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dataw0lf
December 1st, 2004, 05:00 PM
What's your favorite IDE for development? Personally, I use jedit for PHP web development at work and for PHP and Python development at home, and vim for C/C++. Jedit is a modular JRE based IDE that supports numerous useful plugins. Vim... well, vim is just vim. ;)
dataw0lf

Enygma
December 1st, 2004, 06:32 PM
I've been using Eclipse for about a year now, been playing around with MonoDevelop too for C#

Can't beat good ol' emacs tho! :)

randomZ
December 1st, 2004, 08:00 PM
Since I currently mostly program in D (http://www.digitalmars.com/d/), I use a combination of jEdit and SCons (http://www.scons.org/), since it lets me edit and build my programs the same way in Linux and Windows.

Quest-Master
December 1st, 2004, 09:57 PM
I'm currently using KDevelop (most likely will move to Anjuta) for programs, and the lovely Quanta Plus for web design.

jdong
December 1st, 2004, 10:02 PM
Though I like everything else about GNOME, I still am a 100% KDevelop fan!

gborbolla
December 1st, 2004, 11:12 PM
For Java I've been using Eclipse for about two years and its great, you can find a plugin for almost everything you need.

For C/C++ I've got to go with vim and command line, haven't found an IDE yet, CDT (Eclipse plugin for C/C++) is still very inmature.

jdodson
December 2nd, 2004, 12:08 AM
gedit.

BWF89
December 2nd, 2004, 01:58 AM
I am useing Visual Basic.NET in my computer class. I thought programming would be so cool but it's really boring and agitating...

randy
December 2nd, 2004, 06:15 AM
GEdit and ant or autoconf/automake depending on what language I'm programming in.

Daniel G. Taylor
December 2nd, 2004, 06:41 AM
gedit.
Same here, for Python, PHP, C++, and a bit of C, etc.

When not using GNU/Linux or GNOME you'll find me using Smultron. Neither Gedit or Smultron are IDE's, though. I usually work in simple, syntax-highlighting editors with language and API references open in Firefox or Safari and bash open to compile and test. Quick and efficient :)

jdong
December 2nd, 2004, 11:42 PM
I am useing Visual Basic.NET in my computer class. I thought programming would be so cool but it's really boring and agitating...

Hint.... lose the VB. Your life will improve miraculously.

HungSquirrel
December 3rd, 2004, 08:59 AM
For HTML, PHP, and CSS I use vim with syntax highlighting. For Java, I use Eclipse. While I like its features, I detest the fact that it's written in Java and uses so many resources. Give me back my clockcycles and RAM, please!

MatthewMetzger
December 3rd, 2004, 09:06 AM
For HTML, CSS, PHP I use bluefish. I use vim a lot for editing linux and apache config files.

BWF89
December 3rd, 2004, 06:02 PM
Hint.... lose the VB. Your life will improve miraculously.
All were doing is simple stuff like useing varitables instead of me.totaltextbox.text=me.bluetextbox.text+me.yellow textbox.text and I'm allready confused. To be honest I don't think any type of programming is right for me. I'd much rather get into the hardware side of computers and work at a computer shop...

froogle
December 3rd, 2004, 06:02 PM
NetBeans for Java stuff - can't beat the built in WYSIWYG editors for doing rich user interface stuff, although if ever Eclipse come out with an easy to configure plug in for SWT, I'll probably switch.

Still stuck with Windows and Dreamweaver though for Web UI stuff.

jeremy
December 3rd, 2004, 07:14 PM
I use quanta for html and cssed for, you guessed it, css.

I am managing quite well, but the one programme I really miss from my windows days is topstyle pro.
I wish that there was something as good for linux (if it already exists, please tell me!).

Daniel G. Taylor
December 3rd, 2004, 10:27 PM
All were doing is simple stuff like useing varitables instead of me.totaltextbox.text=me.bluetextbox.text+me.yellow textbox.text and I'm allready confused. To be honest I don't think any type of programming is right for me. I'd much rather get into the hardware side of computers and work at a computer shop...
You should maybe take a look at Python (http://python.org) and the various tutorials on the net. Also see this thread:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=6869&highlight=python

The whole GUI / signal / objects thing in VB may be a bit much for a beginning lanuage as it's all just thrown at you. With Python you can start small, even in interactive mode and just test out commands, and work your way up to the more advanced topics (including most of what VB can do and more). You also get the advantage of having your programs work on multiple platforms, and to be honest I just have a great time whenever coding something in Python (and I'm sure I'm not the only one).

That said, hardware sounds fun, and I wish I had gotten more into that side of things as well (just for the knowledge, I still want to program).

lockenkeyster
December 3rd, 2004, 10:40 PM
emacs all the way... = )

Hikaru79
December 7th, 2004, 01:51 AM
w00t for Eclipse! Actually, Java is the only language I actually use an IDE for. Ruby, Python, PHP, etc, GNOME's text editor with syntax coloring is good enough for me :)

bazuka
December 7th, 2004, 02:12 AM
What do you guys recommend for stupid noobs? I have been thinking about starting, but don't have any idea where to do that from.

Hikaru79
December 7th, 2004, 02:45 AM
Well, what language, bazuka? If you're a total beginner, I reccomend Ruby. http://ruby-lang.org

There's an IDE for it named 'FreeRIDE' but I don't reccomend it. Just use the ruby interpretyer 'irb'. It's on Synaptic :)

bazuka
December 7th, 2004, 03:24 AM
Well, what language, bazuka? If you're a total beginner, I reccomend Ruby. http://ruby-lang.org

There's an IDE for it named 'FreeRIDE' but I don't reccomend it. Just use the ruby interpretyer 'irb'. It's on Synaptic :)
Geh... I hate to admit this, but I used to program on my apple II e, and I currently do logon script stuff with KiX. It's shameful, I know. I can GOTO like something you've never seen. I think it came from the Hardy Boys books. ;)


Realistically, I'd like to work on something portable, and something that will prepare me for better languages.

Hikaru79
December 7th, 2004, 04:06 AM
I can GOTO like something you've never seen.

Hehehe. :-D

Well, in that case, I stand beside my original suggestion of Ruby. It's portable, and it will definetly help prepare you for Object-Oriented Programming (Ruby is VERY OO). Of course, Python/Perl work too.

If you're interested in starting Ruby, here's two excellent books that will teach you everything you need to go from n00b to l33t h4><0rz ;)

http://www.ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/
http://poignantguide.net

bazuka
December 7th, 2004, 04:30 AM
Sweet... thanks for the linkage.

BWF89
December 7th, 2004, 04:58 AM
Ok, I'm trying out Python 2.4 and it seems pretty good so far. Although so far all I have done is Hello, World!...

I doubt I'll ever need to program for a living or even as part of my job but it's good (and fun) to know...

Lovechild
December 7th, 2004, 12:22 PM
I'm getting quite fond of MonoDevelop, but Visual Studio.NET is one sexy app as well.

skafer
December 7th, 2004, 01:55 PM
My favorite ide is Eclipse

HungSquirrel
December 7th, 2004, 04:34 PM
What's a good free Linux IDE for C/C++? Preferably with mistake highlighting and a certain amount of code completion if possible. I refuse to use Eclipse anymore now that I'm done with my Java class. :)

randy
December 7th, 2004, 04:55 PM
I'd go with Eclipse and there C/C++ plugin. It's the best C/C++ IDE that I've ever used. You might want to try anjuta though.

Klunk
December 7th, 2004, 06:14 PM
NetBeans for Java stuff - can't beat the built in WYSIWYG editors for doing rich user interface stuff, although if ever Eclipse come out with an easy to configure plug in for SWT, I'll probably switch.

Still stuck with Windows and Dreamweaver though for Web UI stuff.

Have you tried the Visual Editor from the Eclipse project ?

Quest-Master
December 8th, 2004, 02:04 AM
I use Anjuta for all of my C/C++ stuff.

Gnome's text editor (gEdit) is used for Python, Java, PHP, and all of my other work.

protocol
December 9th, 2004, 08:36 PM
Hmm. Well I myself am more of a vim person. But a couple of "buddies" of mine *cough* have also suggested me Jedit, which, also kicks ****. It is an awesome IDE...only problem? It's Java. But overall a good IDE. But I still love vim :-D

charleyramm
December 10th, 2004, 05:48 AM
I've been doing perl / cgi recently and using nano. Its lovely. Bluefish /Nvu /notepad for html. Nvu mostly just for marking up 'content' with links, etc. Bluefish for finishing.

Nvu is a pretty good standin for dreamweaver imho. So long as you know html ok already. I find i get in a mess with dreamweaver / dreamweaver clones. I just use them for writing stuff up. Type setting would you call it?...8-[

By the way, does anyone know a good resource for cgi programming with python? I bought a book on perl/cgi already. But then it's pretty interchangable anyway i suppose.

SyL
December 10th, 2004, 11:25 AM
For Java only eclipse rulez

Daniel G. Taylor
December 10th, 2004, 09:32 PM
By the way, does anyone know a good resource for cgi programming with python? I bought a book on perl/cgi already. But then it's pretty interchangable anyway i suppose.
I can't really say much for CGI with python, but I can point you to mod_python (http://modpython.org), which lets you use Python for web programming. There is also a [relatively new] module included called PSP which lets you use Python just like PHP (within pages). You can find a quick tutorial that I wrote on that here (http://programmer-art.org/mod_python).

JeffS
December 14th, 2004, 12:40 AM
I use:
gEdit
Glade
Anjuta
command line: gcc, g++, gdb, make, javac, perl

gEdit really is a very nice editor - simple to use and very useful. I like the tabs and the text highlighting.

Glade, once I got used to it, is really awesome for point and click WYSIWYG Gnome interface design, and building the shell script that puts it all together (with make, automake, etc.).

Anjuta is a really nice IDE, which I've grown to like better than KDevelop (fo me, KDevelop is big and complicated).

gcc rocks as a compiler, and make rocks as well (once you're used to it).

