much time tweaking whatever system I use that I rarely ever get any real work done. It's terrible.

Laryllan
January 2nd, 2011, 11:44 AM
I did.

alaukikyo
January 2nd, 2011, 12:35 PM
Always kept a dual boot for Age of Empires II.
Havee you tried wine?

alaukikyo
January 2nd, 2011, 12:40 PM
Thanks to the Ultimate Boot Disk CD I was able to save the data from a Billy box a friend has . Of course that program boots into Linux. Reminds me of why I don't do windows.
If I have to go to a never version of quick books I will buy Crossover Linux before I use windows again.

Tried GnuCash or These alternatives (http://alternativeto.net/software/quickbooks/?platform=linux&license=free)?

brew1brew
January 2nd, 2011, 07:18 PM
Wow, this is an old thread! What the heck, I'll jump in too.

I started playing with Linux in 1999 with Mandrake 6.0 or 6.1. I eventually switched to Ubuntu/Kubuntu and dropped windows completely on all my home and work PC's. I do run Virtual box for my harmony remote control.

HTMLCrazy
January 2nd, 2011, 08:46 PM
I use Ubuntu exclusively and I am only ever on windows to fix problems for other people. :cool:

puntigamer
January 2nd, 2011, 10:21 PM
I want to erase Windows but unfortunately, I'm still a gamer at heart.

Me to, but I'm using Ubuntu for a year, keeping Windows for gaming, but Indei Games are cool, and platform free :)
On Windows it is fun to play, in Linux it could be fun tu get the game running too :D

cctx005
January 3rd, 2011, 02:21 PM
I'm brand new to Linux (installed it late last week) but I can already see the appeal. I've had more fun in the last few days on the computer than I have for years (aside from gaming).

Regarding my OS history, I grew up in a MacOS house and switched to a 100% WIndows user when I went to college in the early 2000's. I needed a Windows PC for some classes and wanted the ability to play Windows games. Since switching, I've had Windows 2000, XP and Vista. To be honest, 2000 and XP weren't bad. Sure, I dealt the typical security issues, but overall I don't have negative opinions of either OS.

Vista is a another story. A couple years ago my wife and I got economy priced laptops that were lightweight so we could easily take them to school/work. From day one, Vista has been a sluggish mess. After fighting to remove all the bloatware put on the laptop by the store we bought them from, I just decided to do a clean wipe and reformat. No matter than tools or settings I use, Vista has never been a fun experience. Booting up can easily take 5 minutes from the moment I start up my laptop until all startup programs are loaded and I can actually open applications. No matter how few applications are open, iTunes sometimes takes 1-2 minutes to open up, and it often freezes for minutes at a time while syncing my iPhone. It's a disaster, yet I've put up with it for the last two years. I've thought maybe Windows 7 would fix those issues, but I haven't got a copy yet.

I've thought about trying Linux out in the past, but never actually did it. It didn't seem to be something that was all that user friendly. After just being a bit fed up with Vista, a friend mentioned that Ubuntu is a great Linux distro that beginners can get into. The installer seemed straight forward on the website so I decided to download it, burn an iso and I got started. After some time searching for tips on how to organize my partitions, I got Ubuntu up and running. With some tweaking, I now have my laptop booting within 30-45 seconds and shutting down in less than 3. I've also found some great open source alternatives to Windows software. I also have Office 2003 working in Wine (we'll see if it's stable when I start classes this semseter). I also really love the support, especially on IRC. I've had a few small issues, and practically all were fixed within minutes either via Google searches or live support on IRC. The community is amazing!

Based on my experince so far, I can see myself becoming primarily a Linux user, but not exclusively. I just can't see myself dropping Windows 100% due to the following:

1.) Netflix instant streaming
2.) Gaming...I have 10 years worth of random PC games I still play from time to time. Most of my gaming is now done on the PS3/Xbox 360, but I'd hate to eliminate the chance to play some of my favorite PC games.
3.) iTunes for iPhone syncing...as slow and crappy as iTunes is on my Vista install, I still need it to sync apps/music/books/movies/podcasts to my iPhone along with firmware updates
4.) My wife sometimes needs to use my computer and already she said she refuses to use something other than Windows. She's only ever had Windows computers and doesn't really have the interest in learning something new, even as easy as Ubuntu can be.

Overall it's been great and I look forward to learning more and being involved in this Linux world! I've even gone and downloaded some other distros to test on another laptop. It's pretty awesome how many choices we have!

Here's my setup so far

Toshiba Laptop: Ubuntu 10.10 and Vista Ultimate dual boot
Dell Laptop (more for gaming): Linux Mint/PCLinuxOS (both latest versions) and XP Professional triple boot
old HP desktop: currently just XP professional...when I get it hooked up I'm going to put Ubuntu 10.10 on it

alaukikyo
January 3rd, 2011, 03:41 PM
I also have Office 2003 working in Wine (we'll see if it's stable when I start classes this semseter). I also really love the support, especially on IRC. I've had a few small issues, and practically all were fixed within minutes either via Google searches or live support on IRC. The community is amazing!

iTunes for iPhone syncing...as slow and crappy as iTunes is on my Vista install, I still need it to sync apps/music/books/movies/podcasts to my iPhone along with firmware updates
My wife sometimes needs to use my computer and already she said she refuses to use something other than Windows. She's only ever had Windows computers and doesn't really have the interest in learning something new, even as easy as Ubuntu can be.



iTunes runs in wine:)

Also you could try the win7 transformation pack and she might not notice the difference ;)

quequotion
January 6th, 2011, 01:07 PM
Reasons why I can't completely switch to linux (GNU/Linux):

1. iTunes may run in wine, but it hardly works as well as the MacOS and Windows versions (in respective order).

2. Final Fantasy 7 & 8 work in wine according to legend and myth but I have never been able to prove this true. (These games are very, very important to me.)

3. I'm one of those people everybody comes to to fix their computer problems. Most of those people use windows; the others use MacOS. What most people don't know is I use Ubuntu to fix their Windows and MacOS computers, but I still have to do tests and updates in the native OS.

4. Bug #1 (https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+bug/1) sums up several other reasons, primarily why I can only use Linux at home.


I expect reasons 1 & 2 to be fixed (someday).

Reason 2 has been fixed as of February 2011.

Reasons 3 and 4 are more serious.

anthonyvo
January 6th, 2011, 02:08 PM
After my XP Pro crashing, because of a corrupt logon executable (one among the millions of files windows needs in order to feel happy) and having to use my neighbor's Vista Premium restore CD to get even so much as a prompt, my relationship with Windows (dating back to 3.1) was finally over.

I decided to install Ubuntu. This is going to be a beautiful relationship. Everything Windows did that I needed (I'm not a gamer,) can be done in Ubuntu. The only hangup is that it might require doing it with different software. But I'm a non-conformist anyway so there you go.

I run Mac in my recording studio, Droid on my phone, and now Ubuntu on the family PC. Everyone's happy.

oneindelijk
January 8th, 2011, 10:46 AM
I've been using all three OS'es and I certainly love the flexibility of Ubuntu, but that has a downside too (a personal one), because in Ubuntu I'm very quickly distracted when I try to fix some feature or find automated ways to do things (for example, all the settings in compiz is great, but stands for hours of distraction)
I find that MacOs is a little bit cleaner environment, improving my workflow, although at times frustrating me for missing features...

ninjaaron
January 8th, 2011, 04:02 PM
2. Final Fantasy 7 & 8 work in wine according to legend and myth but I have never been able to prove this true. (These games are very, very important to me.)

While I don't have problems with the things you found troublesome, there was one thing in particular on which I feel obligated to correct you:

Final Fantasy 8 sucks. It is unfortunate about 7 (not to mention 9), but at least the most important issue is solved: Final Fantasy III (or VI, if you like) works like a charm, as does Chrono-Trigger, Super Mario RPG, and Zelda: Link to the Past.

:P

disabledaccount
January 9th, 2011, 12:16 AM
All my computers are linux-powered for about ~2 years. I've started my linux adventure with redhat 8, but I was using windows as my primary desktop OS, starting from win3.11. That was mainly because of electronic CAD software that was unavailable for linux.

I have switched to linux only for practical reasons - now it is possible to do everything releted to electronics/programming in linux. Moreover, f.e. VHDL compilers for linux are state-of-the-art piece of software, ngspice works way faster than in windows, what is important if someone wants to run gear-5 simulation of several thousands of nodes. Worth to mention, that I have the software for free and f.e. PCB file formats are widely accepted by PCB manufacturers (KiCAD, Geda).

~6 moths ago I've created dedicated database engine (speed was the primary target) - it was written for windows, but totally made in linux - I've been able to work at home. Porting to win was easy, because wxWidgets took care about everything GUI-related :) - Literally only one line in code had to be changed in windows port. To be honest - I had to launch VM with win XP for recompilation and final pre-release testing, but that shall not count as linux betrayal (I think :) )

Gaming: my children (2) are playing flash games, but I've also installed many games in wine - f.e. Diablo2, all versions of UT, FEAR, Falluot3, and even Crysis Warhead (which is poorly playable) - not so bad generally :)

JohnPta
January 15th, 2011, 09:39 AM
I switched over in, I think 2007. The only reason why I still have WinXP on a separate hard disk is to update my GPS, TomTom. For the rest only Ubuntu. I do have now and than a fight with Ubuntu. But that keeps my brains going and besides that I like a challenge. I tried to get the TOMTOM going on Wine and Virtual Box but no success and gave up after 3 months of trying/fighting. For me only one OS,Ubuntu.

oneindelijk
January 15th, 2011, 01:04 PM
I switched over in, I think 2007. The only reason why I still have WinXP on a separate hard disk is to update my GPS, TomTom. For the rest only Ubuntu. I do have now and than a fight with Ubuntu. But that keeps my brains going and besides that I like a challenge. I tried to get the TOMTOM going on Wine and Virtual Box but no success and gave up after 3 months of trying/fighting. For me only one OS,Ubuntu.
What issues are you having with TOMTOM in a virtualbox ?

exidas
January 15th, 2011, 02:20 PM
I would like to use Ubuntu as my primary system, but its still not possible, cause there some programs i need to use at work and there is no way to run them in Ubuntu. For example Photoshop (Gimp is good but it couldn't be compared) and other programs in Adobe packs. But its true that i'm visiting windows 7 only in the last cases :)

WorfSOM
January 15th, 2011, 04:41 PM
At the moment I am 100% Ubuntu, albeit as much because of circumstance as anything else.

I am getting by fine really, although I am getting withdrawal symptoms from lack of Photoshop etc.:D

kn0w-b1nary
January 15th, 2011, 06:00 PM
Xubuntu is the only reason i have a computer, xp doesn't work well on 512mb of RAM. Xubuntu works like a charm. Good bye Windows, i will never miss your vulns, bugs, sluggishness, patch tuesday, virus's, and - dare i say - cost!

nmyrick
January 15th, 2011, 07:50 PM
I switched over in, I think 2007. The only reason why I still have WinXP on a separate hard disk is to update my GPS, TomTom. For the rest only Ubuntu. I do have now and than a fight with Ubuntu. But that keeps my brains going and besides that I like a challenge. I tried to get the TOMTOM going on Wine and Virtual Box but no success and gave up after 3 months of trying/fighting. For me only one OS,Ubuntu.
What you need to do in order to get Virtual Box with full functionality is download it from here.

http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads

The one that is in the repositories doesn't have full functionality. Once you install this, and also install Virtual Box Guest Additions, you shouldn't have any problems with installing your TomTom software and accessing it.

nmyrick
January 15th, 2011, 08:04 PM
You probably need to install the full version of VirtualBox. The version in the repositories does not give you all of the functionality, especially as far as accessing things connected to your USB ports.

Here is the link: http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads

You may need to install VirtualBox Guest Additions also.

nmyrick
January 15th, 2011, 08:07 PM
I switched over in, I think 2007. The only reason why I still have WinXP on a separate hard disk is to update my GPS, TomTom. For the rest only Ubuntu. I do have now and than a fight with Ubuntu. But that keeps my brains going and besides that I like a challenge. I tried to get the TOMTOM going on Wine and Virtual Box but no success and gave up after 3 months of trying/fighting. For me only one OS,Ubuntu.
You probably need to install the full version of VirtualBox. The version in the repositories does not give you all of the functionality, especially as far as accessing things connected to your USB ports.

Here is the link: http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads

You may need to install VirtualBox Guest Additions also.

pcardout
January 16th, 2011, 01:20 AM
I have not used Windows in 4 years! I do my research, teach my classes, give scientific talks and write papers, do family photos, use my iPod clone (don't use an iPod with Linux) without ever needing to boot windows. I love it and I think I spend more time producing and less time booting and updating and virus checking!!!

WorfSOM
January 16th, 2011, 10:24 AM
I have not used Windows in 4 years! I do my research, teach my classes, give scientific talks and write papers, do family photos, use my iPod clone (don't use an iPod with Linux) without ever needing to boot windows. I love it and I think I spend more time producing and less time booting and updating and virus checking!!!

I take my hat off to you. As much as I love Linux I don't think I could go that long without using Windows for some reason or another.