I tried Eclipse for a while, but found it dead-dog slow (at least on the 300MHz, 228 meg RAM system I ran it on, yet all other IDE's and tools ran great). I also found Eclipse kind of counter intuitive.

JBuilder is pretty good, but expensive for a full version.

Visual Studio is probably MS's best product, and greatest strength. It sets the bar for IDE's, frankly.

I've used Emacs a little bit. It seems quite powerful. But I found having to memorize so many commands in order to get stuff done to be prohibitive. I also found the interface of XEmacs to be butt ugly. If Emacs ever comes out in a GTK+/Gnome version, that conforms to Gnome HIG, that provides most of the functionality with buttons and menus, etc, but still gives the same commands, then I'd gladly give it a whirl.

kamstrup
December 14th, 2004, 08:16 AM
Anjuta! (I only wished it had LaTeX highlighting...)

gheorghe_pop
December 14th, 2004, 09:51 AM
I use NetBeans 4 RC2(I can't wait for the 4 release to come ;) ) and gedit for the mySQL PHP HTML work.

Poldi
December 14th, 2004, 02:27 PM
I use NetBeans 4 RC2(I can't wait for the 4 release to come ;) ) and gedit for the mySQL PHP HTML work.


me, too. NetBeans 4.0 RC2 is it. sadly it looks absolutely crap when you try to use the Gtk2-LookAndFeel on Ubuntu because the Industrial Gtk-engine is not supported.

apart from that I really hope that more love will go into the future Ubuntu<->Java integration in the future.

kind regards,
Carsten

gamehack
December 14th, 2004, 07:34 PM
Hello all,

I've been working with linux for 3 years now and have been using it mainly as a development platform(php,mysql,c++,gtk). Recently I switched to gvim as an editor/IDE-like for every language. And I want to ask what editors/IDEs are you using? Do you use bluefish, Anjuta etc? Do you think that (g)vim with the plugins is better that other editors and why? The only thing I miss in vim is the ability to have a dictionary file with all functions in PHP say and when I type mysql_ and press Ctrl+Space to display a menu with all available functions.... So what's your opinion here?

Cheers,
gamehack

Quest-Master
December 14th, 2004, 11:50 PM
I use Anjuta for all of my C++ stuff, SCREEM for all of my web design, and gEdit for other stuff like Python and Javascript.

Daniel G. Taylor
December 15th, 2004, 03:57 AM
Erm, dupe?

http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=6762
(And has been moved to this thread :) ) -dataw0lf

jwenting
December 16th, 2004, 02:37 PM
favourite:
Always been JBuilder (and Delphi and C++ Builder which work similar)
Eclipse is also very nice.
Apart from those two, VI(m) and jExt.

As to the best for beginners: no IDE at all. Use a text editor and commandline compiler. All the wizzards and stuff in IDEs will prevent you from learning the language and instead make you learn the tool.

Eclipse visual editor: slow and somewhat clunky, but then I'm used to the excellent JBuilder.

MS Visual Studio .NET is also quite good, certainly the best Microsoft has yet produced and now quite a pleasure to work with (where 6.0 was a disaster).

IBM VisualAge is/was terrible. All the more surprising that its replacement, Eclipse, is so good.

dataw0lf
December 16th, 2004, 04:51 PM
As to the best for beginners: no IDE at all. Use a text editor and commandline compiler. All the wizzards and stuff in IDEs will prevent you from learning the language and instead make you learn the tool.
Well said.
dataw0lf

lordan
December 30th, 2004, 11:20 PM
IDE: zsh with vim (or possibly nvi) as my editor (plus of course a number of other utilities, such as make, diff, cat and whathaveyounot). Honestly, the Unix shell and utilities really make for a great IDE. Couple that with your editor of choice, and you have all you need in most cases.

I have toyed around with a number of IDEs: Anjuta, Eclipse, Screem and most recently MonoDevelop, but I always go back to just using Vim. IDEs always sound so good when you read about them..

One thing about Vi and clones, they *are* poison. I cannot use something like gedit, because I end up with funny ':wq's scattered all over my files.

elwis
December 31st, 2004, 03:16 PM
I use Eclipse for all my Java stuff. Used to run Stanis python Editor (SPE) for my python stuff. Usually it's a lot of gEdit, VIM etc.
One problem is, on my slower macjines I would really like a nice Java tool, Eclipse is too hungry. I tried to get the plugins for emacs to work, but that was kind of complicated. Also used jEdit, it's ok, but i never got the code-completition to work (I'm still a rookie when it comes to Swing/SWT so i would like the help from it ;)

Sensebend
January 3rd, 2005, 06:49 AM
Visual Studio .Net 2003 - Microsoft's killer app.

poster_nutbag
January 3rd, 2005, 04:07 PM
Previous post is a troll, right?

I've never seen MS come out with a good IDE yet. Colourfull, flashy and with lots of buttons, yes, but not good to actually use.

Quest-Master
January 3rd, 2005, 06:35 PM
I like .NET because of it's cross-platform ability but don't like it being "owned" by Microsoft, and certainly don't like how end-users on Windows have to download the Framework.

Plus, poster_nutbag is totally right about their IDEs. All it has going for it is looks, and nothing much more which makes it better than something like Anjuta. :)

elwis
January 3rd, 2005, 08:35 PM
agreed. Using and compiling .NET studio demands a lot of cash to put on hardware. We quickly dropped it at work, who has the time and money to have the dwhole developer staff drinking coffee while spending 25% of the workday compiling... and doing nothing..

Nope, still wait to see the day when something actually useful comes from Redmond..

mfuger
January 3rd, 2005, 09:03 PM
I once had a roommate who was a Computer Science major. Somehow, probably because of his major and because he did an internship with Microsoft, he got a free copy of everything .NET when it first came out. He just raved about it for days. Meanwhile, he's got the most stable Windows system I have ever seen. He tried for a week to crash it. Eventually, since he had a TV card, he set the TV feed as his desktop background. It worked for about 5 seconds, then exploded.
Not really. But that's how rediculously stable his machine was. Maybe that and the fact that he liked .NET are related. I don't know.

All I know is that I hated Windows. It didn't go a week without inexplicably crashing. Finally I got fed up and install Fedora. Then I tried SuSE, went back to Fedora and have settled on Ubuntu. I love it!!

But, onto the topic of this forum, I use Bluefish. It's free, it's good, and it's not overloaded with features.

bretzel2005
January 5th, 2005, 06:06 PM
I am a hardwired KDevelop user and wish debian/Ubuntu packagers will include this IDE in next works.

btw: vi/vim,gedit,emacs - Are NOT IDE's but otherwize certainly sofisticated source-code editors with some project compilation capabilities...

Eclispe, Anjuta are quasi-IDE - not completes

And even KDevelop isn't as complete as M$-Visual Studio with REAL "intellisense" :-)

Sorry for Emacs/VI purists, but we are in the year 2005...

I have put my hands on feu KDevelop version 2.x regarding QT-signal-slot management(before qt-designer was born) + Class properties dialog - In that era, there were no such feature in any Linux IDE. And even KDevelop version 3 lacks what I did in version 1.4-2.x :-(

lordan
January 5th, 2005, 08:51 PM
btw: vi/vim,gedit,emacs - Are NOT IDE's but otherwize certainly sofisticated source-code editors with some project compilation capabilities...


Well, partly right, Vi is an editor. Emacs is an operating system that includes a text editor called Viper.

I don't think anybody here has claimed that Vi is an IDE. I certainly didn't. I claimed that Vi is my editor. *zsh* + all the normal Unix utilities make up my IDE. If I feel the burning desire to "design forms", I can use Glade, which to me is far easier to use than anything else I've tried.



Eclispe, Anjuta are quasi-IDE - not completes

And even KDevelop isn't as complete as M$-Visual Studio with REAL "intellisense"


So that is your definition of "a real IDE"? An application that has Microsoft-style "intellisense". I'm sorry to have to tell you this, but I think other peoples definition of an IDE will be 'slightly' different.

Quest-Master
January 5th, 2005, 11:28 PM
I'm sorry to have to tell you this, but I think other peoples definition of an IDE will be 'slightly' different.

I second this.

Truly, I really don't see where KDevelop shines where Anjuta doesn't either. :\ Though KDevelop is also another genius piece of software. :)

chz
January 7th, 2005, 10:57 AM
i'm having issues with anjuta. anybody successfully get it working? whenever i try to start a new project...it just gives me some ERROR message through the debug window on the bottom. i dont understand how everybody else is able to work with it unless you all may have built it from source rather than from dl'ing from synaptic.

NicS
January 7th, 2005, 03:01 PM
Anjuta and Scite, both of them are based on Scintilla (correct me if i'm wrong)

I've been looking around for a good editor and Scite is really one of the best (at least it suits me the best).

It is an all-scripable Editor in Lua (i don't know lua at all, but you don't need to know lua to use it)
And overall, it uses lexers to parse api files.

I have autocompletion of words and fuctions in perl, java and my own programs.

It's great, have a look.
It's a shame that this editor is not more known.

Scite and Scintilla web site (http://www.scintilla.org/SciTE.html)

zarniwoop
January 8th, 2005, 09:13 PM
I have been trying to get Anjuta on Ubuntu for ages. How did you do it? I can't see it on Synaptic and I 'm not sure how to compile it. So I've been using Bloodshed Developer on windows.

stateq2
January 9th, 2005, 01:00 AM
Can't beat good ol' emacs tho! :)
vim can :D

JConnell
January 9th, 2005, 04:50 AM
Anjuta for C/C++
FreeRIDE for Ruby
Bluefish for HTML/PHP

Quest-Master
January 9th, 2005, 07:45 PM
I have been trying to get Anjuta on Ubuntu for ages. How did you do it? I can't see it on Synaptic and I 'm not sure how to compile it. So I've been using Bloodshed Developer on windows.
Err.. sudo apt-get install anjuta.

Make sure you have universe/multiverse installed btw.

Device
January 10th, 2005, 08:38 PM
Vim

Error1312
January 18th, 2005, 08:31 PM
NetBeans for Java
Visual Studio NET for C# in Windows, KDevelop (for C, C++) in Linux

jerome bettis
January 18th, 2005, 10:51 PM
eclipse 3.0 and netbeans 4.0 for java. if one starts acting funny i switch to the other one for a few days. between the two, i like eclipse better. netbeans is a little clunky, but it has some good features too.

and if neither one of them is behaving right, i use pico. :p

lee_connell
January 20th, 2005, 07:21 PM
screem/bluefish for html (free)
wingide for python (www.wingide.com) 35 bucks for personal.
gonna give gedit and vim a try for python since i see all these posts about it. I do use vim regularly for editing config files and love it.

DoubleDangerClub
January 20th, 2005, 09:46 PM
I use:

On linux:
Zend Studio for anything web related.
gEdit for Java.

On Windows:
Homesite 5.5 for anything web related.
JCreator for Java.

lizardking
January 21st, 2005, 03:40 AM
anjuta IDE C++
Eclipse java
support gedit with termial

whitehat
January 24th, 2005, 01:29 AM
My favorite IDE would probably be Bluefish, its fairly well inigrated into the system to allow for quick compiling for about any language and is also configured for syntax highlighting with most languages.

Although I'm also a fan of vim, its a clean text environment and not as bloated as emacs.

bretzel2005
January 29th, 2005, 04:52 AM
Well, partly right, Vi is an editor. Emacs is an operating system that includes a text editor called Viper.

I don't think anybody here has claimed that Vi is an IDE. I certainly didn't. I claimed that Vi is my editor. *zsh* + all the normal Unix utilities make up my IDE. If I feel the burning desire to "design forms", I can use Glade, which to me is far easier to use than anything else I've tried.



So that is your definition of "a real IDE"? An application that has Microsoft-style "intellisense". I'm sorry to have to tell you this, but I think other peoples definition of an IDE will be 'slightly' different.

You're also right on that each of us have a different view of what defines something...
I want to point one thing tho: -I-ntegrated -D-velopment -Environment (I-D-E) what is that ???
-Environment: What could be an "Environment" ( in Linux/UN*X/Windows OSes ) there may be all the tools such cmdline/auto-scripts/Shell global vars, editors, builders etc...and ... and in first place: programming language specializations.

-Development: compilers/linkers/interpreters ??? hmmm yes - no much arguments here except that we could expand Development by including every kind of tools in a cyclic definition --- (uh?).

-Integrated: Oh!! that's the obscure / not really definitive clear point ... And Here are the differences about who see what... There are So MANY Technologies...IDE would integrates : Application templates source-codes; Integrated or supported GUI builders; Auto-code completion ( such M$-intellisense) Compilers and linkers
;configurations scripts ... etc..etc... Such a Software that integrates all needed tools from the begining to the final (linking) build steps, runtime interactive debugger... could be an IDE.

What I am actually reading here is that some poeple tend to miss interpret the actual topic ,forgetting the original question: "What is your favorite IDE? " by turning the question to ::
" What are your favorite development tools ?"
-- Hehehe


Ciao
Bretzel
P.S.: Gedit is an IDE? DUH!
I LOVE VI(m) and read that it is a (positively) powerful configurable editor.
Eclipse(3.0) is very cool real IDE for Java and also Netbeans4.0- But not my favorite in that for my needs, it haven't much C/C++ integration as KDevelop or M$-VC++ IDE. Yet, KDevelop is KDE/QT specialized IDE and have some generic C/C++ env.

P.S2:Me too I have been using primitive high technical tools such a compiler/linker switches by hands and even written assembly language programs ( On: Atari 600XL; Commodore 64/128=Motorla 6502/10/Amiga=68000 xx) And ...I uh...dunnoo why I feel the need to expose my skills here....(joke)

Jad
January 29th, 2005, 10:34 AM
Zend Studio all the way!

Mute
February 10th, 2005, 11:54 PM
Windows: Depends on the project but either VC++ 6.0 or Metrowerks Codewarrior.
Linux: Visually Kdevelop (especially the new version). Normally (console) Vim - C, perl, python, shell.

-Mute

kleeman
February 11th, 2005, 03:24 AM
Eclipse with the new Photran plugin for Fortran (yes there still some of us left \\:D/ )

defkewl
February 12th, 2005, 06:16 PM
I still use vi for remote connection. I like it over any other IDE such as EMacs, pico or Nano.

For Java I use: Eclipse and NetBeans
For PHP I use: Dev-PHP
For CSS I use: Top-style
For HTML I use: Nvu and Notepad++

anthony_barker
February 12th, 2005, 06:50 PM
emacs + ipython + vi

Koobi
February 14th, 2005, 03:11 PM
90% of my work is PHP and I use Vim for it.
The rest is mostly XHTML+CSS for which I use Vim too

waratah
February 21st, 2005, 02:36 AM
For the life of me I cannot figure out eclipse. I want to try it out but I cannot figure out how to make this work on C / C++ code. Yes I read doco but it talks abouit getting things and installing them, I want to apt-get install 'eclipse for c/c++' not fiddle round learning editor configuration.

shimon
February 24th, 2005, 03:09 PM
What do you guys recommend for stupid noobs? I have been thinking about starting, but don't have any idea where to do that from.
If you want to be stupid then vb.
If your a n00b but don't want to be stupid python

lgoss007
February 24th, 2005, 06:30 PM
MS Visual Studio 7.1 and Borland C++BuilderX:

It is far easier to get a program compiling and running if you're not familiar with makefiles. And workspace/project files greatly simplify the building of programs. I started on Borland TurboPascal in high school, then moved to Borland C++. The transition to MSVC later was easy and intellisense made coding so much easier as I didn't have to go searching through helpfiles or header files as much. I don't care much for the forms designer though (the designer itself is ok, but the code is wack).

I used C++ BuilderX right about when it first came out, which was also when I was starting to getting into Linux (which is the reason I tried it out). Being able to use the same project files across Linux and Windows was very nice, and it was simple to use platform specific stuff as I could just create a folder in the project to only be built under certain platforms. While the project stuff was nice though, I found myself using text editors to change code though since the BuilderX IDE was so slow, which is also the same reason I quit using Eclipse.

I've used Kdevelop back when I used Mandrake (the only distro I liked coming from Windows), but now that I'm on Ubuntu I'm seeing if I can get by without KDE. So I've tried Anjuta and I think I like the interface a little better, and I'm hoping Anjuta 2.0 comes out soon (and is put into Ubuntu).

Of course all of that is for C++, which is what I do most. The rest (PHP, Python, Perl, etc.) I just do in Gedit (which isn't really an IDE). I'd really like to get involved in some projects (like GTK, Anjuta, OGRE, ...), but I always run into problems getting all of the dependencies built, setup correctly, running on my system, etc.

psychic
March 3rd, 2005, 03:41 PM
anjuta, or when i am just scripting (python / ruby) vim

Bubbling Zombie
March 8th, 2005, 08:41 PM
for web based stuff/xml/... ---> bluefish
java --->eclipse

manstrike
March 8th, 2005, 09:58 PM
anjuta
eclipse
monodevelop
cbuilderx

dewfis
March 10th, 2005, 02:00 AM
I like KDev a lot, and have fooled with Anjuta and a few others.

Problem is, I learned UNIX development at the command line. Once you're familiar with that, it just seems easier than anything else.

michux
March 13th, 2005, 01:06 PM
For HTML, PHP, and CSS I use vim with syntax highlighting. For Java, I use Eclipse. While I like its features, I detest the fact that it's written in Java and uses so many resources. Give me back my clockcycles and RAM, please!

You shouldn't detest the fact that it is written in Java, but rather detest the fact that it is badly written.
Try IntelliJ Idea, a commercial IDE, also written in Java. Takes 50-100MB of memory for a very large project (compared to 200-300MB for the same project in Eclipse) . Very responsive, rich featured and works flawlessly on a 1.6Ghz, 1GB RAM Athlon laptop (powered by Ubuntu).

I'm not writing it to advertise Idea (although it's the best Java IDE I know) but to make you realise that Java programs can be responsive and efficient.

AdrianBrown
March 13th, 2005, 10:39 PM
For Java I use Eclipse (and Websphere Studio Application Developer - based on Eclipse - when I'm at work). I love it to bits.

And to stir up a hornets nest I prefer the mainframe SPF editor to vi :razz: Shame you can't get a version for Linux.

vinayak
March 14th, 2005, 01:05 PM
hi,

Eclipse is the best known IDE.......
Anjuta would be the second

polymorphic
March 15th, 2005, 12:23 AM
Hi. My favourite is Anjuta, which I've been using about a year now. I've got Ubuntu running on my laptop, and use C and Gnome libraries for a personal project, and Glade for the UI. I've also looked at MonoDevelop a bit, and may use that for a couple of c# projects in the future, when my C app gets further on.

Professionally I use Delphi on windows in an enterprise application. The differences between the environments is interesting. My co-workers have heard me curse and swear at Windows event handling and gui behaviour on many occasions, and then I rant on about Gtk and how it just works. (e.g. standard windows development practice is absolute positioning of everything on forms, which breaks as soon as someone changes fonts or whatever, rather than using containers for everything like a real development platform. And God forbid that we need i18n!)

Anyway, Anjuta works very well for me. I think the developers are doing a good job there.

My 2c worth.

Mark

polymorphic
March 15th, 2005, 12:27 AM
Vim

Well, it's better than "cat >main.c" I guess.