PhatKnacker
March 1st, 2011, 12:20 AM
I have 6 machines 5 of which run various versions of windows, this laptop has run ubuntu for about 2 years I use this for using open office, and for using the Internet (and ftp client). If i needed it for anything else I would install windows without a second thought. I did try using ubuntu on all my machines at first but the cost in time was just not worth it, I wasted about 300 in lost work time trying to get simple stuff working that just worked with windows. when it did work it just wasn't as good.
those of you that have a windows machine and a linux one try using a voip program in both the difference in quality is shocking free is not always cheaper.
that said I'm still using this for simple stuff and like it.

Witch Lady
March 1st, 2011, 12:25 AM
I don't use Linux exclusively and do not intend ever to run it exclusively at last not untill Asian MMOs will be available on Linux (which is hardly possible).

PhatKnacker
March 1st, 2011, 12:31 AM
I have not used Windows in 4 years! I do my research, teach my classes, give scientific talks and write papers, do family photos, use my iPod clone (don't use an iPod with Linux) without ever needing to boot windows. I love it and I think I spend more time producing and less time booting and updating and virus checking!!!

hmmm My main machine boots into windows 7 within 10 seconds (it is only turned off at the start of each month anyway, and only then if it needs to restart for updates) In the 12 months I have used it I havet noticed it virus checking once, It does the virus check when the screen saver kicks in at night when I'm asleep.

I have noticed ubuntu has to have far more updates and restars than my other machines.

nmyrick
March 1st, 2011, 03:15 AM
PhatKnacker,

Have you tried Skype on Ubuntu? It works great!

Also, I see that you are running Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron. You should try comparing apples to apples and run Ubuntu 10.04LTS or 10.10 compared to Windows 7. They are very comparable and cost nothing.

True, you have to search for software to run on Ubuntu, and many things written for Windows won't run on Ubuntu. But that's only because many of the companies that write the software don't write it for Ubuntu. That is not the fault of Ubuntu or the open source community, that's the fault of the software vendors. Hopefully, as more people start to use Ubuntu, that will be less of an issue.

Cracklepop
March 1st, 2011, 03:25 AM
... I have noticed ubuntu has to have far more updates and restars than my other machines.

Ubuntu never, ever has to be restarted, except for kernel upgrades. Windows has to be restarted even after installation of some applications.
I haven't used Windows at all for the last 5 years, Linux only.

amjain
March 1st, 2011, 03:28 AM
I got rid of windows. Still have a XP installation in virtual box but hardly use it. But then, under virtual box I have a repository of OS :)

fyfe54
March 1st, 2011, 02:19 PM
Ubuntu for everything except Turbotax - I run XP in Virtualbox for that. As soon as Turbotax has a Linux version, XP is GONE.

Garthhh
March 1st, 2011, 05:30 PM
PhatKnacker,

Have you tried Skype on Ubuntu? It works great!

Also, I see that you are running Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron. You should try comparing apples to apples and run Ubuntu 10.04LTS or 10.10 compared to Windows 7. They are very comparable and cost nothing.

True, you have to search for software to run on Ubuntu, and many things written for Windows won't run on Ubuntu. But that's only because many of the companies that write the software don't write it for Ubuntu. That is not the fault of Ubuntu or the open source community, that's the fault of the software vendors. Hopefully, as more people start to use Ubuntu, that will be less of an issue.

Google voice works well too.
I just used my VB to do my taxes, I also use it occasionally to restore an Ipod back to factory settings

when you use ubuntu you have to get used to searching the software center for apps, there is generally a program to fit your needs
with 10.10 the installer works with many outside programs too, the archive manager will just open to deal with many of the compressed formats

amx401
March 1st, 2011, 11:11 PM
I've completely had linux on every other computer since switching, but bought a new laptop that came with Windows 7. While windows is the bane of my technical existence, I am dual booting for one reason, and one reason alone:

Media Player is better at handling free . . . um . . . online adult content. Just can't get the same results out of vlc or mplayer.

Also, kind of pissed at Netflix because they refuse to stream to linux. (If you're streaming online, who cares what OS you have!)

IWantFroyo
March 1st, 2011, 11:19 PM
I never use Windows personally, and I would overwrite all the Windows computers in the house if my family would let me. I wonder why they even bother sticking with it. Things my family have said about the Windows boxes:
"Uhh, *my name censored by CIA*, why did the screen just go blue?"
"****! Not another update!"
"I've already reinstalled Adobe Reader twice! Why can't I just view this .pdf?"
Honestly. It would save me a world of pain...

panderohit
March 1st, 2011, 11:47 PM
Me and my mum. I have Windows 7 as a virtual machine exclusively to manage my iPod through iTunes.

lou002
March 2nd, 2011, 12:17 AM
Switched to Linux when my Windows 7 machine went ungenuine and Acer as well as Microsoft refused to fix it.

The only thing that's hard is getting my iPod Touch 4th gen to work in 10.10, otherwise Ubuntu is perfect!

Copper Bezel
March 2nd, 2011, 12:27 AM
Also, kind of pissed at Netflix because they refuse to stream to linux. (If you're streaming online, who cares what OS you have!)

They only stream to systems they can control, for DRM purposes. Android's supposedly getting Netflix shortly, though.

I'm all like, whatevs, saves me $8 a month. = )


Google voice works well too.

Enough that I wonder why I'm still paying for Skype outgoing landline service. It's very nice. I do most of my calling from my GMail box.


Ubuntu never, ever has to be restarted, except for kernel upgrades. Windows has to be restarted even after installation of some applications.
I haven't used Windows at all for the last 5 years, Linux only.

This was actually the last straw with Windows for me. It jumped into a security update that forced it to restart in the middle of what I was doing, which was finishing up an essay for class. I've been very happy with Ubuntu ever since. Part of why I don't even think of dual booting - I don't think Windows is a poor OS, especially in 7, which is by all rights competitive with everything else, but I don't personally feel like I can trust it.

slooksterpsv
March 2nd, 2011, 04:30 AM
...
"I've already reinstalled Adobe Reader twice! Why can't I just view this .pdf?"
Honestly. It would save me a world of pain...

I use Foxit on Windows, Adobe makes system too slow.

Regarding the updates, yeah, my DVD ROM drive went out on my PC; SP1 won't install, it tells me to reboot and if a reboot doesn't work to reinstall.

Yeah I don't need Windows, I do everything on Linux, and VBox XP for Netflix.

--When I install Windows on my machines I get pissed cause I try to play something and it says I need this update, so it downloads an update and I reboot, then it says I need another, it installs another, and I have to reboot. Then I install a game, and it needs an update, and I reboot, and then the update that it installed will now allow for the game to update so I need to reboot after that update, and it just becomes a mess.

Up with Linux, Down with Windows.

xXOtherPeoplesWasteXx
March 2nd, 2011, 07:32 AM
I have my main machine strictly running Linux. (ubuntu 10.10)
My backup machine dualboots, only have Windows(7) on it to better manage my Iphone.

Darned you Itunes!!!

cazazo
March 2nd, 2011, 02:13 PM
Well, I'm using only Ubuntu and Mint for about one year and a half! Love it and have encouraging people to do so!
My experience has not been the most smooth one, unfortunately! If your primary language isn't English and you have to configure your system to use the "" it's a pain! If you decide to have a Canon MP495, you will have to suffer in order to get it working and not having all the features in place.
If you have an Iphone... forget about it! Few webcams are suitable (in full capacity) for Linux and if you have family overseas (as I do) and wish to see them using Skype or pidgin not having a crash your lucky!
What about if you used to Photoshop? I understand we have GIMP, but I had to learn from scratch to be able to use it.
Don't get me wrong, I DO LOVE UBUNTU, that's why I'm using it every day, but I still see a lot of challenges ahead to be conquered! I would love to see an "ordinary" user migrating from Windows to Ubuntu without all that pain!
LET'S GO UBUNTU... CONTINUE TO MAKE HISTORY!:D

simpleblue
March 2nd, 2011, 07:59 PM
I had replied to this thread about a year or two ago. I'm still using Linux and loving it. :P

Every now and then I come across a Windows computer and am affirmed once again why I'll never go back. I'm sick of the Ads, Viruses, and restrictions, and the many programs that try to dupe you into paying for the software or persistently use popup ads.

ticopelp
March 2nd, 2011, 08:05 PM
Coming up on four years and counting of Ubuntu and nothing but Ubuntu!

mips
March 2nd, 2011, 09:16 PM
I use Foxit on Windows, Adobe makes system too slow.

I noticed the other day while browsing that Foxit also has a PDF Reader for Linux. Never tried it though.

http://www.foxitsoftware.com/pdf/desklinux/

Dry Lips
March 3rd, 2011, 12:19 AM
I guess I have a dirty little secret called XP... ;) I'd never tried
Linux until a couple of weeks ago. Now I'm using Ubuntu all the
time, XP is my backhand OS just in case I screw something up.
I seriously consider going solo with Ubuntu, the only thing that
keeps me back, is that I've got at least one program that isn't
doing too well in Wine. (A lack of drivers for my printer is also
an issue...) I've just gotten a new computer, and after just a few
weeks of installing a whole bunch of software, Windows crashes
so often it really ought to be re-installed. On the other hand,
Ubuntu runs very smoothly.

Garthhh
March 3rd, 2011, 12:32 AM
I guess I have a dirty little secret called XP... ;) I'd never tried
Linux until a couple of weeks ago. Now I'm using Ubuntu all the
time, XP is my backhand OS just in case I screw something up.
I seriously consider going solo with Ubuntu, the only thing that
keeps me back, is that I've got at least one program that isn't
doing too well in Wine. (A lack of drivers for my printer is also
an issue...) I've just gotten a new computer, and after just a few
weeks of installing a whole bunch of software, Windows crashes
so often it really ought to be re-installed. On the other hand,
Ubuntu runs very smoothly.

A virtual box may solve that problem

uaebuntu
March 3rd, 2011, 11:18 AM
I was doing something really important (work for money!) when my brand new lenovo N200 decided to have a BSOD... the MBR was totally gone, the lenovo rescue disks were in Yemen (and I wasn't). Desperate to get to my data I tried booting from an 8.04 CD I had around. It worked like a charm and I recovered the data and finished my work on another desktop PC I had. However I was intrigued by Linux and did a full install on one machine, loved it and then as I became more confident moved all my machines (5) to Linux, now on 10.10 and loving it. At first used dual boot then moved to VMPlayer and now rarely use it.

Linux for people who want to know why their PC works
MAC OSX for people who don't want to know why their PC works
MSDOS for people who want to know why their PC doesn't work
Windows for people who don't want to know why their PC doesn't work

kristian.kroflin
March 3rd, 2011, 12:25 PM
I switched completely - especially after I measured that Ubuntu (10.04 LTS) needs half the Watts/hour Windows (tried XP, Vista and 7) needs on the same notebook.

Dry Lips
March 3rd, 2011, 03:33 PM
A virtual box may solve that problem
I'm sorry for asking, (I'm a noob) but what is the difference
between using VirtualBox and having a dual-boot system?

Do you install Windows within VirtualBox, or is it more of an
emulator? Could you install drivers for your printer in VirtualBox?

uaebuntu
March 3rd, 2011, 04:24 PM
A dual boot system means you run windows OR ubuntu both native, sitting side by side on the system, I suppose it gives maximum performance however it (IMHO) makes a mess of your disk partitions, ans as you have to preallocate the size of the partitions as your Linux usage grows you may run out of space. Also Linux has the beauty of not needing to know about individual hard drives, but windows does, so your HDD gets partitioned for both. File sharing from Linux system to Windows is possible and easy, however I am not sure how windows copes the other way with EXT based filestores.

VirtualBox (and other virtual machines, such as VMware) hosts windows as a virtual machine which means it runs under the Linux OS, so all the drivers etc should work in the windows environment. The storage is not a problem, I back by windows VM up so I can throw the current instance away and start with a fresh known system every time I start up, so no worries about security, malware viruses etc. although I do maintain my AV on the windows system.

The one to watch is Wine which is an emulator, and although most popular hardware is supported without more details it can't be guaranteed.

I started with dual boot for safety, tried Wine with little success, and then moved to a virtual machine environment, then like my appendix Windows withered away. I did however have to use it today as I had to see a website that only supported IE, there are still some in existance!

Garthhh
March 3rd, 2011, 04:28 PM
I'm sorry for asking, (I'm a noob) but what is the difference
between using VirtualBox and having a dual-boot system?

Do you install Windows within VirtualBox, or is it more of an
emulator? Could you install drivers for your printer in VirtualBox?

you didn't say exactly what program you need windows for?
you can find VirtualBox OSE on Unbuntu Software Center
I have a WinXP VB & it will run in a different window, so I can switch back & forth without having to reboot. I use it for a website that will only work with Internet Explorer to enter timecards & workorders....
you may need a full version
http://www.virtualbox.org/
which has a few more features, you can upgrade to the full version from the OSE version
you need to install the Extension pack if you want to connect to USB devices
I have a fully updated, security installed XP VB, which I have saved as an appliance, I can install on another computer from a flashdrive in 15 minutes or so

Dry Lips
March 3rd, 2011, 05:57 PM
Garthhh & uaebuntu

Thanks for your help guys! Now I've installed VB 4.0.4
plus the extension pack. Seems like it allows me to install
XP within a Virtual Box, right? But I do already run a dual-boot
system with XP and Ubuntu, and it tells me it is creating
a virtual hard disk as the boot hard disk of the virtual machine...
Now, It won't mess up my grub, right?
(I just had to ask to be sure).