Marginally :-)

Pse
March 15th, 2005, 09:30 AM
In Windows I manage with Dev-Cpp, which is nice, but a bit buggy in some areas...and it totally lacks a resource editor (there are 1 or 2 good options for that out there, though)...and in Linux I've just played a bit with Kdevelop...I think I'll try Anjuta, as I had never heard about it up until a few days ago when I saw a post somewhere...](*,)

nullzero
March 15th, 2005, 03:38 PM
im using Eclipse and can't get enough of it!
Is rocks for Java, and with CDT its pretty good to C/C++.
Also there are loads of plugins for anything you can imagine,making Eclipse my 1st choice tool for every little pinch of programming

std
March 16th, 2005, 11:22 AM
I rarely use any IDE because most of what I write doesn't involve GUI. I recently had to get the hang of qt designer but I didn't like it too much, aside from the helps it wastes way less time on designing the GUI. But I can't use that alone, it does make a good pair with emacs.
Some time ago I'd use Anjuta, also a very good IDE which I do recommend to everyone. I don't use anymore lately because I don't really feel the need for it. But yes, it's a very good IDE.
I was also impressed by WideStudio a few weeks ago when I experimented with Solaris. I recently saw there's a WS deb package for Ubuntu. Well worth a try.

mcclane
March 18th, 2005, 10:42 AM
Visual Basic is a programming language :-s

I thought it was someones idea of a joke ... :p

Vrok
March 21st, 2005, 11:23 AM
Well, I use Vim. I'm waiting for Vim 7 - it's going to be superb! Just take a look at survey results here - http://www.vim.org/sponsor/vote_results.php - if Bram takes this survey seriously, nobody will use Emacs except RMS :cool:
I just miss that KVim isn't usable now.

TjaBBe
March 22nd, 2005, 03:29 PM
I mainly use Vim for my development work. That is: Java, PHP, C++ etc. When making a GUI app I think I'll go for Anjuta though. I like KDevelop too, too bad it's a KDE app :neutral: .

dataw0lf
March 26th, 2005, 05:20 AM
I like KDevelop too, too bad it's a KDE app :neutral: .
..you can still use it though! I've just started using KDevelop, and I must say I'm pretty impressed. Especially with the wxWidgets support.
sudo apt-get install kdevelop3

vague-
March 29th, 2005, 06:21 PM
For C, C++: Emacs, jEdit, Vim - depends on how I feel :)
For Common Lisp, Haskell, Python, Scheme: Emacs - brace bouncing, smart alignment, Quack, Slime all work best here
For Java: IntelliJ IDEA - tried near everything else, nothing beats it
For Perl: jEdit or Vim - my Perl always seems to break Emacs' font lock :(
For XML/XHTML: jEdit - nicest XML editing experience

If I could only have one program, then I guess it would be jEdit. It is a pretty good all-rounder and straight-forward for everything (even it's Lisp modes suck). Contrary to some opinions, I would consider all of the above to be IDEs (or at least pseudo-IDEs). The only aspect that the text editors do not give me is project genesis and management, but that is because I choose to do that manually.

I thought Eclipse was okay, and definitely the most impressive open source effort at a full-blown IDE. I did not like Anjuta or KDevelop, but that was a while ago. I cannot see myself changing without some major reason for now.

StonePiano
April 9th, 2005, 12:02 PM
vi

http://thomer.com/vi/vi.html

oldmarti
April 11th, 2005, 09:10 AM
I like SciTe editor and Gedit. But... SciTe have nice option - Tools->biuld. I can start make without exiting my source file. In gedit - no tools ;(. Gedit can open more source files, SciTe only one. Where I can found a editor with boot options? (like windows Ultraedit). Anjuta and Kdevelop is too heavy for me, vim is too difficult :-)

Seth
April 18th, 2005, 06:23 AM
I looooove Eclipse for Java. It is not quite there with PHP (the PHPEclipse plugin) so I use Quanta+ for that.

nautilus
April 18th, 2005, 08:33 AM
I went from Vim, to Anjuta, and now KDevelop.

I do C, C++, Perl, Ferite, PHP, and some Python on the side.

ZiZe
April 20th, 2005, 07:05 PM
I've tried Borland CBuilderX, Kdevelop, anjuta and eclipse.
Right now im learning c++ myself, and i think eclipse is far better than any of the others.

i use ecplise with the CDT and php plugin for php and c++

fat_larry
April 20th, 2005, 07:44 PM
Java at work: Eclipse on WinXP
Java at home: Eclipse on Ubuntu
PHP at home: Kate on Ubuntu

Eclipse is a fat bas7ard but I love it so

paul cooke
April 20th, 2005, 08:25 PM
I am useing Visual Basic.NET in my computer class. I thought programming would be so cool but it's really boring and agitating...

Programming IS cool... what you are doing however is called coding... and is seriously boring...

I'm a Systems Analyst by profession... I get to design and specify the structure and logic of the program... coders then take my specification and code it up... I have a lot of respect for our programming team, but they are only implementing what I've told them to do...

I don't actually work in any real code at all, I write in pseudocode to explain the logic along with state diagrams to explain the flow. Occasionally I get a bit more formal and break into using UML.

paul cooke
April 20th, 2005, 08:28 PM
Hehehe. :-D

Well, in that case, I stand beside my original suggestion of Ruby. It's portable, and it will definetly help prepare you for Object-Oriented Programming (Ruby is VERY OO). Of course, Python/Perl work too.

If you're interested in starting Ruby, here's two excellent books that will teach you everything you need to go from n00b to l33t h4><0rz ;)

http://www.ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/
http://poignantguide.net

the programming Ruby one is available electronically in the Ubuntu repositories along with Ruby 1.8 and a whole host of add-ons for it to handle interfaces with other code.

paul cooke
April 20th, 2005, 08:33 PM
agreed. Using and compiling .NET studio demands a lot of cash to put on hardware. We quickly dropped it at work, who has the time and money to have the dwhole developer staff drinking coffee while spending 25% of the workday compiling... and doing nothing..

Nope, still wait to see the day when something actually useful comes from Redmond..

get them extra machines to do the building on, then they haven't got the excuse to sit around swigging coffee for 25% of the time... You pay them to code, not drink coffee... so buy some extra machines, you'll save in the long run...

If they spend 25% of their time waiting, then you'll need one extra machine between every four programmers...

hamiltjr
April 21st, 2005, 04:59 PM
Anjuta!

sas
April 21st, 2005, 06:56 PM
I've just tried Glade and MonoDevelop (C#) and despite putting a couple of hours into it couldn't get it to work...I'm not a fan of the way that you have to create your own signal events etc and I didn't really like the "box model" either, though I could get used to it I think

Going to try Anjuta now....

fdoving
April 21st, 2005, 07:23 PM
vim is the one and only for me.

d0nk
April 24th, 2005, 10:18 PM
I use a mix of kdevelop, gedit, and vim for all my stuff... sometimes nano too, but rarely...

All depends on the languge

sas
April 24th, 2005, 11:43 PM
I've just tried Glade and MonoDevelop (C#) and despite putting a couple of hours into it couldn't get it to work...I'm not a fan of the way that you have to create your own signal events etc and I didn't really like the "box model" either, though I could get used to it I think

Going to try Anjuta now....

Upon playing with this (and actually drawing my program out on paper and planning the "box model", i've abruptly changed my mind :), the box model is quite a sweet way of doing things.

trotsky
April 29th, 2005, 04:04 PM
Although being a gnome user I use kdevelop. I used eclipse before, but it's so slooow, and C/C++ support isn't the best. Kdevelop is really nice, with a lot of features. For smaller programs I use jEdit (http://www.jedit.org).

jcs296
April 29th, 2005, 07:40 PM
For Java, I use Eclipse (the 3.1 release is fairly solid). For everything else (mostly Ruby, Perl and HTML) I switch back and forth between jEdit and vim. jedit is fantastic, especially once you add in a couple plugins (just like firefox).

On a side note, I have to agree with the suggestion above of Ruby as a first language...I'm switching to it for my personal projects since you can do so much more (compared to java, for instance) in so few lines. The same is probably true of Python, I just like Ruby syntax more.

-Rick-
May 3rd, 2005, 10:21 PM
KDevelop, Anjuta looks ok but from what I've seen it can't execute your program in another directory, same goes for Eclipse.

bobgreen5s
May 4th, 2005, 01:24 AM
Has anyone been able to get Macromedia Dreamweaver MX2004 working for ubuntu 5.04? I've been trying for a little bit without any luck :(

atoponce
May 4th, 2005, 03:36 AM
What's your favorite IDE for development? Personally, I use jedit for PHP web development at work and for PHP and Python development at home, and vim for C/C++. Jedit is a modular JRE based IDE that supports numerous useful plugins. Vim... well, vim is just vim. ;)
dataw0lf

Kate all the way. HTML, XML, CSS, C++, Java, PHP, SQL, etc., etc., etc. Nothing beats a basic text editor. Sure, you don't have dynamic menus and such, but it is quick, painless, and soooo easy. Although not an IDE, definitely an advanced text editor.

Ed Suspicious
May 5th, 2005, 08:44 PM
I'm using GNU Emacs. I just started, and was using IDLE for working with Python. A few people much wiser than me told me to figure out Emacs so later on when I want to learn other languages I won't have to additionally learn a new environment.

Ronnie Maas
May 9th, 2005, 09:34 AM
jEdit for Parser3, HTML and CSS. Anjuta for learning C/C++.

Red_general
May 22nd, 2005, 02:51 PM
Personally when I am programming for windows, I use visual studio. However when I program for linux, I use QT

nianhbg
May 26th, 2005, 08:24 AM
On Windows:
VisualStudio


On linux:
Gedit

I mostly scripting python. I was looking at SPE but i couldn't get it to work
in ubuntu...

Whistler
May 26th, 2005, 10:55 AM
KDevelop 2

Bavo
May 26th, 2005, 11:23 AM
Eclipse for php, java and c
Of course i use vi and gedit a lot more but only for small changes

Pikdev for assembler :) (for programming pics)

Kyral
May 27th, 2005, 03:55 AM
Anjuta and Bluefish

Gsibbery
May 27th, 2005, 01:01 PM
elvis or vim usually (vi clones).

Teren
May 27th, 2005, 01:03 PM
screen + vim ;)

Haegin
May 27th, 2005, 07:21 PM
because the editor depends on the situation (i.e for a large project you might need project management tools whereas for a small script you don't need the interferance) what would you recommend for:

- a newbie learning a language (so just doing small, one file scripts in quite large quantities)

- a smallish project with a gui and with multiple files etc but done by one person

- a large project with lots of files and a more complicated gui done by a whole team of developers

Does it matter to you whether the tools you use are open source or not?

If you are on gnome do you want to use gnome apps? (and likewise for kde)

Ranulf
June 4th, 2005, 10:48 AM
Having used VB6 and VB.net I was fairly happy with these products. I then started to use eclipse for my third year project at uni written in Java and it was a life saver, by the end the project was about 6000 lines long and it would have been a nightmare to do that in gedit or the like.

I would definately recommend using Eclipse for learning as it so much easier being able to see the options avaiable after pressing dot for method calls, plus the error highlighting means you don;t have to compile about 50 times to try and find all the mistakes.

Lots of people reckon using Vim or Emacs is the way togo, I can't really comment on this I havn't got my head round them and only use vim for reading large (15MB) XML files, for which it rocks I might add. Equally you could always go a bit oldschool and learn Ed; I've heard it's quite intuative :^o .

DarkKnight
June 4th, 2005, 05:25 PM
Kate.

I am mainly a Java monkey, I love OO, however I also dable in PHP and I started my newb days in C++.

After spending time with Java and PHP, C/C++ just seems.... messy.

voidlogic
June 7th, 2005, 01:14 AM
NetBeans all the way (for java), commandline/ajnuta/open watcom for C/C++

overcast
June 26th, 2005, 06:03 PM
well i think i m Kdevelop fan it is good IDE.

m87
July 5th, 2005, 04:22 AM
e m a c s

for everything.
EVERYTHING!

except flash, of course... i appreciate osflash job to port actionscript to be used with eclipse but... honestly... no. until SMIL becomes the GREATEST USABLE etc. etc. format, I will still stick to Macromedia Flash [and cxoffice, sigh]

python_guy
July 5th, 2005, 12:42 PM
In this moment I use SciTE with the following config. I may change to eric3 or wingide soon. I try to use python for web programming.

use.monospaced=1
tabsize=4
indent.size=4
use.tabs=0
strip.trailing.spaces=1

line.margin.visible=1

position.width=576
position.height=400

fold=1
fold.compact=1
fold.flags=16
fold.symbols=1

aCiD2
July 5th, 2005, 01:22 PM
Monodevelop, Eclipse if I'm doing something with C/C++/Java and Glade for interface design. Interesing combination, eh? ;)

ubuntp
July 14th, 2005, 01:35 AM
I've been using Komodo for Python and TCL in Windows, and will probably keep on using it unless there is a better IDE on Linux.

is-serp
July 14th, 2005, 05:08 PM
vim :)

JPatrick
July 14th, 2005, 10:53 PM
KDevelop

Jeigh
July 15th, 2005, 06:18 PM
On my home system I just use gedit mostly currently, although I plan to try out a couple mentioned here.

On the comps at school I use emacs since they have a heavily modded out version that has a bunch of custom features to make certain parts of my assignments less monotonous (but are somewhat pointless in the real world lol)

hzs202
July 27th, 2005, 09:20 PM
VIM Baby Yeah! However, theres a nice little Open-source editor out there called Scintilla... I think thats how its spelled.

zaal
July 28th, 2005, 10:26 PM
mono for me

Mobus
July 29th, 2005, 07:07 AM
anjuta, because that's what I could find, but I might just go out and try vim.

JOKe
July 29th, 2005, 09:15 AM
Eclipse

juice_fi
August 4th, 2005, 07:17 PM
I like KDevelop a lot. And Kate isn't too bad either. But I prefer KDevelop.
Crimson Editor for Windows.

spimoley
August 5th, 2005, 04:43 AM
VisualStudio 2003 \\:D/

npaladin2000
August 5th, 2005, 07:01 AM
Well, I know Java and Pascal/Delphi...so I've messed with Kylix and jEdit. Actually used GVIM under Windows for Java too...heh. :)

I just took the Java class recently, so I haven't looked into whether or not there are GTK/GNOME bindings for it...if there are, I can FINALLY write some of the apps that have been kicking around my head...

Rylem
August 5th, 2005, 05:57 PM
Tough one.

Java - jEdit
HTML,Javascript,DHTML - 1st Page 2000 & Bluefish
PHP - Bluefish
C# - Notepad ( lol )
C++ - Dev C++
Python - eric3
Ruby - eric3

Eclipse and Relo for everything else!

charlieg
August 5th, 2005, 10:43 PM
In this moment I use SciTE with the following config. I may change to eric3 or wingide soon. I try to use python for web programming.

use.monospaced=1
tabsize=4
indent.size=4
use.tabs=0
strip.trailing.spaces=1

line.margin.visible=1

position.width=576
position.height=400

fold=1
fold.compact=1
fold.flags=16
fold.symbols=1

I like SciTE, it has a lot of potential.

stoffe
August 5th, 2005, 11:02 PM
I like SciTE, it has a lot of potential.Me too, all it really lacks (that I feel I need) is a good project/file interface. It's an excellent and lightweight editor. That is also what I feel vim (and gedit, and... ) lacks - there are several takes on such beasts, but I actually do want that dockable side pane. =) Kate is an excellent editor that is almost perfect, but alas, I'm not running KDE right now. =)

And IMO, better defaults, although almost anything I want to do is possible when editing the config. Maybe it should have an interface for that, to make things simpler, but it is not an absolute must.

Oh, and I can't (in hoary) open files in SciTE from Nautilus, it interprets the path wrong somehow I think. Dragging the files in when they are open works though.

David Marrs
August 10th, 2005, 02:39 AM
Previous post is a troll, right?

I've never seen MS come out with a good IDE yet. Colourfull, flashy and with lots of buttons, yes, but not good to actually use.
Have you used VisualStudio.NET? It would be a little much if Microsoft couldn't even make an IDE for their *own* framework, wouldn't it? I haven't used Visual Studio in earnest yet, but so far I haven't found fault with it. It does what an IDE is supposed to do: speed up development. It's also got a well designed interface; cluttered at times, but never untidy or overwhelming.

For web design, I use Bluefish (http://bluefish.openoffice.nl). For ASP.NET web development in Windows I'm currently still on the .NET SDK + Vim, which suits me fine because I'm still learning the ropes, but I expect I'll cough up for VS.NET before very long. I've not yet found a comparable Linux alternative. MonoDevelop (http://www.monodevelop.com/) looks like it might be the closest, but I don't think web applications are on its agenda. Plus the version I have installed crashes at the click of a mouse.

jwenting
August 10th, 2005, 01:01 PM
VS .NET is quite nice. In fact it's pretty darn good overall once you get the hang of it (it's extremely powerful and as a result can be daunting).

I agree that earlier versions were not very good (compared to what companies like Borland produce) but Microsoft really made a quantum leap with the 2002 version.

My favourite must be JBuilder though (and especially the 2005 version), and it's extremely sad that Borland has decided to discontinue it in favour of releasing a new Java IDE based on Eclipse (I in fact moved back from Eclipse to JBuilder last year...).

David Marrs
August 10th, 2005, 05:35 PM
VS .NET is quite nice. In fact it's pretty darn good overall once you get the hang of it (it's extremely powerful and as a result can be daunting).

I agree that earlier versions were not very good (compared to what companies like Borland produce) but Microsoft really made a quantum leap with the 2002 version.

My favourite must be JBuilder though (and especially the 2005 version), and it's extremely sad that Borland has decided to discontinue it in favour of releasing a new Java IDE based on Eclipse (I in fact moved back from Eclipse to JBuilder last year...).
btw, oracle do their own java IDE that's free (of charge, at least) from their website. I've not used it myself (not interested in Java) but I'm told it's very good.

Kedaeus_Sendre
September 2nd, 2005, 03:17 PM
I am useing Visual Basic.NET in my computer class. I thought programming would be so cool but it's really boring and agitating...

Yea.. you know what really sucks?

When you are through with your class.. and try to pick up something else - you will be 2,500x more confused than you are now.. because you picked up a bunch of bad habbits in VB :D

Proprietary languages are horrible tools to learn on. When yeh get frustrated learning something new yeh tend to scrap projects and turn back to your crutch. ](*,)

Which is why you'll always keep a windows box around :(

Parkaboy
September 3rd, 2005, 02:17 AM
I like KDevelop

erguven
September 4th, 2005, 05:54 PM
For HTML, PHP and CSS I use gedit.
For C/C++ I use Anjuta.

JohnMG
September 8th, 2005, 05:47 AM
I can't believe no one's mentioned nedit ( http://www.nedit.org/ ). Simple to use, very fast, good features (like being able to read standard ctags tag files).

Too bad ubuntu only comes with the older 5.4 version. You'll probably have to install manually if you want a more current one (with a tabbed editor window).

I wrote a nedit help sheet if anyone's interested: http://www.simisen.com/jmg/nedit_help.html

.::welemski::.
September 10th, 2005, 08:20 AM
Can anyone atlest enumerate a good IDE for C/C++/C# , Java, Perl,PHP etc

jaac
September 12th, 2005, 10:40 PM
Emacs rulez :D

drogoh
September 13th, 2005, 02:22 AM
Emacs pah! vi for life yoh!