Copper Bezel
March 3rd, 2011, 06:52 PM
Right, because it's not touching the "real" hard drive - the virtual drive is a file within your Linux filesystem.

You can't install a printer in the Windows guest OS through OSE, but you can through the full version, so good choice. = ) Most USB devices can be installed directly to the Windows guest by bridging the USB interface to the virtual machine. (Not all. VB has no support, for instance, for installing wireless devices, so folks with Windows-only 3G cards, for instance, would be out of luck.)

Dry Lips
March 3rd, 2011, 07:05 PM
All right then, I'll give it a try! :)

Omegus
March 3rd, 2011, 07:12 PM
I read about Ubuntu while I had some free time when I was in Afghanistan and I wanted to try it out. When I got home after my tour I dual booted with my vista and after 3 days to getting used to the system, I dropped windows like it was hot. I love Ubuntu and now I try and convince all my work buddies to do the same. I bought a Brand spanking new computer and it solely runs Ubuntu Maverick . My next project is to get a Multitouch Table and run Ubuntu on that.

jaeddu
March 3rd, 2011, 08:41 PM
i am testing ubuntu and kubuntu in oracle boxes. i would like to lose windows, but im still trying to figure out linux. so we'll see how it goes. all the noob guides i've read dont answer the question that plagues me. I'm trying to get seamless mode worjing but i am unable to mount or excute or something. the search continues.

Dry Lips
March 3rd, 2011, 08:46 PM
i am testing ubuntu and kubuntu in oracle boxes. i would like to lose windows, but im still trying to figure out linux. so we'll see how it goes. all the noob guides i've read dont answer the question that plagues me. I'm trying to get seamless mode worjing but i am unable to mount or excute or something. the search continues.Don't give up mate! You can get a lot of help here on the forum.
I think everyone who has switched to linux from windows, probably
have encountered a few problems along the way... I'm still figuring
things out!

Dry Lips
March 3rd, 2011, 10:55 PM
VirtualBox: Now I'm running XP in the background.
One comment: Spooky!

desnaike
March 3rd, 2011, 11:11 PM
I have run Ubuntu exclusively since Dapper Drake.

DatabaseDiva
March 4th, 2011, 01:00 AM
I switched from Windows to Suse in 2004, and from Suse to Ubuntu in 2008. I still have an old HP Pavilion from 2006 that dual boots Suse 10 and Windows XP. I use it for iTunes. When it finally dies, I'll replace it with a Mac mini.

Garthhh
March 4th, 2011, 04:04 AM
VirtualBox: Now I'm running XP in the background.
One comment: Spooky!
yesterday I was running a VB on the computer in my home office, through a remote desktop, while I sat on my deck on a wireless notebook :)
another time I accidentally opened up a VB from within a VB
I think a saw the edge of the universe for a second....
seriously I save the machine state with IE open so I don't even have to wait for XP to boot up

mamamia88
March 4th, 2011, 04:30 AM
i just completely wiped windows 7 off my netbook today and put 10.10 on it. i had gone away from it because of a bug where i couldn't connect to my wifi. Well today I reinstalled and it still had same bug but after installing all the updates it works great. I dualboot 10.04 and win 7 on my laptop but the only time i've booted into windows in months was for the sole purpose to find out whether i was having a hardware problem or a driver problem

marl30
March 4th, 2011, 05:36 AM
i just completely wiped windows 7 off my netbook today and put 10.10 on it. i had gone away from it because of a bug where i couldn't connect to my wifi. Well today I reinstalled and it still had same bug but after installing all the updates it works great. I dualboot 10.04 and win 7 on my laptop but the only time i've booted into windows in months was for the sole purpose to find out whether i was having a hardware problem or a driver problem

Love your sig, it says it all. :)

Well, I believe next month will be my first anniversary with Ubuntu. I think it was about in June though when I wiped Windows 7 off, and have been running Ubuntu happily ever since. I still have an old copy of XP that I had running in Virtualbox. I just need it for a few not too frequent reasons. Some times a month goes by without me having to log into XP. Ubuntu does all for me.:)

robgraves
March 4th, 2011, 02:08 PM
i haven't booted into windows since i put on ubuntu

Dry Lips
March 4th, 2011, 02:19 PM
Garthhh wrote:

another time I accidentally opened up a VB from within a VB
I think a saw the edge of the universe for a second....
Mindblowing! (LOL) But seriously, I like that you have the
possibility of checking out other Linux distros that way.

(I'm not planning to switch from Ubuntu though, as it fit
my needs perfectly) :)

cygnus-X1
March 4th, 2011, 04:52 PM
Three things are stopping me from a full switch...


Gaming. (RTS - RA2:Yuri's Revenge, Generals:Zero Hour, etc.)

Video Recording/Editing (MythTV too complicated and no time to read instruction "Bible". VirtualdubMod, Super, CODEC installations? Only thing I've gotten to work in Wine is Imgburn.)

Installation of programs without having to constantly use CLI to either start up or tweak to force things to work, (more like fail to work). If I install something, I expect it to set up its own menu selection/icon.


Though Linux is very stable and powerful, it is still living up to its stereotype of being a PITA to the AVERAGE user. Most people do not have the time (or patience) to relearn how the wheel operates. It also doesn't help that you now cannot launch anything from a CD/DVD any more because of the draconian measures taken by Devs to "avoid potential infection." (If we put in a disc, it's OUR choice to do so.) Until developers and programmers can get past this techy superiority complex, Linux will unfortunately never be a serious threat to win-don'ts. So until that happens, Linux will be a great choice for people who either are so highly trained that they can recompile a kernel in their sleep, or people who just surf the web, check emails and watch videos on youtube. And maybe hit the torrents.

10.04LTS(64) with AMD X2, Gigabyte mobo with ATI video and HD sound.
---

t3s7a
March 4th, 2011, 08:22 PM
I don't use Win for some months now, and I don't expect to go back.
Of course there is the gaming issue, and all the CLI (interesting) mumbo jumbo...
But lets face it, Unix is where all the fun is

cblnchat
March 5th, 2011, 10:38 AM
I JUST today switched from XP to Ubuntu 10.10. And its the best decision ever! I love it! Now that im into Linux im looking into other linux OSs just to see whats out there :)
Go ubuntu and linux!!!

maqtanim
March 5th, 2011, 11:12 AM
For couple of years, Ubuntu is my sole OS! I use ubuntu for all my works. Currently I am using Lucid.

Nkosi
March 5th, 2011, 11:21 AM
Just Ubuntu on a System76 laptop for 4 years now. No viruses. No meltdowns. No money for software. No regrets.

rva1945
March 5th, 2011, 05:54 PM
I want to erase Windows but unfortunately, I'm still a gamer at heart.


Me.

MasterNetra
March 5th, 2011, 05:58 PM
What's amazing is that this thread is still going with over 7612 posts and growing. And it started back in 2004.

Garthhh
March 5th, 2011, 06:03 PM
What's amazing is that this thread is still going with over 7612 posts and growing. And it started back in 2004.

I find it to be a deviation of the absolute beginner section
sometimes a bit of advice is in order;)

Quake
March 5th, 2011, 08:03 PM
What's amazing is that this thread is still going with over 7612 posts and growing. And it started back in 2004.

When I created this thread, I had no idea it was going to survive close to 7 years! :p

johntaylor1887
March 5th, 2011, 08:04 PM
I only keep windows around for a couple of games that won't run in wine, but other than that, it's ubuntu for everything else.

When I created this thread, I had no idea it was going to survive close to 7 years! :p
What I find amazing is you only have 60 posts in 7 years! I take it you pretty much stay in the cafe where posts don't count.

Quake
March 5th, 2011, 08:06 PM
Just to update my situation, it's not different from 2004. I have Windows 7 now that I use exclusively for games. But Linux is my main OS.

GWBouge
March 5th, 2011, 08:24 PM
SO close, but not quite, and I don't see it happening any time soon. I've removed Windows completely a time or two, but unfortunately I'm an avid sim-racer, and Windows has better support for my wheel and is the only platform supported by my poison of choice.

Windows 7 - iRacing, AfterWorld updates
Ubuntu 10.10 - Everything else

SOBravo
March 5th, 2011, 11:03 PM
I just go so fed up with (broken) Windows. I completely removed it from my system. If I can't find something in Linux, then I don't need it!

Hippytaff
March 5th, 2011, 11:04 PM
Just Linux ;-)

DAB4970
March 5th, 2011, 11:09 PM
I started using SuSe about 10 yrs ago but it didn't last long because of issues with dual-booting on the desktop at the time. About 1 yr ago I learned about Ubuntu from a former high school class mate and have been running it ever since as my main OS. I had to re-install Windows because of school (ITT Tech), so Windows is only used for school purposes. The issues with Ubuntu on my laptop are minor, so I can just deal with them until they are fixed in newer releases (after Lucid). For now, I just stick with the LTS versions.:smile:

:guitar::KS

keithgroben
March 6th, 2011, 12:39 AM
I've been completely using Ubuntu for about 6 months now. It is fabulous. One by one I've been saving my computers with a sparkling clean install of the latest release!:P

neslot
March 6th, 2011, 11:07 PM
Switched to dual boot Linux and windows in 98. in 2000, strictly linux, as I never used windows. Have been on Ubuntu since Warty Warthog. Currently running Lucid on 64 bit machine, 2 monitors. Shutdown is about 12 seconds, and start from power on is about 1 minute 15 seconds. Like that speed! Cannot remember the last time I froze it, but was doing something stupid in about '04. I do have VM on here and can get to XP, but that hasn't happened for a couple of years.
I like the fact that any installation of software requires a password from me to install.

My $.02

Tony Olsen

rosenkavalier
March 6th, 2011, 11:14 PM
not much hd space, so I never went dual boot. started using ubuntu last 2009, then a brief switch back to Win7, then back to linux since march 2010 until now.

mm... I also have chuck running on vbox for my networking club training

user333
March 6th, 2011, 11:19 PM
I pretty much don't use windows unless I have to. I mostly use Ubuntu or Mint,(sometimes puppy linux too) and as a last resort I boot up windows, for hardware that hasn't gotten linux drivers yet, or for some commercial programs I need to use, that have to Linux alternative -- yet :)

cblnchat
March 7th, 2011, 01:54 AM
I just the other day completely over to Ubuntu 10.10. Im a gamer, but i just got so tired of my XP portion crashing and being painfully slow! So i did it! And im loving it!

pcdude2143
March 7th, 2011, 08:28 AM
I've been almost 100% Linux for two years now. I will occasionally switch to Windows to bridge a desktop I'm fixing to the wireless. Recently I followed a TI calculator programming guide and had to use Windows temporarily (I later found a compiler that works with Mono). CHKDSK has corrupted the drive so many times (surprisingly bad, even for Windows) that I mostly gave up trying to use Windows at all.

mmsmc
March 7th, 2011, 08:36 AM
the only windows computers in the house are my moms and sisters, and even they are dual booted

spookiedoom
March 8th, 2011, 08:25 PM
i completely switched to Linux - but i bought an xbox for gaming. so, it's kind of a draw.

cupof
March 9th, 2011, 03:17 AM
I have been using ubuntu 10.10 (my first linux os) foe about 2 months now, and absolutely love it! its great. unfortunately i have a photography class this semester of high school, and we have to use xp. i now know why people go away from microsoft, its to slow, and looks awful.

hilikus lnf
March 9th, 2011, 03:28 PM
i completely switched to Linux - but i bought an xbox for gaming. so, it's kind of a draw.

Think this is the way forward for gamers. ;)

I would love to go 100% ubuntu but video editing/playback keeps me goin back to Win or my MBP.

Just ordered an Acer Revo3700 to run Ubuntu and XBMC as a HTPC.

yanes
March 9th, 2011, 07:18 PM
I switched to Linux , for one reason : I HATE CAPITALISM AND SOFTWARE MONOPOLISM ! ,
I DON'T LIKE TO GIVE MY MONEY TO MS
with Linux , you are in very nice communauty that is ready to help you , with pleasure ! :)

Koffeehaus
March 9th, 2011, 07:37 PM
The only reason I still dualboot with Windows is:

1) Dreamweaver
2) Photoshop

Once they go native on Linux (I mean the latest versions, not prehistorical junk like with Skype), I'll drop Windows altogether.