Seriously now, Emacs users are.... well they're not right in the head.

user unknown
September 13th, 2005, 06:31 AM
multiple files: eclipse
one file x11: scite
one file console: midnight-commander
misindented java-code from forums: pled

Skatox
September 14th, 2005, 03:29 PM
For java i use netbeans, and for C++ anjusta, somethings i use eclipse for both languages.

chrizel
September 16th, 2005, 03:37 PM
Well, for programming I use - the one and only - emacs...
Small files etc. with vim. I'm used to both very well but vim for multiple files sucks compared to emacs, so I use emacs primarily for serious programming in C/C++/C#/Lisp/etc.

Velvet Elvis
September 16th, 2005, 06:52 PM
Xemacs for SWI Prolog and LaTeX
kate/Quanta Plus for web stuff (Nvu when I'm lazy)
Eric or IDLE for Python
zile for config files when i manage to break X
SciTe for quick and dirty editing that doesn't require a full IDE

seiflotfy
September 19th, 2005, 02:03 PM
Anjuta is good enough for me

David Marrs
September 20th, 2005, 04:22 PM
Small files etc. with vim. I'm used to both very well but vim for multiple files sucks compared to emacs.

How so?

(To think that I used to laugh at people who started vim/emacs debates... now I'm doing it myself :mad: )

David Marrs
September 21st, 2005, 04:10 PM
PS. That wasn't a rhetorical question, btw. A lot of people recommend Emacs over Vim as a programming interface and I'd like to know if there's something Emacs can do that Vim can't that would make it worth my while learning, or is it just that a lot of people prefer the interface?

chrizel
September 23rd, 2005, 10:03 AM
How so?
Well, I also wouldn't start an vim vs emacs debate, so I say that I'm used to both very well and both have their assets and drawbacks. Both are good editors. IMHO emacs has better multiple buffer handling because in vim, by default you have to save the file every time you switch buffers inside vim. (if you don't use vim windows) There is an option which allows you to switch buffers without the need to save it, but if you quit vim you won't get asked for saving unsaved files... that sort of buffer handling is better solved in emacs IMHO.


PS. That wasn't a rhetorical question, btw. A lot of people recommend Emacs over Vim as a programming interface and I'd like to know if there's something Emacs can do that Vim can't that would make it worth my while learning, or is it just that a lot of people prefer the interface?
What editor you like or hate has very much to do with habit. When I began with emacs after years of vim I was used to vim and it wasn't so easy... but after using emacs some time I got used to it. When i began with emacs my hands got tired by the ugly Control-Alt-XY shortcuts in emacs compared to a vi enviroment with its modes. But sometime I got used to it and today I have no problems with this emacs-like shortcuts. (I even love it today because I can use it in bash and in all MacOS X edit-fields - by default!)

Well, I think emacs is a little more extendable because of the more powerfull emacs lisp. But again, that has very much to do with your habits.

And yes, vim rocks in some parts too... e.g. vim is IMHO better in some core text editing features like the nice visual mode or the block visual mode... I'm a little bit faster in vim in some cases... that's primarily because of the modes-system... but again, modes have their assets and drawbacks...

Today I use both for different purposes... e.g. Emacs obviously has better support for editing lisp files. VIM is better in editing PHP files mixed with HTML... (I didn't find a good emacs php-mode which won't get trouble with mixed HTML/PHP).

UbuWu
September 25th, 2005, 12:32 AM
For python: SPE (Stani's Python Editor)

Unit #134679
September 29th, 2005, 03:28 PM
For Java: Eclipse...definitely Eclipse. I've tried NetBeans and JDeveloper. JD sucks major balls, and NetBeans is alright

Gustav
October 1st, 2005, 02:16 PM
GNU Emacs!!!

You can't live without the Emacs Psychiatrist. :)

naugiedoggie
October 1st, 2005, 04:27 PM
For Java, NetBeans is the real deal. It's a true IDE (Eclipse is a "platform," meaning you get to spend hours configuring it to do simple things NB will do out of the box). One thing I now like about NB is that it is based on ant, the Apache build tool, so if you want to configure your build process to do something extra, it's as simple as modifying the build script. An example would be when you need to include external, non-source files in your final package; you can configure the build script to automatically update those files every time you do a rebuild of the application.
I like emacs for handling html and perl. I've been using emacs for a long time and I haven't found anything better. It's okay for Java, using JDE, but I dislike the elaborate setup process to enable it. And reconfiguring JDE is a royal pain. One thing emacs is really good at is editing files remotely, e.g., you want to make some changes to the HTML files on your web server, emacs can connect to the server via ftp or ssh and edit those files directly.
emacs is also the cat's meow for editing C, I think. The C# mode didn't do anything for me, though. For that, I'd prefer SharpDevelop.
I don't have anything nice to say about Visual Studio. ;-)
Thanks.
mp

Velvet Elvis
October 9th, 2005, 07:52 PM
PS. That wasn't a rhetorical question, btw. A lot of people recommend Emacs over Vim as a programming interface and I'd like to know if there's something Emacs can do that Vim can't that would make it worth my while learning, or is it just that a lot of people prefer the interface?

Emacs is practically a desktop environment unto itself as it can be extended with elisp. It can browse the web, check your mail, talk on irc, and do your laundry all with the same basic interface.

~J~
October 13th, 2005, 08:15 PM
For python: SPE (Stani's Python Editor)

Another vote here for SPE if you're programming in Python.

Toadstool
October 14th, 2005, 12:43 AM
Definitely vim for all my developments, from bash to C, C++, Java. I can't stand huge IDE where you have to click about 20 times to get you executable linked to a new library when you just to quick edit a line in a file with vim :p

sheeparegreat
October 15th, 2005, 12:53 PM
What do you mean Favourite? There is only one....

Emacs (with ECB)

;)

blastradius
October 15th, 2005, 05:30 PM
Got to be Anjuta, thought it looked dull (big thing when you're staring at it for hours) but after installing gtk-qt to give it the KDE look i wouldn't use anything else.
Tried Kdevelop, ok but too much auto-generated stuff and all a bit too much trouble to just write some code. Anjuta is dead easy to use and does all you could want it to.

Brilliant piece of kit!

brockjudkins
October 17th, 2005, 05:38 AM
Emacs!

From http://www.stallman.org/saint.html:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Emacs was originally a text editor, but it became a way of life and a religion. To join the Church of Emacs, you need only say the Confession of the Faith three times:

There is no system but GNU, and Linux is one of its kernels.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

If you've ever heard the Shahadah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahada) (in Islam), the "There is no system but GNU" bit is hillarious.

hw-tph
October 17th, 2005, 09:49 PM
Vim. Hook up a few plugins and it can do pretty much everything, and it's very quick and user friendly in that geeky way.

In Linux and OpenBSD I do all of my editing with it. Plugins like manpageview.vim and SuperTab makes it a joy to use.

H&#229;kan

bored2k
October 17th, 2005, 09:55 PM
Anjuta.

sphinx
October 18th, 2005, 05:00 AM
Intellij IDEA. Far and away the best Development tool for all things Java, bar none.

And in the latest version, you also get kick ass XML, HTML, CSS, JavaScript and Property file editors too, all build in.

Its almost too good. As now I feel downright crippled on even eclipse, let alone vim/gedit + command line.

Yes, I'm addicted. And I've almost reached the point where I'd buy a copy myself if my employer didn't.

SeanCallan
October 18th, 2005, 09:30 PM
C/C++ - gedit or anjuta
Ruby - Mondrian in Windows
CSS/HTML - gedit or bluefish.

I really prefer to develop in gedit or notepad on windows simply because...well it's simple. I don't like my screen having 1000 options for doing things I'll never do. I just like to write my code and compile it.

Simple is better and faster to me

lupo
October 22nd, 2005, 11:02 AM
QUANTA for HTML/CSS/PHP although it isn't a Gnome-App. ;)

LorenzoD
October 26th, 2005, 04:48 AM
The best IDE I have found so far is zsh. And one of the really great things about it is that you can plug in any editor you want. Personally I use vim as my editor component.

Another really great feature that the zsh IDE has is that it always works: in text mode, in Gnome, XFCE, fvwm, kde, on Linux and on *BSD.

Pathogenix
October 26th, 2005, 08:14 PM
I'm still hunting under Linux - I'm currently giving XEmacs a thrash and we'll see if it's any easier to adjust to than bog-standard Emacs.

Under Wind0ze - which is where I earn my living - I use UltraEdit 32, possibly the world's best text editor. Visual Studio is bloated and horrible... the intellisense support for C# is fantastic, but spending a third of my day waiting for it to stop white-screening is not my idea of a productivity boost.

UltraEdit, NAnt, NUnit and a couple of Python scripts do me nicely.

If only there were a Linux version...

darth_vector
October 27th, 2005, 02:41 AM
viva la vim!

jmonteiro
October 28th, 2005, 09:45 PM
I prefere vim (gvim in fact) for programming everything :)

ofek
October 29th, 2005, 12:39 AM
gedit all the way but i won't mind using any normal text editor with syntax coloring support ;) .

LightJak
October 29th, 2005, 01:21 PM
GEdit on Ubuntu, and Dev-C++ on Windows. I'm looking into trying some more though.

p1r0
October 30th, 2005, 04:46 AM
I'm a C++ programmer and I like Anjuta a lot.
It's a friendly inteface and lets me compile easyly

p1r0 -

Moonbuzz
November 4th, 2005, 03:49 AM
Eclipse for Java, Visual Studio for C#, Fujitsu COBOL for COBOL.

vim/gvim for everything else, gedit if I just want to look at something.

I wanted to try either MonoDevelop (Crash upon load) and Kdevelop (not even load).

kanenas.net
November 13th, 2005, 05:58 PM
VI till I die...
;)

tbrownaw
November 13th, 2005, 09:37 PM
editor-with-tabs-and-syntax-coloring (currently gedit) + xterm (currently gnome-terminal)

sometimes I also use mtsh (graphical-scm-frontend)

TheArbiter
November 17th, 2005, 11:56 AM
MonoDevelop (using, of course, mono and programming in C# :) )

Azriphale
November 18th, 2005, 10:23 PM
I have never, on any platform, found an IDE that I like more than KDevelop. With the advent of Ubuntu, I was converted to gnome, and I don't think I can face KDE anymore, but I have found nothing to turn me from KDevelop. Even if I find myself in windows, i'll start up a Debian system within windows (running on colinux www.colinux.org) just so that I can use KDevelop. To me it seems to be the best developed IDE around at the moment. It is, however, like the rest of KDE, a little messy in the interface, but when you get used to it, it works.