And once a Linux distro addresses the issues with wireless, sound and video shaders I'll never think of Microsoft again.

annu2127
March 9th, 2011, 07:41 PM
i am not "very old" with ubuntu....but from my first touch of ubuntu, i loved it..& from last 2 years i am not using any other operating system other than ubuntu at all......to be honest i have windows installed on my laptop but still i don't remember when i have booted it last time.....i am a software developer by passion & profession and hate gaming.....may be this is the reason...

agberg
March 12th, 2011, 11:21 PM
I switched two years ago and never looked back. Though sometimes I can't get a video to play, such as this one...
I'm using Ubuntu 10.04 and have Quicktime, but no dice...

http://www.weatherbell.com/jb/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/2011-03-09-2111.mov

cakmakli
March 12th, 2011, 11:52 PM
Right now I run Ubuntu from an external HD. I only boot to Windows once or twice a week. I'm going to switch completely over real soon

beew
March 12th, 2011, 11:57 PM
The only thing that forces me to keep an XP partition is SAS. Need it for work. Otherwise I don't log into Windows at all.

deconstrained
March 13th, 2011, 12:03 AM
I've been without Windows for at least a year. Seriously, all I ever used it for was gaming, and that got out of hand, so I had to kill it for the sake of my productivity.

mrgs
March 13th, 2011, 04:28 AM
The only thing that forces me to keep an XP partition is SAS. Need it for work. Otherwise I don't log into Windows at all.

I wrote a guide to install SAS on Ubuntu (actually it was my first post in the forum):
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1303357

beew
March 13th, 2011, 04:43 AM
I wrote a guide to install SAS on Ubuntu (actually it was my first post in the forum):
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1303357


Thanks dude, but my employer only has license for the Windows version. Couldn't figured out how to run it in WINE. One guy claimed he did it by moving the installed SAS directory and dumping it in wine, tried that, no luck. I am exploring virtualbox but it seems pretty slow.

Garthhh
March 13th, 2011, 08:50 PM
Thanks dude, but my employer only has license for the Windows version. Couldn't figured out how to run it in WINE. One guy claimed he did it by moving the installed SAS directory and dumping it in wine, tried that, no luck. I am exploring virtualbox but it seems pretty slow.

sounds like a job for virtual box I set one up for my brother in law so he could access the internet explorer only web portal for his work. He is just entering work orders, so the difference in speed, doesn't matter much

David Andersson
March 14th, 2011, 01:11 AM
How many of you completely switched to Linux?

(Like the question "have you stopped beating your wife?" :) )

I have used computers for 30 years. I have never bought a computer (desktop, laptop, or netbook) with Microsoft Windows pre-installed. I do not have any computer with Microsoft Windows in my home (as far as I know, not sure about the refrigerator). I did have to use Microsoft WinXP (beside Sun Solaris) for years at work, but when the XP side began to dominate I quit, and I'm currently unemployed.

Xubuntu is my main os since 6.10.

Danw12
March 14th, 2011, 02:02 AM
Its been a while guys! :)
My last post on this thread was back on page 468! :P

About a year and a half ago I wrote:

there are 5 computers in my house, (3 are mine)

On My 3:

On PC one: Ubuntu Server 8.10
On PC two: Windows XP, Windows 7 BETA, Kubuntu 8.10
On My Laptop: Win XP & Ubuntu 8.10


Others Are Running XP & Vista


Well, that's changed a lot now!
A more up-to-date list:

On PC one: [DEAD] :(
On PC two: Windows Server 2008
On My Laptop: [DEAD] :(
New(er) Laptop: Windows 7 Home Premium
On PC three: Was Ubuntu 10, now Dead. :(



So at this moment, I'm not using Linux :(, but I have plans to install Ubuntu once again when I revive one of the old systems. :P

Nice to see you all again! :KS

LungFungus
March 14th, 2011, 03:24 AM
98.9% linux user

i very occasionally boot up win7 to play a game or something. started playing with ubuntu about three years ago. my laptop has been windows free since then, only recently did i switch my desktop over.

run Arch on my laptop, and buntu/ Mint Debian on my desktop
hoooorrrraaaayyy

Segofam
March 14th, 2011, 12:06 PM
I am not an Ubuntu/Linux elitist, but I only use Ubuntu now.
My PC - God bless is soul - is on it's way to the promised land after 10 years of private and work use. When I put it together, xp was loaded, then when Vista came along, that particular point in time sent me searching for a new op, that's when I found Linux. So I searched for a Linux op that suited me and I found Ubuntu after trying about half a dozen others.
Had Win 7 came along earlier, I may not have searched for another op, but there you have it. I did load Win 7 Enterprise onto the pc, and it has been great, but by then I had achieved all I needed to do and more with Ubuntu on my Latop. But my goodness that was a learning kerb, especially the command line, which I still enjoy running around.
I recommend that if you are trying Ubuntu or any Linux op, keep searching and trying for a few months before giving up, you may be surprised at just how much you can achieve and more with Ubuntu/Linux.
Sincerely,
Scott

Extended_Monad
March 14th, 2011, 12:25 PM
I have used Linux on my laptops since 2006, and I duel-boot my desktops; one with win xp/ubuntu, the other win 7/ubuntu. I use windows for gaming and writing papers with special formating. But, for everything else I use Linux. :D

shoosy
March 14th, 2011, 01:31 PM
I am getting there barley using windows not only for the occasional game or 2 and for the lans i goto

smileyacid
March 14th, 2011, 02:03 PM
Got to have a Windows machine for college/work before then i dual booted but personally i only use Ubuntu (or Kubuntu now) for personal stuff i.e. browsing etc.

Copper Bezel
March 14th, 2011, 03:39 PM
(Like the question "have you stopped beating your wife?" :) )

I have used computers for 30 years. I have never bought a computer (desktop, laptop, or netbook) with Microsoft Windows pre-installed. I do not have any computer with Microsoft Windows in my home (as far as I know, not sure about the refrigerator). I did have to use Microsoft WinXP (beside Sun Solaris) for years at work, but when the XP side began to dominate I quit, and I'm currently unemployed.

Xubuntu is my main os since 6.10.

You still switched to Linux at some point, since you'd have been using Unix before '91. = )

kailkitsune
March 16th, 2011, 02:45 PM
I learned about Ubuntu early 2009, I installed Ubuntu 9.04 in dual-boot with winxp for a while. It stayed that way for about year. Then windows7 came about, I REALLY liked win7 it was friendly and easy to use. That ALL changed in November 2010, I was doing something(can't really remember) that reminded me of the fun i had playing with Ubuntu, so i thought id dual-boot with win7. i installed Ubuntu 10.04 in a small partition(about 24gigs) to get used to it again. win7 had a ****-fit, i had to fix the boot loader, use a recovery disk because it had an unrecoverable error( really don't get it i have a 160gb Raptor drive and was only using 80ish gigs), after i thought id fixed every thing and logged into windows ALL of my files where gone(the recovery said that would NOT happen), I raged and broke my mouse........(i really liked that mouse too)
So here I am using Ubuntu solo for about 4 months with no want, desire, or need for windows(the hate for the self proclaimed god of OS's is appeased by this too)

plus the community for Ubuntu is awesome, if you don't know someone will on here will, I've learned way more than i thought possible, making Ubuntu my main and only OS for a long time to come.

ChipOManiac
March 17th, 2011, 02:47 PM
I made the complete change after G.C.E. O.L.'s. I was an Ubuntu user since 2006 and loved every single bit of it, the coustomization, freedom, and explorative nature, and everything else. I actually did my G.C.E. A.L. Computer Science project on Kubuntu on GAMBAS... (but I think the lecture in Singhalese language was a little too much for them :P)...

I've loved this experience, and I wouldn't want to turn back... sure I miss NFS and all... but I like this exploration and community better...

Microsoft Windows (TM) free since 2009 and climbing... :)

Welly Wu
March 17th, 2011, 04:39 PM
Let me tell you my story.

I own an ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC with 8.00 GB of DDR3 SODIMM SDRAM from Crucial and an Intel 2nd Generation 34nm 160.00 GB Solid State Drive. I was a die hard Microsoft fan and I own a fully licensed copy of Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit along with Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2010 64 bit including Project Professional 2010 64 bit and Visio Professional 2010 64 bit.

Last weekend, I tried to backup my Intel SSD using the Intel Data Migration Toolkit onto an external Seagate Momentus 7200.4 SATA-II 500.00 GB 7,200 RPM conventional hard drive that is connected to a Thermaltake BlacX SATA-I/II hard drive dock with USB 2.0 and eSATA connections. I thought the drive cloning process was successful so I decided to restore it back to my Intel SSD because I had 18.64 GB of free space after I decided to delete the system recovery and ASUS Express Gate partition. The Intel Data Migration Toolkit restored the data, but it failed to expand the C: Windows 7 partition to the maximum capacity of the Intel SSD. Furthermore, I find out that the C: Windows partition changed to drive letter D: and it is in the RAW format instead of NTFS. So, I have a bad drive image that is useless and I cannot boot into Windows 7. I lost all of my data and applications.

To make things worse, I tried to install a clean copy of Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64 bit onto my Intel SSD, but that failed as well because Windows does not see the SSD. I press SHIFT+F10 to get into the MS-DOS shell. I invoke the DISKPART utility and I wind up selecting my Intel SSD, deleting the existing MBR, cleaning it, setting it to active, and I try to re-install Windows 7, but it still does not see the Intel SSD despite the fact that my BIOS sees it.

Frustrated, I wind up downloading and burning a copy of Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat onto a blank CD-R. I pop the disc into my super-multi double layer DVD burner drive and I begin the installation process. Everything works right out of the box. The installation procedure takes less than 8 minutes to complete. I reboot into Ubuntu GNU/Linux in less than 5 seconds and I install all of my essential software packages. Then, I invoke the sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade commands. In less than two minutes, I am done and I restart in less than 4 seconds. Everything is good to go.

I did wind up installing Oracle Virtualbox and I created a 20.00 GB virtual machine for Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 32 bit. I install this operating system including Microsoft Office Professional Plus 32 bit and all of the important and optional updates including Service Pack 1 and Windows Internet Explorer 9. It takes about two and a half hours for this basic installation and update process to finally be done. I wind up installing Cafescribe's MyScribe program and I download my digital textbook since I am a graduate student at New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, New Jersey USA. I am pursuing a Masters of Science in IT Administration and Security degree program and I am studying Principles of Operating Systems right now. So, I am very familiar with Microsoft Windows, UNIX, Solaris, and Ubuntu GNU/Linux.

Though I still prefer Microsoft Windows 7 by a hair due to its wealth of software applications available, Ubuntu has it beat for simplicity, speed, security, and reliability. By choosing Ubuntu GNU/Linux, I just extended the usefulness and longevity of my ASUS N61JV-X2 notebook PC by years at no additional costs.

arun ganesh
March 17th, 2011, 05:10 PM
Man i'm cursing myself ...i just hooked to ubuntu a few months only...
Windows has bcom garbage to me....
i'm nuts

smooth_jamie
March 17th, 2011, 05:14 PM
I am testing XBMC with Ubuntu 10.10 for my media centre PC (currently dual boot). When I finally finish tweaking it I will move all my films (stored on my win XP machine) to my Ubuntu XBMC media computer......wipe out windows completely from the XP machine.....and install a generic Ubuntu Maverick as a general use/office PC

Hopefully I'll be windows free very soon!:)

vn.chauhan1
March 20th, 2011, 09:42 AM
I have played games enough ...now i have moved completely to ubuntu
and it has helped me a lot, as a CS student now i know how OS really works..

phoros
March 21st, 2011, 05:00 AM
Just did it.

Win7 is gone for few days completely 'cos of its updates' which caused reapeting crashes of the whole system.

Though I have to use xp in vbox sometimes (complicated music editors) it seems I should have done it long time ago... ;)

Everything works fine so far. I feel... relieved. :D

Kid-k
March 21st, 2011, 10:25 AM
I went through two failed attempts with a Dell XPS M2010 (1st time because of sound issues, 2nd lacking bb support)So I was forced back to Windows. Until a few months ago the HD died

Now I've got an Android phone that's rooted and running CM7 and I needed a new desktop, so on Friday I went and bought all the parts for a new rig ( I7 960).I had no intention of putting windows on it. In fact, I didn't even by a disk drive(I don't have any use for it).

I have now been running Ubuntu 10.10 on this sexy piece of machinery for 3 days and I can honestly say I will probably never put windows on it. ever.

el_koraco
March 21st, 2011, 01:44 PM
windoze-free for a couple of months now.

tyleruk
March 21st, 2011, 02:12 PM
Personally I have a Dual-Boot on my PC, I use Windows for gaming and Ubuntu for everything else. On my laptop I only have Ubuntu installed

peely
March 21st, 2011, 03:46 PM
Our entire house has been Windows-free for a year now, including my wife's laptop. She gets on fine with it, or at least did once I enabled backspace to go back tio the previous page in Firefox.

The only real issue we have is when an iPad / Pod needs updating, I haven;t yet found a way of doing that in Wine.

lucubrate
March 26th, 2011, 02:43 PM
Ubuntu is free and open, it will always stay that way because we want freedom when we use software and our internet.
We have to work together, so that means using Ubuntu 100%. I have just made the swap, my machine has two systems Ubuntu 10.4 and Ubuntu 10.10, its working great! I have had windows and Ubuntu, that didn't work. I have had Ubuntu and windows, that didn't work. Now I have no problems, there's something in it for everyone.
I can't say about gaming because I don't have any knowledge on that.