I'm also using emacs for some stuff, when I feel like giving it a try.
I used to use vim a lot, and though emacs was horribly complicated, but since I started using it, emacs is actually even simpler than vim. In vim there is all the switching between edit-mode and whatever-the-other-mode-is-called mode. In emacs, there is only one mode, and all the commands are accessed by pressing ctrl+x (C-x) or alt-x (M-x [meta-x]). It becomes easier after a while. And now i'm treating vim like emacs. I used to treat gedit like vim (and ended up with things like :w all over my document :smile: ).

Underhill
November 20th, 2005, 03:25 PM
I'm in love with Netbeans. I like the new intuitive GUI builder (in Netbeans 5 currently in beta 2) Matisse and integration with JBoss and other application server.

jaypeasy
November 21st, 2005, 10:31 AM
emacs rulez!

haocheng
November 21st, 2005, 02:34 PM
I use Eclipse at home and in the office :)

otake-tux
November 23rd, 2005, 02:47 AM
I like Kdevelop cause I can do almost anything easily in python, C and C++ with it.

SuperMike
November 24th, 2005, 01:59 PM
I use Screem IDE + a custom Python/PyGTK tool I wrote for administering my PostgreSQL, in order to write my PHP websites.

xerman
November 25th, 2005, 12:06 AM
I use Screem for X/HTML, PHP and CSS in web design. It's easy, has syntax hilite and is integrated into the gnome-gtk environment.
For creating linux apps, .... well, I'm searching... :confused: C? C+? C++? C#? Phyton? Java?... Anjuta? Eclipse? Mono?... ooou... I'm getting a headache

nazdrug
November 26th, 2005, 07:35 AM
I see that alot of people have mentioned gedit for PHP coding, because syntax highlighing is enough.

Personally, i think gPHPedit is gold! It has code insight, code hints, syntax highlighing... Its super easy to use, much like gedit, but with those extra features ;)

Burke
November 26th, 2005, 09:04 PM
Anyone else think this would have been more useful as a poll?

...and to answer the question, I just switched from Vim to Anjuta. So therefore, I'll say Anjuta.

shan2on_power
November 27th, 2005, 12:46 AM
vi

not vim, not vim for win, vi.

and bluefish, just cause it's colourful if i'm in the mood.

but vi never fails and is the most versatile text editor.

bar none.

shan2on

YourSurrogateGod
December 7th, 2005, 07:09 AM
Visual Studio .NET.

*hides behind a rock so as not to get roasted*

cyaconi
December 7th, 2005, 11:06 PM
Eclipse...

scottish144
December 17th, 2005, 11:23 PM
JGRASP for Java and C++.

EnGee
December 18th, 2005, 07:35 AM
Take the intelliJ editor, Netbeans GUI designer, JBuilder (or JDeveloper) speed, Together UML, Sun creator web development and fill the rest with eclipse plugins and look and feel. This is my favorite IDE for Java :)

handy
December 20th, 2005, 04:21 PM
I loved CanDo, on the Amiga.

Moved to windoze, looked for CanDo replacement, no CanDo? Purchased fresh release of VB6Pro, threw it away in disgust :(

Make living out of helping people with windoze, (who always have problems) thankfully Ubuntu community is helping me love computers again.

Currently exploring Python with Eric.
Looks promising :)

Cheers,

handy

Iandefor
December 21st, 2005, 10:17 PM
Bah! Who needs a GUI when you have VI and GCC? jk

kudu
December 21st, 2005, 10:54 PM
I like gedit!

d0nk
December 23rd, 2005, 04:55 AM
My IDE of choice is Eclipse. Hands down, its full featured for Java, and plugins allow it to be used for almost any languge. My two mostly used languges are Java and PHP, so PHPeclipse and Eclipse are perfect for my needs.

When i don't have an x session (ssh'ed from school), i use Vim.

pharcyde
December 31st, 2005, 10:35 AM
gvim/vi. I find that I try to use the vi shortcuts when I switch back over to another IDE. I've also tried out Kate and various windows IDE, but exclusively work with vim for all platforms I work with now.

dmsynck
January 1st, 2006, 10:04 PM
My favorite IDE?

GVim
Bash shell
Python interpreter

Adrian
January 2nd, 2006, 12:31 PM
What's your favorite IDE for development? Personally, I use jedit for PHP web development at work and for PHP and Python development at home, and vim for C/C++. Jedit is a modular JRE based IDE that supports numerous useful plugins. Vim... well, vim is just vim. ;)
dataw0lf

KDevelop. It's really nice, flexible and powerful. I'm using KDE at the moment, but it works nicely in Gnome too.

zambizzi
January 2nd, 2006, 08:20 PM
Netbeans, Netbeans, Netbeans

5.0 is frickin' fabulous. :KS

healychan
January 4th, 2006, 09:46 AM
There is a new IDE call geany. It is a light weight IDE but I love it because it is sample:p

you can download form here
http://geany.uvena.de/

Jungles
January 4th, 2006, 10:47 AM
Linux/Unix: Eclipse 3.1.1 (I use it for Java only, though.)

But under Windows, MS Visual Studio 2005 has no rival. Well, there are plenty of rivals, but none of them come even close to the power of VS2005 for medium to large industrial-strength projects. The only drawback is the restriction to MS-supported languages (C++.NET, C#, J#, ASP.NET, VB.NET).

For others, I use a plain text editor.

Haegin
January 4th, 2006, 06:38 PM
There is a new IDE call geany. It is a light weight IDE but I love it because it is sample:p

you can download form here
http://geany.uvena.de/

Which package did you download? I tried the .tar.bz2 to compile it but it couldn't find gtk+-2.0 as it is called gtk2 on ubuntu (as far as I can tell) - does this mean I have to edit something or link something?

Regards,

healychan
January 6th, 2006, 09:30 PM
Which package did you download? I tried the .tar.bz2 to compile it but it couldn't find gtk+-2.0 as it is called gtk2 on ubuntu (as far as I can tell) - does this mean I have to edit something or link something?

Regards,

First, add this to your /etc/apt/source.list
deb http://debian.uvena.de/ ./stable/

Then go to the Synaptic Package Manager. Reload the database. Search for geany and install it.
There you are!!!!!!!!;)

Jungles
January 6th, 2006, 11:55 PM
Yesterday, I downloaded Netbeans 5.0 beta2. Last time I tried Netbeans was during its 3.x/4.0beta era. The package is so much more responsive now, and seemingly less cluttered than before.

I used to use Eclipse because of its speed and feature set. But now that I've tried Netbeans 5, those two factors are null and void. In fact, Netbeans 5 seems slightly faster than Eclipse (startup time and code-completion response are definitely quicker). I've switched to Netbeans now.

Fawad
January 7th, 2006, 07:07 PM
In Linux, I use gedit or vim and in Windows I use Visual Studio.

Gibbz
January 8th, 2006, 10:46 AM
hrmm i've tried:
kdevelop,
anjuta,
code::blocks
mingw studio

code blocks was good, but couldnt get debugging working, and multiple projects didnt work to well.

mingw studio was good, but this had its own problems i forget :-/

kdevelop, does this allow multiple projects? currently trying it out

anjuta, cant find any support for multiple projects....

must have multiple projects!!!!! know of any ide's which might suite me?

Norberg
January 8th, 2006, 11:14 AM
I use gedit when programming PHP, Python and Bash and I use anjuta for c++

tmahmood
January 8th, 2006, 12:42 PM
in Windows
Visual Studio 2003 for C++, C# its the best IDE(this is only a personal opinion so don't flame me)
BlueJ for Java. great IDE for Java.JUST ROCKS :D. though it don't have anything like auto complete features. but its just great for Java programming.

in Linux
I can't find any good IDE for Linux :(
right now I am using CodeBlocks. so so
still trying to make Anjuta work(its asks for glib but i can't find it anywhere :confused:)
KDevelop is for KDE so not using it.
gedit, Vi, EMacs is editor NOT IDE so i use them for viewing files only
and BlueJ for Java :D

Thirsteh
January 8th, 2006, 02:25 PM
emacs!!!!!

Azriphale
January 8th, 2006, 02:44 PM
These days I mostly use emacs. I used to use KDevelop, and as far as that style of IDE goes, I would say it is the best. For my cross-platform stuff, I use code::blocks in windows, but it just complicates Linux development so much, so its emacs in Linux. I still need to learn Gnu Autotools properly tho...

I also used to use vim, but after using emacs for a while, I think its more friendly and powerful.

Ubuntu Warrior
January 9th, 2006, 12:15 AM
Eclipse is excellent for Java and C++ stuff. Integrates well with Tomcat/Apache, Hibernate, Acegi and Spring which is all important to our web development strategy.

Takeshi Miya
January 14th, 2006, 09:50 PM
Code::Blocks is just the C/C++ IDE I have been searching for years.
Cross-platform programming (currently runs in Linux/Windows/*BSD) is the best for me. It's lightweight yet very powerfull.

Not only it's multi-platform, but also multi-compiler (currently it supports GCC, MinGW, Intel Compiler, Digital Mars, OpenWatcom, Microsoft Free Compiler 2003 & 2005, Borland Compiler).

It supports debugging and codecompletion, among a lot of other features.

Takeshi Miya
January 14th, 2006, 09:53 PM
hrmm i've tried:
code blocks was good, but couldnt get debugging working, and multiple projects didnt work to well.