BigCityCat
March 26th, 2011, 02:53 PM
oops wrong thread

Gaygerbil
March 27th, 2011, 01:23 AM
Switched off Linux completely in 2008. Had it's ups and downs but overall I definitely am happy about switching completely to Linux.

vcrpex
March 27th, 2011, 06:25 AM
My 3 systems at home are all using ubuntu, just different version of it. Dualbooted one with windows xp, the other loaded windows 7 in vbox when i really need to sync my iphone or watch ppstream or pplive and one old laptop with just ubuntu 9.04. Any good live streaming software for ubuntu, please let me know. I have try sopcast before, but it doesnt work very well for my 64bit ubuntu machine, it is okay for my 32bit machine. Recently converted my dad to ubuntu as well, his machine is still on dual boot, due to the ppstream. honestly if not for the virus hit on my wife's windows machine, i will not make the jump to ubuntu. but it is the best jump ever.

leviathan8
March 27th, 2011, 08:27 AM
Switched completely to 10.04 when it has been released. Been using 9.10 until then, but not full-time user. Though my desktop computer still has Windows 7 on it as my father usually plays some games on it. On the other hand, my laptop is natively Linux. :)

vehemoth
March 27th, 2011, 08:34 AM
Switched completely to Debian, never liked the bugs and security problems in windows, got so sick off it that one day I vowed never to go back to it on my main system.

Poppyann
March 27th, 2011, 10:30 AM
I would quite like to switch completely to Ubuntu, but I do sometimes play games on Windows.
There's no problem with keeping my Ubuntu & windows 7 dual boot; it works quite well for me

FoundmyTux
March 27th, 2011, 12:26 PM
Switched to Breezy Badger in winter of '05. Have used Ubuntu or Debian testing ever since.

Ominara
March 27th, 2011, 01:33 PM
On october of 2010, tired of viruses under windows, I give it a try to ubuntu... I started with the under windows installation and doesn't work very well. I had some problems and, one month later, completely switch to linux. I started with the CD version 10.04 and a few days ago upgrade to 10.10.

I love it. It's all what I spect from a OS, Fast, Good looking, Easy to youse, low space used. And I think I will never come back this journey.

The ony thing I miss are some games. But is not the death of nobody.

everything is funny
March 28th, 2011, 05:44 AM
Just switched yesterday from vista. I was going to dual boot but my crippled system was so slow and I was too impatient to figure out the partition manager and since I had almost all my files backed up I decided to just wipe it all. I had some experience with macs and figured ubuntu wouldn't be too hard to learn. No regrets so far. I don't game so that's not a problem and if I need photoshop in the future I'll just repartition a little bit. Otherwise windows is useless to me. :D

Terry Maker
March 28th, 2011, 01:19 PM
I made the "Big Leap", about a month ago!

I still have some issues yet to be resolved, (like: "how do I share the files on my Dell dimension 3000, with my Novatech Laptop"**, and: "I can't sync my windows XDA phone to it"), but generally, I'm very pleased with the jump!

The workability is 99%, (1% deducted for the issues stated), even printing works, (I dumped my AIO922 Dell, after finding out that it was cheaper to buy a HP F2280, with all the same features, that to buy new cartridges for the Dell!)

99% functionality is a winner with me!

Terry M

**Solved this morning, 29/03/2011!

raheelsuleman
March 28th, 2011, 06:06 PM
hi it has been over 1 year now and i have completely shifted to linux. i use vlc for video google earth skype gimp(the best) inkscape and love setting up various server for projects. linux has changed my life. to be more specific ubuntu has. and it is because of the user support and forums. if they were not here i would not have been able to switch completely. yes games and modems are a weak point but now i just go and buy a modem that works. if it is games ye i miss some good games in windows but now i have mostly stopped playing games and started concentrating on learning the OS. i have setup and tested squid apache dnsmasq zoneminder proftp samba cups iptables ufw and many many more. thank you ubuntu. moreover i have started to install ubuntu in most of the machines in my office. i have become the expert here. again thanks to ubuntu

moboticdes
March 30th, 2011, 02:02 PM
I've been dual booting windows and ubuntu since 2001, but used windows only 1% of he time in case I needed something available only on windows.
In 2009 with the advent of virtualization I completely erased Windows from my computers and use 100% Linux.

Last time I needed Windows was to play Call of Duty, but I preferred to play it on a virtual xp installation on top of Ubuntu. ;)

alaukikyo
March 30th, 2011, 02:17 PM
Last time I needed Windows was to play Call of Duty, but I preferred to play it on a virtual xp installation on top of Ubuntu. ;)

you could play COD in ubuntu using playonlinux .

Sijmen
March 30th, 2011, 03:37 PM
Well, I have been using OSX for the last six years. The notebook* I ordered will be my first real linux machine in seven years. It will come with Windows 7 and I am going to fool around with it for a while. But I don't if I have any applications that can't be replaced with linux versions. Can't wait really......:(

peyre
March 30th, 2011, 05:39 PM
Ubuntu for everything except Turbotax - I run XP in Virtualbox for that. As soon as Turbotax has a Linux version, XP is GONE.

Hey, have you tried TaxAct? It doesn't have a Linux port either (or even a Mac one, unfortunately), but it's less than half the cost of TurboTax. It only costs $22 for the Ultimate Bundle (equivalent of TurboTax's Deluxe). It isn't quite as polished as TurboTax, but the difference is really minimal--the changeover was pretty seamless to me, in terms of getting used to the look and feel, which is very similar. The hardest part was that I couldn't import my previous year's TurboTax data. That was a one-time inconvenience, of course--this year I just imported my previous year's TaxAct data.

cain071546
March 31st, 2011, 12:43 AM
I ONLY USE LINUX.

I LOVE ANYTHING UBUNTU OR DEBIAN BASED
and because of WINE and others etc..........
i have NEVER FOUND a game that i can not run in Linux

I have 3 Linux machines in the house running
Debian 6 Squeeze
Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic
Mint 8 Helena

then 2 more machines that belong to my mom and roommate and dual boot windows
Ubuntu 9.10Karmic/windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
Debian 5 Lenny/Windows XP Custom embedded 32bit=1.4 gigs installed even with all updates and SP3 installed cuz ima ninja like that!


even if im running a quad core with 8 gigs ram i expect a OS to use less than 200 megs ram at boot or ill FREAK OUT!!!

I'm the kind of person who will put 20 hours into building a Linux box before i ever really do anything with it.

PZJM
April 1st, 2011, 04:54 PM
I made the leap a couple of weeks ago but over the past couple of years I had been testing Ubuntu. I love the freedom and performance of Ubuntu. However, when it comes to video editing I think Windows still has linux beat.

I've purchased the Beginning Ubuntu book to help me fill in the gaps with some of the installation and available utilities. I have mainly been testing features and software packages. Once I find everything I need/like, I will be reinstalling Ubuntu and using the applications that I found useful. I don't think I'll ever go back to Windows:D

jdneate
April 1st, 2011, 05:48 PM
I switched to Ubuntu 8.04 a couple of years ago since when I have used for almost all my computing.

I have a second machine with XP ..the only times I have used this in that time were ...
1 Completing some Word application forms where OpenOffice ended up with layout problems.
2 Manipulating photos for an ebay ad.which didn't work in Ubuntu/Firefox.
3 Opening a .docx item containing photos.

There might have been ways of doing the above without using XP but after trying various suggestions, I ran out of time.

nikRbokR
April 5th, 2011, 12:34 AM
Nope, I've not switched, and I don't see myself switching to it completely.

Frankly, I don't dislike Windows. Instead, I turned to Ubuntu/Linux mainly because it looked cool. And it is. I've been dabbling around for about 3 years before finally getting to install it onto my laptop's harddrive (external drive installations were becoming a pain).

I actually like the "simplicity" of Windows. I've been using it long enough were I find it easier to fix problems. I'm still getting accustomed to the terminal, and problems can be difficult to fix. But I figure using both isn't necessarily a bad thing.

Kraus
April 5th, 2011, 02:04 AM
I've fiddled around with Ubuntu over the past year and a half or so, I use it 98% of the time on my laptop just because of how flexible it is compared to Windows! I don't game that much on my laptop so Ubuntu is perfect for it, my main rig though is Windows 7 only at this point due to my school work and yata yata yata.

Overall, Ubuntu gets the job done for me (even though it refuses to use my External HD)

supergirlkara
April 5th, 2011, 10:17 PM
I am a gamer at heart too, and although I am glad to say I am now only a Linux user, I still have my VirtualBox to play most Windows games that I love. I am afraid however that when Diablo 3 comes out, its going to make me want to install Windows again. However I am sticking to my guns, I love Ubuntu way too much, and I am tired of being hacked in Windows. Every time you turn your head another rootkit/exploit comes out.Being a programmer I am a constant target. Ubuntu really allows me to let my freak flag fly.....Now I am a dedicated Perl developer. Although C# and .NET in Windows is getting really cool, nothing beats getting nasty with a perl script. I am in heaven.

barthus
April 6th, 2011, 11:15 PM
January last year I had the choice, as a Windows user: Shall I buy 2x Windows 7 for our laptops or buy something else that costs money (Mac ?).

I decided to convert and have now GNU/Linux - 10.10 Ubuntu for more than a year. I don't regret a second to have changed! I feel absolutely free.

EDIT: I ***-KICKED ALL WINDOWS PARTITIONS! Windows is now running in the Virtual-Box (sometimes).

Fraoch
April 7th, 2011, 03:35 PM
I've experimented around with Linux for a long time, since probably 2000.

Tried Fedora, SuSE, KNOPPIX, Mandrake and probably a few others I forgot about. None of them ever worked completely on my older testing hardware - there was always hardware components not detected, various software functions didn't work, etc. I would play with it for a bit then abandon it.

I remember ordering a Warty CD and I think I couldn't wait for it to arrive and downloaded Warty. It worked better than the rest but not well enough to convince me to switch right away. By the time I took the testing machine out again I think I updated it at least to Dapper, possibly to Edgy. That was the first time that everything worked perfectly, effortlessly, and I realized that this wasn't just a testing thing anymore, that I could use this permanently.

Not long after, my Windows XP computer failed. I rebuilt it but I couldn't recreate the RAID data on my drives because I couldn't get the same controller. I had backed up my personal data, but seeing as my program data was all gone, why not try Ubuntu? I put Edgy on my new build, and Feisty was released only days later. Worked perfectly!

When I moved, that PC was placed in a fairly inaccessible place while I used my wireless Windows XP work laptop in an office in another part of the house, so it functioned as a server for 3 years. I accessed it by ssh.

When I moved again last year I placed it in my office so I could use it full-time. I've learned a lot since then and I'm liking Ubuntu Linux more all the time. Looking forward to Natty now!

I haven't updated my testing machine in a while, I think it's still running Gutsy. I still have my first PC which I believe is running Gutsy, Xubuntu version though. Even Xubuntu is slow on that one, if I was to upgrade to Maverick or Natty on that it might not work at all. Looking at Lubuntu - too bad Fluxbuntu looks abandoned.

I'd love to put Ubuntu on the work laptop but I don't own it.;)

genghiskhanid
April 7th, 2011, 07:51 PM
I've started using Ubuntu on my main rig last month but I didn't have time to get to know it much. I was looking forward into installing it on my netbook but had difficulty installing 10.10 from a pendrive so i'm postponing until 11.04.

I'd prefer switching everything over to Ubuntu but i'm way too green for that. Anyone know of a great place to get information on how to use Ubuntu for real beginers? PM me

Zorgoth
April 7th, 2011, 07:56 PM
I have used nothing but Linux for a year, but if I get a desktop I'll put Windows on it as well as Ubuntu - I might get a Macbook in which case I'd probably keep OS X as well as Ubuntu. Ubuntu is perfectly usable as a sole operating system, but my pitiful little ATI card is pretty ineffectual trying to run Windows games through wine when on Windows it would do fine. I don't have Windows because it just refused to play nice with my Ubuntu and my Ubuntu is more important to me; however due to security I'm never putting Windows on my laptop again.

Zorgoth
April 7th, 2011, 08:02 PM
I've started using Ubuntu on my main rig last month but I didn't have time to get to know it much. I was looking forward into installing it on my netbook but had difficulty installing 10.10 from a pendrive so i'm postponing until 11.04.

I'd prefer switching everything over to Ubuntu but i'm way too green for that. Anyone know of a great place to get information on how to use Ubuntu for real beginers? PM me

First: I wouldn't recommend getting 11.04 when it's released. The beta is VERY buggy at the moment and I don't think everything will be worked out yet by release. I'd wait a couple months for the kinks to get ironed out of Unity.

Second: Just messing about with Ubuntu is the best way to get to know it. The forums and the community documentation are really good places to get to learn Ubuntu. I think the best way to learn Ubuntu is just to solve things as they come.

It's not necessary but I'd recommend learning scripting in bash because sometimes it can make your life easier.

IHeequ5i
April 7th, 2011, 09:24 PM
My first introduction to Unix was back in the 70's and early 80's on a VAX 750 and later a PDP/11. Fast-forward to the 90's, and my boss tossed me into administering a Red Hat Linux server - which I later found out was running a pirated version of RH... fun, fun. So there I was in a completely unsupported environment, trying to set up this one box to be a combination web server, mail server, and ftp server. Red Hat taught me about rpm dependencies and how easy it was to get snarled up and have to reinstall.

I tried Debian, Mint, and Fedora before finally settling on Ubuntu. At this point, I'm still dual booting Windows 7 and Ubuntu. Once I finish porting my websites into bluefish / seamonkey, I'll be in a better position to tell Microsoft to go jump.

peyre
April 8th, 2011, 06:00 AM
Even Xubuntu is slow on that one, if I was to upgrade to Maverick or Natty on that it might not work at all. Looking at Lubuntu - too bad Fluxbuntu looks abandoned.

I'm running Lubuntu on my ten-year-old laptop, and it's helping me keep that old thing running. It works well, if a bit slow (as if anything else would be faster). It ran Windows 2000 pretty well too, but took several times longer to boot--sheesh! Lubuntu comes up in something like a minute and a half.

Fraoch
April 8th, 2011, 01:30 PM
I'm running Lubuntu on my ten-year-old laptop, and it's helping me keep that old thing running. It works well, if a bit slow (as if anything else would be faster). It ran Windows 2000 pretty well too, but took several times longer to boot--sheesh! Lubuntu comes up in something like a minute and a half.

Xubuntu does run on it, but there are grinding halts as various processes start up and run. It looks like the requirements for more recent versions of Xubuntu are even higher. This machine has only 192 MB of RAM, that's not enough for recent Xubuntu versions, and seeing as it does not perform well with older versions I suspect the minimum system requirements are pretty accurate.:)

As far as I can tell, in terms of increasing demands on system resources:

- Fluxbuntu

- Lubuntu

- Xubuntu

- Ubuntu

I do see this:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/LowMemorySystems

I might try kind of a roll-my-own approach as seen on that page.

This is why Linux is fun!

peyre
April 9th, 2011, 04:14 AM
Xubuntu does run on it, but there are grinding halts as various processes start up and run. It looks like the requirements for more recent versions of Xubuntu are even higher. This machine has only 192 MB of RAM, that's not enough for recent Xubuntu versions, and seeing as it does not perform well with older versions I suspect the minimum system requirements are pretty accurate.:)

Well, if (like me) you want to go with a premade distro, I'd still suggest Lubuntu--it's supported all the way down to 128MB RAM, though if you have under 160MB you'll have to install using the Alternate CD.

Lubuntu System Requirements (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lubuntu#System%20requirements)

I don't like Lubuntu as much as Xubuntu, personally, but Lubuntu is great for older machines--especially secondary/travel computers where the exact details of the look and feel are less important.

hunterkasy
April 9th, 2011, 05:56 AM
I want to erase Windows but unfortunately, I'm still a gamer at heart.

When 10.04 came out I completely switched all of my computers to ubuntu. I have found enough Linux games to keep me happy

Fraoch
April 9th, 2011, 06:08 AM
Well, if (like me) you want to go with a premade distro, I'd still suggest Lubuntu--it's supported all the way down to 128MB RAM, though if you have under 160MB you'll have to install using the Alternate CD.

Lubuntu System Requirements (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lubuntu#System%20requirements)

I don't like Lubuntu as much as Xubuntu, personally, but Lubuntu is great for older machines--especially secondary/travel computers where the exact details of the look and feel are less important.

I'm installing Lubuntu in a VM right now actually.

I tried to "roll my own" lightweight Ubuntu using this:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/LowMemorySystems

but got caught up in the minutiae. Bit off a bit more than I could chew! I'll try a pre-made variant first.

deciding39
April 9th, 2011, 06:17 PM
I've tried, I really have...

For a solid 2 years I was all Ubuntu. Then two things happened that resulted in setting up a windows partition :(

-Gaming. I can't give it up, and there are far too many games I can't get to run under Ubuntu. I have ScummVM and a slew of console emulators, dosbox, but there are still some classics that just won't work. There are some great indie games out there too, especially on Steam, but I wasn't getting very good results with Steam on Wine.

-Wireless. Ever since the Lucid update I've had problems with my wireless dropping out under high loads. It's pretty sporadic, but usually happens when downloading large torrents, streaming movies to my tv using ushare, or browsing photos or maps online. Whatever browser I'm running doesn't fully close. Any attempts to kill the associated tasks or reset networking freezes up the comp. A reboot or shutdown hangs. It's been frustrating for some time now, and it's the one issue these forums haven't been able to help me solve. ](*,) Current solution? XBMC on windows partition. It's been working like a charm...but hurts my soul, just a little bit.

I'm still on Ubuntu 80%+ of the time. Especially when it comes to e-mails, online banking and the like...I just can't trust windows security. I managed to get the Windows Recovery Virus within hours of setting up the partition!

KL_72_TR
April 9th, 2011, 07:22 PM
-Gaming. I can't give it up,
Don't be so fanatic. Games are beautiful when played once in a while. I am a gamer to but I try to find ways to make my games work on Ubuntu or try to relax a bit with games available for Linux.
Now I go to Windows xp only for MS-DOS. It is not so powerful and large as Command-line is in Linux but is better than destroying my brain with GUI
Happy Linux :-)

leonbravo
April 9th, 2011, 08:45 PM
I completely switched to Ubuntu since 3 years ago. I keep virtual box installed and ocassionally use it to test errors and some Windown aplications (Sql Server, Visual studio for datawarehouse)

Greydog56
April 9th, 2011, 09:11 PM
I'm 95% Linux now. Other 5% has to be windows for running adobe video editing suites. One additional thought if I can. While I don't care for many things about Windows or even Adobe, they do certain jobs well for me. I favour Linux but use other tools where necessary to get a job done.

barthus
April 9th, 2011, 09:24 PM
I'm still on Ubuntu 80%+ of the time. Especially when it comes to e-mails, online banking and the like...I just can't trust windows security. I managed to get the Windows Recovery Virus within hours of setting up the partition!

So, I think this is still a good result - 80%! For serious things you use Linux instead of Windows. Playing games ... well it doesn't really matter so much.

peyre
April 9th, 2011, 10:02 PM
-Gaming. I can't give it up, and there are far too many games I can't get to run under Ubuntu. I have ScummVM and a slew of console emulators, dosbox, but there are still some classics that just won't work. There are some great indie games out there too, especially on Steam, but I wasn't getting very good results with Steam on Wine.

-Wireless. Ever since the Lucid update I've had problems with my wireless dropping out under high loads. It's pretty sporadic, but usually happens when downloading large torrents, streaming movies to my tv using ushare, or browsing photos or maps online. Whatever browser I'm running doesn't fully close. Any attempts to kill the associated tasks or reset networking freezes up the comp. A reboot or shutdown hangs. It's been frustrating for some time now, and it's the one issue these forums haven't been able to help me solve. ](*,) Current solution? XBMC on windows partition. It's been working like a charm...but hurts my soul, just a little bit.

I haven't had those problems with wireless. The WiFi on my Lubuntu machine works pretty well. It cuts out sometimes, it does that in Windows too, so that's kind of a wash. But, my laptop is older than the hills and has just a Wireless B card--so I'm not doing heavy-duty downloading either, just light Web surfing.

Games are definitely a problem for Linux--not a fault of Linux, any more than it's Windows's fault that it can't run Linux software (of course, Linux gets credit for going out of its way to make it possible to run Windows software). But it is an issue that Linux users have to live with. So far, the only things I just can't get to run in Wine (that I wanted to) are:

Alpha Centauri (but even better--with the Loki port and a lot of tweaking, I can run it natively in Linux)
About half of my kids' educational games (so their computer runs XP)
Tax software--specifically, TaxAct (so that runs in a VM, and it's just once a year anyway)
chkdsk (for our external hard drive that backs up both my computer and the wife's, so ext isn't an option)

DeElent
April 11th, 2011, 03:20 AM
I have been 100% ubuntu for 5 months now. Loving the decision.

Except for some reason TF2 wont lauch. only major problem I have had. I get the "team fortress 2 is preparing to launch..." screen then it goes away and nothing. steam doesnt crash or anything, it just doesnt launch. Very irritating. :confused:

FLORIBUNTU
April 15th, 2011, 11:56 AM
COMPLETELY FOR 2 YRS NOW...not a gamer though, even with what s available under buntu.

kepps Virtualbox to run XP for testing some Client soft.

Plus sistematicaly instal Ubuntu as dual boot when formating XP clients PC. ...spreading the Good news !
Many Client Pc have Windows pirated software. I ask them why ? when UBuntu can offer it 100% legally ?
Several of them have switched 100% too... ):P

scott-ian
April 16th, 2011, 02:58 AM
I switched to Linux, and have no regrets. Many windows programs can be run in Vmware Player. You need a windows licence or course. I would use Virtualbox, but Vmware has a much better unity mode, which is rarely mentioned when the two are compared.

binoy4linux
April 16th, 2011, 03:15 AM
I have Win7 on a Sony Vaio for the wife. I have Win7 and Ubuntu 10.10 dual boot on another Vaio. I just picked up a Netbook with Win7 Starter on it and didn't like it for the limitations so I have the Netbook running Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop exclusively. Desktop works great on the Netbook and don't care for Unity in Ubuntu for Netbooks Edition, you need to upgrade the Netbook to 2GB RAM, though. The wife is liking the Netbook for the battery life and she is gettin used to Ubuntu, as well. May have to go exclusively Ubuntu soon!

Canime
April 16th, 2011, 06:46 AM
I have used Linux for several years on and off. Of course I have had issues when changing hardware, as the natural choice is to select Windows, and even getting Windows bundled with the station is good too. I went off-linux for a while due to having upgrade related windows issues from work. Finally I have reverted back to the latest distro. Also, did anyone notice that getting linux earlier on was a chore and a half. I tried loading Linux from the internet back in 2000, with no success, again in 2002, with no success, but finally from a magazine cover in 2005 sometime. Its been working well now with some good stories of how I have adapted to the newer versions and so on. Nothing on games though, I hardly run any games on Linux...

Fraoch
April 16th, 2011, 05:07 PM
Also, did anyone notice that getting linux earlier on was a chore and a half. I tried loading Linux from the internet back in 2000, with no success, again in 2002, with no success, but finally from a magazine cover in 2005 sometime.

Yes I was unable to get any linux distro to work prior to Ubuntu. I tried most of them - Red Hat (before Fedora), Mandrake (before it was Mandriva), SUSE (before openSUSE), KNOPPIX and probably a few others I forgot. None of them worked, with major, show-stopping hardware incompatibility issues. So I never went much beyond playing around with them and I always went back to Windows.

I think this is why I don't like KDE now. Most of these distros used KDE, Ubuntu was the first one I tried with GNOME. I must subconsciously associate KDE with disappointment, failure and poor operation and GNOME with success. Apologies to Kubuntu users and KDE fans - now that I know more about Linux I know that those initial difficulties had nothing to do with the desktop environment.:)

BlacqWolf
April 16th, 2011, 05:23 PM
I used to game on Windows, but after playing Perfect Dark on Mupen (and trying other games made for Linux), I'm a full Linux now.

PaulW2U
April 16th, 2011, 05:38 PM
Also, did anyone notice that getting linux earlier on was a chore and a half. I tried loading Linux from the internet back in 2000, with no success, again in 2002, with no success, but finally from a magazine cover in 2005 sometime. Its been working well now with some good stories of how I have adapted to the newer versions and so on. Nothing on games though, I hardly run any games on Linux...
My early attempts at installing Linux in around 1999 or 2000 were from purchases made from local book stores that were selling boxed sets of Mandrake and possibly Red Hat. If I managed to get the sound working then I would have a poor display resolution. If the display resolution was good then I would have no sound. The look and feel of both Gnome and KDE was so awful I went back to Windows for nearly ten years believing that Linux wasn't for me. But when my father, then in his 70s, started talking about Ubuntu and how good it was I had to give it a try.

Initially I had a wubi install of Lucid, then a full installation with Maverick on another drive. Both were the Gnome versions as at that point I was not interested in running KDE. Due to the very buggy nature of applications such as gwibber, rhythm box and banshee I quickly came to the conclusion that these applications would always make my Linux experience be less than perfect. Printing to my Dell printer was also impossible. Lucid and Maverick still have outstanding bugs that prevent me from using either distribution 100%. Other distributions also have problems of their own. For those reasons I will never switch completely to Linux.

I have since switched my main Linux installation to Kubuntu as KDE's applications are far less prone to crashing and are far more reliable than its Gnome counterparts but I will always have Windows 7 and Office 2010 available on my laptop although I am using it less and less.

swinghein
April 17th, 2011, 02:32 AM
I completely converted both of my PCs last month with no previous Linux/Unix expirience. I needed a hobby and I am having a blast.

peyre
April 17th, 2011, 04:33 AM
(snip) The look and feel of both Gnome and KDE was so awful I went back to Windows for nearly ten years believing that Linux wasn't for me. But when my father, then in his 70s, started talking about Ubuntu and how good it was I had to give it a try.

(snip) Lucid and Maverick still have outstanding bugs that prevent me from using either distribution 100%. Other distributions also have problems of their own. For those reasons I will never switch completely to Linux.