Just try the Code::Blocks SVN development version, it features a rewritten support for GDB, and now supports also Inter-project dependencies, among zillion bugfixes. ;)

rwilmink
January 14th, 2006, 11:39 PM
So far I have used Microsoft Visual Studio doing C++, but I have never programmed in Linux.
Say I want to write a C(++) X-program that runs in Gnome, what IDE would be best?

Takeshi Miya
January 15th, 2006, 01:06 AM
So far I have used Microsoft Visual Studio doing C++, but I have never programmed in Linux.
Say I want to write a C(++) X-program that runs in Gnome, what IDE would be best?

So far, I would say Code::Blocks (http://codeblocks.org/) because it can imports: MSVC6, MSVC 2003/2005, and DevC++ projects,

As for the GUI toolkit, as you've said C++, GTK is in plain C (anyways I don't like programming for it), so that's discarded.
QT is another option (C++), but you've said Gnome, and QT programs doesn't looks so nice on Gnome desktops.

The last option (and best IMHO) is wxWidgets (http://wxwidgets.org/) (C++). It renders using GTK2 on Linux (or GTK1, or Motif, or X11, etc. you choose).
So it will look very integrated in Gnome desktop.

But perhaps more important, is that not only it's cross-platform, it uses native widgets on any platform it runs (Linux, BSD, Mac OS X, Windows, etc).

Alpha_toxic
January 15th, 2006, 02:52 AM
Best IDE I've used? Free Pascal for win32 :) I really have good memories about those times...
For Java - Eclipse is just great.

btw can someone tell me wich packages I should install on a fresh Kubuntu install to get Kdevelop working. I tried it a few days ago, but it wouldn't compile a "Hello World!". I'm clearly mising sth, but haven't got time to hunt it down.

Crazy Man
January 15th, 2006, 11:18 PM
gvim >_>

Sure it has IDE-ish options:
<esc>:!<compile options> && <execute program>
for example

:!g++ test.cpp -o test && ./test

Plus, they have some of the best color schemes and syntax highlighting support I've ever seen.

Having said that, there's still room to dabble in Dev-C++/MSVC/JCreator etc (in Windows)...and codeblocks, maybe. >_>

Adrian
January 15th, 2006, 11:27 PM
So far I have used Microsoft Visual Studio doing C++, but I have never programmed in Linux.
Say I want to write a C(++) X-program that runs in Gnome, what IDE would be best?

Both KDevelop and Anjuta will work for C++ programming in Gnome. I prefer KDevelop (even in Gnome), but other people prefer Anjuta which is a native Gnome application. Try them both and see for yourself!

Gibbz
January 18th, 2006, 08:15 AM
Just try the Code::Blocks SVN development version, it features a rewritten support for GDB, and now supports also Inter-project dependencies, among zillion bugfixes. ;)

Only problem is svn is a b**** to get running :|

Takeshi Miya
January 19th, 2006, 08:02 AM
Only problem is svn is a b**** to get running :|
Why do you say that?
It's very straightforward.


sudo apt-get install subversion
svn checkout svn://svn.berlios.de/codeblocks/trunk

and then the usual:

./bootstrap
./configure
make
sudo make install

kassetra
January 19th, 2006, 08:16 AM
Well, for my second love - Ruby - I use RadRails and FreeRIDE (although, not currently as I have upgraded my FOX toolkit past the abilities of the current FreeRIDE versions.) Of course, I also modified both FOX and FreeRIDE in order for them both to have a nicer appearance/widget set when running in my Gnome sessions. RadRails... is pure heaven to work with for my Ruby on Rails stuff.

For X/HTML, XML, PHP, and CSS ... I actually use a combination of three tools, depending on what I need to do: Bluefish (Bluefish is based on the pre-macromedia Homesite, which I had used since Version 1 - really loved it,) CSSed, and MlView. Screem and NVu annoyed me to the point I could not use them but Peacock is lovely to use when I just need to do a little fixing.

In a pinch, I'll use vi on the server or vim locally to edit my files.

brj
January 19th, 2006, 08:28 AM
hi,

i use eclipse for java development.

jakob

rwilmink
January 24th, 2006, 01:27 AM
So far, I would say Code::Blocks (http://codeblocks.org/) because it can imports: MSVC6, MSVC 2003/2005, and DevC++ projects,

As for the GUI toolkit, as you've said C++, GTK is in plain C (anyways I don't like programming for it), so that's discarded.
QT is another option (C++), but you've said Gnome, and QT programs doesn't looks so nice on Gnome desktops.

The last option (and best IMHO) is wxWidgets (http://wxwidgets.org/) (C++). It renders using GTK2 on Linux (or GTK1, or Motif, or X11, etc. you choose).
So it will look very integrated in Gnome desktop.

But perhaps more important, is that not only it's cross-platform, it uses native widgets on any platform it runs (Linux, BSD, Mac OS X, Windows, etc).

Thanks, I looked up wxwidgets, and I will certainly try it!!

Gr Ronald

ardchoille
January 24th, 2006, 02:09 AM
My favourite is vim.

krypto_wizard
January 25th, 2006, 11:08 PM
VI is the best...isn't it ?

My favourite is vim.

Sprutnik
January 26th, 2006, 08:56 PM
Eclipse for the win :)

Jacky_J
January 27th, 2006, 07:41 PM
KDevelop 3.2.3 and Quanta 3.4.3 in a GNOME environment.
The only reason I don't use Anjuta is because it's missing the feature of automatically compiling outdated code when hitting the "run" button. Sounds stupid but it annoys me.

kvorion
January 27th, 2006, 08:58 PM
I have been using anjuta for a while and I like it. Have used KDevelop but I still continue with Anjuta

dancavs
January 29th, 2006, 04:56 PM
hi

im new to linux just installed ubuntu 2 weeks ago and im never going back. i was wondering if someone could recomend an ide for c++/opengl programming for the gnome desktop? im new to graphics programming - the unit ill be studying (intro to games programming) uses MS visual studio - ive got XP and visual studio installed on another pc but i want to get programming in linux asap.

so far after reading these posts im leaning towards eclipse or anjuta but as noone so far has really mentioned opengl i thought i would ask about it specifically...

cheers

deavik
January 29th, 2006, 06:16 PM
hi

im new to linux just installed ubuntu 2 weeks ago and im never going back. i was wondering if someone could recomend an ide for c++/opengl programming for the gnome desktop? im new to graphics programming - the unit ill be studying (intro to games programming) uses MS visual studio - ive got XP and visual studio installed on another pc but i want to get programming in linux asap.

so far after reading these posts im leaning towards eclipse or anjuta but as noone so far has really mentioned opengl i thought i would ask about it specifically...

cheers
Hi, I am new to Ubuntu too, and loving it just as you are :) ... About your question, I don't think you need to make a OGL specific IDE choice. I am using Code::Blocks right now (because I used to use it in Windows) and it's doing about OK (running a bit slow, though, I'm thinking of bugging their developers a bit), and I think any other IDE will be good too.

Might I just point out, that you'll have a lot more fun with OGL on Linux than you did under Windows :D So far I have had to do no extension loading, and as a side bonus gcc works lightning fast.

Have a good time with Ubuntu!

dancavs
January 31st, 2006, 05:54 AM
cheers for your reply deavik :)

i finally got my first opengl/c program to compile and run \\:D/ using the terminal and mucking around with makefiles (a language unto themselves). it took time to figure out the what and how behind installing the required packages (mesa, freeglut etc) so for now im going to stick with compiling from the terminal and coding from gedit until i have a better grasp of using makefiles.

btw my fav ide in windows is jbuilder

geekphreak
January 31st, 2006, 06:23 AM
Eclipse & SharpDevelop

ZylGadis
February 2nd, 2006, 07:41 PM
used to be SciTE, now NetBeans

Crazy Man
February 2nd, 2006, 09:22 PM
Why the hell would you go backwards like that? :p

ZylGadis
February 2nd, 2006, 10:23 PM
When was the last time you used NetBeans? :)
SciTE is wonderful, no doubt, but as I get older I come to appreciate the one-click build of advanced IDEs, etc. It is very true that 99% of the people who use advanced IDEs actually spoil themselves to the brink of stupidity, because the only thing they ever learn is click buttons. I am proud to consider myself a part of the 1% who know what actually happens at the lower levels, but are just too lazy (too clever?) to do it manually every time.

Crazy Man
February 2nd, 2006, 10:42 PM
What's wrong with Code::Blocks?

Freddie
February 4th, 2006, 12:23 AM
I use a fair few IDE's, but am slowly trying to migrate all of my projects to Xcode (OS X I know) as it is by far the best IDE that I have ever used in my life (code completion, project management the lot). When working on open source platforms I use Eclipse for Java, Mono Develop for C# and KDevelop (which I am not a huge fan on) for C/C++.

SuperMike
February 4th, 2006, 05:16 AM
I used to like Screem, but I got aggravated by not being able to turn off the &gt; &lt; that get inserted on me when I want to type < and >. I also greatly disliked the fact that I could not turn off the popdown listbox every time I typed something that sort of looked like HTML. The developer didn't seem to be interested in fixing this, so I have bailed and return to Bluefish. Luckily for me the Bluefish that ships with Breezy is pretty bug free and has new features that make it work for me exactly except I normally have to type CTRL+T when editing a new page I open so that I turn off automatic closing tags.

I did try Geany for a bit, and it is fascinating and just right for me in certain ways, but the problem I cannot stand is the way the left pane file window is implemented. I posted a forum msg on Sourceforge for the developer and he said that he will never make the left pane window more like the way Bluefish and most other IDEs work. Don't know why he said that, but that's what he said.

I like Nvu for doing WSYIWYG template work for HTML, but was disappointed to find that it doesn't seem to have a clue about background images on stuff. So, if I need that, I have to open FrontPage Express under WINE.

gerbman
February 4th, 2006, 06:44 AM
Can't beat good ol' emacs tho!

Word.