Funny you should say that. Most serious Linux enthusiasts will laugh or roll their eyes at this, but one reason I'm happy with my distro is because I'm able to get it to look and act a lot like Windows (specifically, Windows 2000). That's the main reason I use Xubuntu instead of Ubuntu, frankly (though Xubuntu's snappy response time is also a big draw--I'm not into eye candy and transition effects).

I was able to test-drive *buntu on an old spare machine at work, and came to find I could do over 90% of what I do in Windows with drop-in replacements in Linux (e.g., Audacious to replace Winamp). Then when I put in an old favorite Windows game, double-clicked on setup.exe, and it opened in Wine, installed as per normal, and ran the game in Wine--just like that--I knew I could make the switch. Two years later, I'm very glad I did.

I always felt--trapped--in Windows. There was always the feeling that Microsoft could simply change something about its terms (forcing a switch to a subscription basis, for instance) and there was very little I could do about it. Also, those Windows licenses that come with OEM computers aren't transferrable to other computers, and you're stuck with that OS on that computer unless you're willing to shell out for a later version. But I can always run the latest and greatest on my Linux machines, and all for free. Go Canonical!

(And if something were to happen to Canonical, or it was taken over by a proverbial Darth Vader la SCO, there's a whole world of Linux distros out there...and the switch between distros is way smaller than between Linux and Windows.

Canime
April 17th, 2011, 06:35 AM
Yes I was unable to get any linux distro to work prior to Ubuntu. I tried most of them - Red Hat (before Fedora), Mandrake (before it was Mandriva), SUSE (before openSUSE), KNOPPIX and probably a few others I forgot. None of them worked, with major, show-stopping hardware incompatibility issues. So I never went much beyond playing around with them and I always went back to Windows.

I think this is why I don't like KDE now. Most of these distros used KDE, Ubuntu was the first one I tried with GNOME. I must subconsciously associate KDE with disappointment, failure and poor operation and GNOME with success. Apologies to Kubuntu users and KDE fans - now that I know more about Linux I know that those initial difficulties had nothing to do with the desktop environment.:)

Well yes, the first times for me were also in the KDE desktop environment, and I found that they resembled a clunky version of XP, so I gave that away too in favor of Gnome. Phew, glad someone out there heard that.

aaron76
April 17th, 2011, 02:39 PM
I completely switched to Ubuntu recently. I like to make music on my laptop, so unfortunately I can't use Reason anymore (unless there's some way I don't know about).
On the plus side Renoise works fine :).
Barely played a PC game in my life, so that's a non-issue.
So, basically no regrets.

alaukikyo
April 17th, 2011, 02:50 PM
I completely switched to Ubuntu recently. I like to make music on my laptop, so unfortunately I can't use Reason anymore (unless there's some way I don't know about).
On the plus side Renoise works fine :).
Barely played a PC game in my life, so that's a non-issue.
So, basically no regrets.

you should try Linux MultiMedia Studio and other alternatives(http://alternativeto.net/software/reason/?platform=linux&license=opensource)

Jacobonbuntu
April 17th, 2011, 08:36 PM
To my own surprise; I left windows 7 completely 2 months ago on my "best" computer, for Ubuntu. So far without regrets. I had to rebuild a number of databases (used to use Filemaker). I think Linux productivity software made an incredible development the past few years. Also graphical software like Scribus. I just produced the first prepress documents to be published, completely without Windows software :). All hardware is working fine, even some stuff I never got working under Windows. (my older firewire videocamera with 16 bit sound). So far so good, I love the system and he way I can make it look and feel.

Jacob

FMAnimus
April 19th, 2011, 06:48 PM
I installed Ubuntu four days ago with the intention to dual-boot between Ubuntu and Vista. Due to a user error on my part while manually partitioning, I lost Vista entirely. I had about 5 minutes of fear, but once I got to start really using Ubuntu, I was hooked. I'm relatively new to Linux, and using it has just made me enjoy the challenge of learning how to use it. I feel like I'm actually in control of my system now, and that there is so much more potential to really utilize the full ability of an OS. I've known Windows extremely well my entire life, but the last few years have been getting so redundant with the constant updates, security risks, and racketeering. After watching my system resources just get consumed further and further, I just stopped logging into my computers at all. It really took the fun out of using a PC for me. Since (accidentally) clearing Vista and solely using Ubuntu, I'm really having fun with it again. Not to mention the community here is one of the most helpful I've seen anywhere. I can't wait to keep learning Linux, and I can honestly say that so far it feels good to leave Windows behind, even as a person that used to be a HUGE PC gamer.

ClientAlive
April 20th, 2011, 06:00 AM
I completely switched over to Ubuntu about a month ago. I have a particular laptop that has a couple pieces of hardware that have issues with Linux so the only distro I could even install without problems was 11.04 (alpha 3 at the time). Then wireless internet gave me all-kinds of grief! Graphics is a whole other story and I haven't even tackled that yet.

When I was a Windows user I had deceived myself into believing I was actually pretty knowledgeable with computers. Yeah right! I knew how to click things - that's it. I love the idea of becoming more skilled with computers and Linux seems like just the thing to get me there. I Love Linux, what I see it can do, and I look forward to enjoying all those things. I'll tell you what though - Linux is making my head hurt.

All this code this and code that. And it's so complicated! I feel like I'm totally out of my element. I try to do the simplest things. I have problems come up with the simplest things (like an app not working or something) and the answers seem so complicated and extreme! It's like I always have to put hours and hours and hours of studying in just to understand how to do or to solve some simple little thing.

I'm not going anywhere; but, I'll be honest, this process is kickin' my but! I feel like I'm going through some kind of rebirth or something. I'm dying Windows, to the only thing I've ever known. Will I be resurrected to find myself a new creation in Linux land? i don't know, but I hope so. This is excruciating!

Thanks for listening.
:neutral:

bleutyler
April 20th, 2011, 06:02 AM
It has been since Ubuntu 8.04 for me. I really liked that Gnome and Ubuntu make it SO easy to transition from Windows to Linux. The open source products are fantastic too. So far, the Ubuntu computer in the house has never been in need of repairs, and all my family members are comfortable with it too.

These forums are great!

pony-tail
April 20th, 2011, 08:14 AM
I have been using Linux as my primary OS for a bit over 9 years .
Mostly Debian based but SuSe and Redhat in the early days although my all time Favourite was Caldera open Linux . That was a long time ago though .
I have been fiddling with linux since I first got a disk included with a magazine a very long time ago .

neuralfrenzy
April 26th, 2011, 10:41 PM
Has anyone left Windows being entirely for Ubuntu? If so, have you run into any difficulties?

wilee-nilee
April 26th, 2011, 10:52 PM
Has anyone left Windows being entirely for Ubuntu? If so, have you run into any difficulties?

Have you considered that some didn't even start on Windows?

Personally I have no intrinsic need for MS, but having got W7 pro for a cheap college student price I use it to help those that need help. In other words I use it enough to have a basic understand of the setups.

I am almost middle aged so my interest in computers only came with a return to college and the need for a basic setup Dapper was its name.

nkbielst
April 26th, 2011, 10:53 PM
Almost. I still have 1 program I need to use for work. This program runs fine under wine, but only in demo mode because it is protected by a sentinel usb security dongle. So, XP in Virtualbox on the occasions when I need to use that program.

I hope we can get this to work in wine, someday.

Nick

Desert Sailor
April 26th, 2011, 10:57 PM
I left windows in the rear view mirror about 2 years ago. There are some things that require some getting used to, and some special software that takes more effort, but if you're mostly browsing the web, sending and receiving e-mail, and storing photos and music, then you'll never miss the virus from Redmond.

K_45
April 26th, 2011, 10:58 PM
I've dropped it on all my PC's, except my gaming one, and when it comes time to upgrade that gaming PC I may just buy a console and chip its firmware, and sell that old gaming PC. Windows isn't necessary on a PC/laptop/netbook/tablet anymore unless you play games 24/7 or can't find an alternative to some applications, which is unlikely.

hodge3153
April 26th, 2011, 11:01 PM
Has anyone left Windows being entirely for Ubuntu? If so, have you run into any difficulties?

With the exception of Visual Studios I have left Windows completely. I have existing code that I must support for some of my clients which uses MFC, so I use Windows, virtuallized in VirtualBox just for the Visual Studios code support. All other uses are strictly Linux. If the existing code was not so large, then I would rewrite it to use WxWidgets or some similar cross platform api and never use Windows again. I believe that if a person is willing to commit to 1 month of using Linux exclusive, they will be sold on Linux, you can not beat the support and stability.

DogMatix
April 26th, 2011, 11:14 PM
No. Unfortunately not.

I use linux distros. exclusively in my spare time for personal computing. But for my work, due to market pressures and compatibility issues, I have an OS X Mac and a Windows box because clients still want Windows compatible programs, etc. and as there is a majority of Windows & Internet Explorer users I have to make sure everything works and looks right for them.

kiddfroster
April 26th, 2011, 11:20 PM
I have on my netbook, which has no purpose other than an emergency web browsing computer for when my main laptop is down. I run Windows on my main laptop only because HP locked down the BIOS and ACPI so there isn't full hardware support, and likely never will be for this model.

cmcanulty
April 26th, 2011, 11:27 PM
Yes 2 yrs ago. Now I have to use a few win 7 machines at our library (I changes all the public machines to Ubuntu 2 yrs ago). Whenever I use the WIN 7 machines I am iritated by the time lags, irritating messages etc, Linux is the way to go. The thing with Windows is everybody knows it but after a few minutes on Ubuntu they figure it out.Our library software went to open source in March, hurrah!

ajgreeny
April 26th, 2011, 11:40 PM
I began using ubuntu at version 5.04, and although I still had WinXP until about 18 months ago, I did not actually use it; I used to boot to it about once a month to update the system and the virus checker, which was a long, long business. Eventually, I realised that it was totally pointless for me to keep XP just to do that so I dumped it.

In had been using Firefox, Thunderbird, OpenOffice and Gimp on windows for a few years, even before starting to use Ubuntu, so the idea of open source was not alien to me, and having got on so well with those packages, moving to an open source operating system beneath the packages made complete sense to me.

I am now totally windows free, as is my wife, and neither of us miss anything about windows in any way.

Telengard C64
April 26th, 2011, 11:49 PM
I have been a full-time Kubuntu user for about two years now. I still have my old Windows partition, but the only occasions I've found to boot it is for updating. I also keep a sealed copy of Windows which I can legally use in a virtual machine if the need ever arises (so far not).

I find I can do everything I need to in Kubuntu, sometimes with the help of Wine. There are really less than five programs I use Wine for, mostly because the developers are short on resources or just plain stubborn. They are unique, special purpose programs for which a Linux version or equivalent will never likely arrive.

I spent much of my Windows years finding cross-platform open source solutions for all my computing needs. Programs like Firefox, Open Office, and XChat work pretty much the same on any platform.

One sticky problem was Roboform, my Windows password manager. There is not, and may never be, a Linux password manager which offers all the features and integration of Roboform. I now use KeePassX, which does everything Roboform did except integration with Firefox. If not for KeePassX then I might have eventually found LastPass (http://lastpass.com/), which does have a Linux-native client.

There are occasions when something which was easy in Windows seems hard in Kubuntu. The solutions to these problems are usually very interesting, and I learn a great deal by solving them.

When it comes to games I just don't care anymore. The games I enjoy most are those 8-bit and 16-bit eras, and I have to run those in emulators anyway. I can still play many modern games in my web browser, or on my console systems. Installing games on Windows was rarely a perfect experience anyway, and sometimes brought adware, spyware, or other problems.

The biggest change in my computing life since switching to Kubuntu is that I'm having more fun than I ever did with Windows. Yeah, I'm one of those weird people who thinks learning about computers is fun.

colin.p
April 26th, 2011, 11:53 PM
I have a dual-boot Dell 1545 laptop (lucid/7) that I bought last June. I think I booted into 7 around three or 4 months ago, can't even remember why.
The only reason that I kept 7 is to copy/backup DVDs, as I haven't found a reliably updated linux equivalent and I paid for the program that runs in win. I hope that the guys that make the program will eventually port over to linux, even though I have heard they are toying with making an OSX version.
So until then, I keep windows. However, I have installed XP into VB and I find it runs very fast, alot faster than Open SUSE and Debian do in VB.
I then installed my DVD copy program into XP and will try to do a copy. If it works, then I will nuke 7 and claim the 100GB space.
That was the sole reason I had windows at all, even though I haven't actually copied a DVD for several months.

As of 8am April 27 2011, I have now removed 7 (left the recovery partition, however, if for some strange reason, I ever get rid of this computer and the next person wants windows). I now have an additional 167GB free. Whatever am I to do with all that free space? ;)

dFlyer
April 27th, 2011, 12:00 AM
Has anyone left Windows being entirely for Ubuntu? If so, have you run into any difficulties?

As I always say, an OS is a personal choice. Back in the Mid 90's I would dual boot windows 95 and linux mainly because I need access to the internet and was unable to access the net with the winmodem I had. Sometime before windows 98 came out I got a modem that did not require windows and was able to access the internet via linux. I still dual booted up until XP. Shortly after XP came out I was using DSL and switch to linux 100%. I've been using Ubuntu since 6.06, on my Toshiba and now on my Dell. I've been happy with Ubuntu and have stayed with it. Other distro I've used prior to Ubuntu have been SuSE, RedHat, Mandrake, Caldera, Debian, Slackware and a few others. I've stayed with Ubuntu because it Debian based and free, with great support. The only windows in my house are the ones with glass in them. My wife has Ubuntu on her Gateway.

_outlawed_
April 27th, 2011, 12:03 AM
Has anyone left Windows being entirely for Ubuntu? If so, have you run into any difficulties?

Related; http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=6894

Jinren
April 27th, 2011, 12:03 AM
I'm in the process of trying to leave Windows right now. I tell you though, it's scary stuff (speaking mainly as a gamer and Visual Studio user).

I'm one of the very, very small minority of people who have had 1) Less than a perfect introduction to Linux (must be something odd about my main PC as my netbook and little laptop had no problems), and 2) Actually a really lovely time using Windows. I want to switch because of XP's age, and some new-found FOSS zealotry, but in terms of performance, crashes, viruses etc. my Windows install has always been perfect.

Luck, eh.

gnicko
April 27th, 2011, 12:24 AM
I left Windows behind 3-4 years ago and haven't really looked back.

I'm not much of a gamer and the only real "work" that I do around the house is web development or database kind of stuff. Sometimes I have to "remote in" to work to finish something up, but I have no real need for Microsoft anymore--I can do any and everything with my Linux boxes quite easily.

I have servers (Debian) and desktop running Debian 6 with XFCE, and I run the Mint Debian XFCE release (whatever its "officially" called) on my laptop--having recently switched the desktop from Xubuntu and the laptop from Fedora. I have VirtualBox installations of XP and Windows 7 just so I don't go "stale" when I'm talking to other people...but I never actually "do" anything with them.

My wife still runs Vista on her laptop--she likes the Solitaire game that comes with Vista, but that's her business....I still have to use XP at work (not my choice, nor incidentally, the IT guys there either...we're kind of stuck with it for the time being.)

One thing I do notice is just how difficult it is to actually *use* Windows to do anything constructive with now that I'm comfortable with Linux....that's a full 180 for me in the last few years!

The other day I came to the "realization" that I couldn't make a symbolic link on my XP machine at work, with a jolt like getting hit in the face with a brick. I thought, "What a stupid, stupid way to have an operating system!"

I remember not too long ago when I had Linux installed in virtual machines and would poke around wondering how anybody ever actually got anything done without Windows. Windows seems so confining anymore!

yetiman64
April 27th, 2011, 12:53 AM
Has anyone left Windows being entirely for Ubuntu? If so, have you run into any difficulties?

Yes, I'm now exclusively on Ubuntu.

I started Ubuntu in 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) and initially dual booted XP and Ubuntu then later on Vista and Ubuntu. My biggest difficulty was undoing the ~16 years of learning (mindset) I'd developed in Windows - it does very little for you in Ubuntu really (only some of the computing basics not OS dependent are of use, like partitioning and hardware related information etc.)

I'm lucky in that I'm not so much into Windows only gaming, and although WINE can be used at times, gaming is a good reason to maintain a dual boot set up. Any other Windows only applications can be run under Windows installed in a Virtual Machine. Virtualbox is good for this IF your hardware supports virtualization and has enough resources.

However most programs in Windows have at least a reasonable alternative to use in Ubuntu nowadays. They usually require relearning how to do the tasks required though, as they rarely if ever are a "clone" of the Windows program. I think needing to relearn a task already learnt under Windows causes grief to a lot of people who do the switch to Ubuntu.

I've been on Ubuntu exclusively for about 18 months now and am enjoying my computing immensely, with far more safety and a lot less maintenance, I no longer worry about viruses/malware by following some good advice --HERE-- (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=510812).

Good luck, enjoy your Ubuntu-ing, and welcome to the forums,
yetiman64

abnordude
April 27th, 2011, 01:11 AM
Well, I left windows completely and now am into linux.
I have to say that I like it very very much.
I mainly do programming and photo editing stuff so I have good alternatives for doing that in linux.
But the one that I miss is the Windows Movie Maker.
Well there are other alternatives for that too, but I found those to be a little different [maybe becoz I Have used windows movie maker a lot.]
But yet softwares like avidemux are great alternatives.
Well. There is a website that gives the alternative software for linux.
try this
http://www.linuxalt.com/

leclerc65
April 27th, 2011, 01:30 AM
The other day I tried to book an ticket using my Frequent Flyer points. It's really an exercise of frustration.
Back and forth phone calls to their support center with conversation samples like the following.

Me: I tried to book ... but it didn't work.
Sup: What happened ?
Me: After hitting button "Book Now" - my screen just froze.
Sup: What browser do you use ?
Me: Chrome.
Sup: I sorry we don't support Chrome (he must be bullsh...)

15 min of frustration

Me : You blamed Chrome, now I use Firefox, still it did not work.
Sup: What OS did you use ?
Me: Ubuntu , um... Linux (I was afraid he wouldn't know what Ubuntu was).
Sup: Sorry we don't support Linux.

another 15 minutes of frustration

Me: Now I use Windows XP...
Sup: What browser did you use ?
Me: IE 7
Sup: It should work, but I don't know the reason why it didn't. I will have an agent booking it for you. There is no charge for you, because it's our fault (there is a service fee if you use human aid).

I won't be surprised if one day they will come up with an answer like: "Sorry we don't support Windows XP...".

dniMretsaM
April 27th, 2011, 01:42 AM
I came to Ubuntu a few months ago and I don't plan to go back (except maybe for program development, since I plan to be a programmer when I 'grow up'). The only regret I have is a few programs don't work, but most have a well-working alternative for Linux. The ones that don't I'm just going to deal with. I don't mind.

K_45
April 27th, 2011, 01:50 AM
The other day I tried to book an ticket using my Frequent Flyer points. It's really an exercise of frustration.
Back and forth phone calls to their support center with conversation samples like the following.

Me: I tried to book ... but it didn't work.
Sup: What happened ?
Me: After hitting button "Book Now" - my screen just froze.
Sup: What browser do you use ?
Me: Chrome.
Sup: I sorry we don't support Chrome (he must be bullsh...)

15 min of frustration

Me : You blamed Chrome, now I use Firefox, still it did not work.
Sup: What OS did you use ?
Me: Ubuntu , um... Linux (I was afraid he wouldn't know what Ubuntu was).
Sup: Sorry we don't support Linux.

another 15 minutes of frustration

Me: Now I use Windows XP...
Sup: What browser did you use ?
Me: IE 7
Sup: It should work, but I don't know the reason why it didn't. I will have an agent booking it for you. There is no charge for you, because it's our fault (there is a service fee if you use human aid).

I won't be surprised if one day they will come up with an answer like: "Sorry we don't support Windows XP...".

So how didn't this work? Isn't it all online?

leclerc65
April 27th, 2011, 01:54 AM
I had to tell the booking agent what I wanted. The booking agent used his own program , as for my problem, there was no explanation.

3177
April 27th, 2011, 01:56 AM
I have, and I have managed to install quake 1-ETQW natively.
The only problem I had was learning to install natively(believe me it took some time).

Timmer1240
April 27th, 2011, 02:05 AM
Linux Mint Debian full time now the only time I mess around with Windows machines is to fix and clean em up thinking about setting up a duel boot as I have some games Id like to play again other than that I have no use for it.

Cathhsmom
April 27th, 2011, 02:11 AM
Having fixed my computer and friend's computers for software and OS problems in the Windows OS environment, and I can tell you that I do not miss fixing Windows. I love Ubuntu and I do not have Windows installed on my computer. I have learned to use alternative programs to the programs that I loved in Windows. And if Ubuntu or Linux do not do what I need, I learn to do without. The peace of a dependable OS system is worth that much to me. Ubuntu is peace. We could discuss the other things that I love about Ubuntu, but I would be spending all day. The reason mentioned is my main reason.

cgroza
April 27th, 2011, 02:16 AM
I quit windows 2 years ago and never missed it. Of course that depends if you are a heavy gamer or not, because everyone knows the best platform for PC games is Windows.

karrank%
April 27th, 2011, 04:52 AM
Not entirely, built my own box last year and put Lucid on to see if my wife would notice....NOT :) but I keep our old Emachines windoze box in the closet 'coz I can't figure a way to reprogram/tweak our Harmony remote otherwise--a rare occurrence.

otherwise, no looking back--and if anyone knows a simple Logitech workaround I'm all ears!

Baldrick_NZ
April 27th, 2011, 05:58 AM
I've been happily Windows-free since October 2009 when a reformat of XP completely screwed up what was on my external hard drive. I'd been playing with Ubuntu up to that point.

Once an LPFM operator, I used a Windows based application to run the station. Unfortunately it didn't run under wine and the author of it wasn't interested in porting it to Linux (or Mac even). The love of radio broadcasting still runs through my veins, and this is why I still have a separate XP hard drive. I've tried other play-out software for Linux, but it seems to be largely clunky with ugly ui's and is a steep learning curve from what I'm used to.

When XP reaches EOL, then Windows will disappear completely from my PC (along with my gradually fading love of radio broadcasting).

I love Ubuntu for it's ease of use, the many free apps available, that it's fully customisable and you can do pretty much anything with it.

One thing that I believe Ubuntu is not, is an OS for close-minded Windows users, who moan at every turn because it's not what they're used to and don't want to have their minds opened to the endless possibilities outside Windows. Any chance I get, I try to point frustrated Windows users toward Ubuntu. Believe me, there are a heap of them! lol

For me, I'll stick with Ubuntu 10.04 as my primary OS until EOL, which is still 2 and a half years away. By then 12.04 will be out and stable.

ClientAlive
April 27th, 2011, 07:18 AM
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=6894&page=772

Post #7715 is my story.

I jumped in w/ both feet. Though there are times I feel like ripping my hair out of my head I wouldn't take it back for anything. I love Linux! There's a learning curve - 'specially if you you choose to start learning bash code - but it-is-sooooo-worth it.

Just last night I learned how to create a whole directory structure (with several levels, named what I wanted, etc) in just a couple minutes and one line of code. This thing rocks baby!!!

:)

ClientAlive
April 27th, 2011, 07:24 AM
I had to tell the booking agent what I wanted. The booking agent used his own program , as for my problem, there was no explanation.


Coincidentally - Web pages have been freezing on me lately. I use Chrome. Hmmm . . .

Elfy
April 27th, 2011, 07:34 AM
merge to existing thread

Oliphant
April 29th, 2011, 04:50 AM
I have commented on this thread before.. Maybe close to or over a year ago. I had a problem with Microsoft and I swore I would just jump right into Linux but I couldn't only because I had software that is dependent on Windows and being a Linux greenhorn I just couldn't do it fully.

I've been taking programming courses and I've taken a strong liking to C# and love Microsoft's visual Studio BUT, I've also taken a stronger liking to Open Source. That may come from the poor economy and I just can't bring myself to spend money on software that is readily available in the open source world. So I've been looking into mostly cross-platform programming.

I do have a small handful of programs that will only function on windows and I've had no luck with Wine/Crossover BUT, I have started researching hardcore on what alternatives I can use. I'm amazed at how much is available for free that are just as powerful as the paid versions.

I had sat and thought about my computing needs and everything I do, Linux can provide and can do much more with being flexible. Your average user, can survive purely on Linux BUT, the unfamiliar territory and the fact that walking into Best Buy and picking up a $500 laptop with Windows is nice and easy. I've successfully converted a co-worker of mine and its great talking to him about it. He LOVES it, his son now runs Linux and it makes me feel good showing the "way" to someone else who lived, breathed, and only thought Windows was the one and only.

I have 2 laptops and 1 desktop. 1 laptop is a $300 sony vaio that I was given from a co-worker from a windows failure and put Ubuntu on. I use that primarily. The desktop was $800 in 2004 and uses Windows Xp and is used only for a windows based art program that can cut vinyl(But I've been tweaking Inkscape to do everything for me)
the other laptop was $1200 has Vista and I use that rarely for Visual Studio, Photoshop, and MS Access for a database app I am trying to dissect.

To wrap up a post I could probably write a heck of a lot more, really sit and think about what it is you want to do with your computing needs. I am more than certain everything you will need to do as an average user or even an above average user, you can accomplish with Linux. I've found more open source, free software that I can use for work and personal life and everything else can be thrown in the cloud.

Give Linux a good solid try, and I'm sure you will be more than satisfied. My XP machine will be get a few upgrades and Ubuntu installed in the coming months. My Vista machine will remain as-is because I really have no reason to change it...........yet.

drklunk
April 29th, 2011, 04:58 AM
Ever since I bought my laptop Ive been using Ubuntu. I started on 9.10 about a year and a half ago and I will never make a full switch back to Windows. If I were to build another PC it would probably be a dual boot machine since the only reason I would is for gaming.

Im still very rough around the edges as far as understanding how Linux actually works, I was a Windows master almost haha. It was a welcome switch and Ubuntu has everything I could want and more. Im now a full time Ubuntu user and it can only get better