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Peter1234123
January 20th, 2008, 06:43 PM
I know it's legal, but I was wondering if I would be..discouraged from doing this: arranging a protest against DRM, outside of a computer store, most likely Best buy, and distributing Ubuntu to shoppers in Best Buy, it would be legally done; I'd get a permit, but, would I be..discouraged from doing this by the Ubuntu community?

smartboyathome
January 20th, 2008, 06:48 PM
It might make Ubuntu users look anti-microsoft (some are, some aren't), but it probably won't get many people interested in my opinion. Also, this should be in the Community Cafe.

Namtabmai
January 20th, 2008, 07:04 PM
Depends on how you do it really. I know of several people who've just gone into the public and given away Ubuntu cds so they could make people more aware of the alternatives.

http://mooney.wibbleh.com/index.php?entry=entry070916-182249

*note* Not my blog, more of a friend or a friends blog.

I think as long as your polite and friendly then everything should be o.k. Just remember you're not there to slag off Microsoft, you'll be doing this to make people aware of the alternatives. For some Linux/Ubuntu isn't the right choice, for others they probably don't even realise there is a choice.

fatality_uk
January 20th, 2008, 07:08 PM
It might make Ubuntu users look anti-microsoft (some are, some aren't), but it probably won't get many people interested in my opinion. Also, this should be in the Community Cafe.

I'd have to agree smartboyathome. The likely response will be "D.R what?" Most people wont be aware of what the situation is as they just either play cd/dvd's. Perhaps a leafleting campaign explaning what DRM is and why you think it needs to be addressed.

Also, try not to fix it on one store. BestBuy! Why them? Sony headquarters maybe, but a retailer I don't think (assuming that's what bestbuy is) isn't pushing for DRM I am sure

az
January 20th, 2008, 07:09 PM
This is the community you would want to get in touch with.
http://defectivebydesign.org/

Not that the Ubuntu community is not anti-DRM, just use the right tool for the right job.

Peyton
January 20th, 2008, 07:31 PM
You're going to need Best Buy's permission.

LO Matt
January 20th, 2008, 08:24 PM
It's a little ironic that you'd pick Best Buy, while it is probably one of the biggest distributors of DRM free music (a.k.a CDs) . . . not counting P2P, of course. :razz:

I can't believe I just defended best buy. Their use of CDs as a loss leader to get people to buy friggin plasma screens pretty much killed independent record stores. A little off topic . . .

Xbehave
January 20th, 2008, 09:11 PM
I for 1 think drm is a good thing. like most technology its dual use, but i don't see how to allow only movie rentals without it, or allow downloading of content that you don't own the copyright for (iPlayer)

I hate the reactionism that drm is evil, i think linux could be a real good platform for drm ,as security on linux is by design, the program can check for hacks on the system, then report back to a server before releasing the keys to decrypt the file.

maniacmusician
January 20th, 2008, 11:05 PM
I for 1 think drm is a good thing. like most technology its dual use, but i don't see how to allow only movie rentals without it, or allow downloading of content that you don't own the copyright for (iPlayer)

I hate the reactionism that drm is evil, i think linux could be a real good platform for drm ,as security on linux is by design, the program can check for hacks on the system, then report back to a server before releasing the keys to decrypt the file.
DRM is pretty inconsequential at this point in time. As the world is moving to high bandwidth platforms, rentals are really going to move to an internet-based platform (streaming). Also, just because DRM is circumvented, it doesn't mean that retailers won't make any money. We cracked the DVD standard a long time ago, yet DVD rental services are still getting a lot of business.

DRM strikes me as a sort of unnecessary measure. It leaves the end-users feeling like they have no control over their content (services like iTunes), whereas big corporations can abuse the power they gain from DRM (BMG-Sony) and the closed, proprietary, and intensely competitive nature of DRM can even cause conflicts between different kind of DRM'd files on your computer (the recent Netflix fiasco illustrates this).

You also mentioned copyrights; a large chunk of piracy is a sort of reactionary movement to the archaic and unreasonable copyright laws that currently exist. I mean, it's obviously a very complicated situation, but I think a lot of people are in a situation right now where supporting DRM would ultimately go against their ideals.

zipperback
January 20th, 2008, 11:14 PM
I know it's legal, but I was wondering if I would be..discouraged from doing this: arranging a protest against DRM, outside of a computer store, most likely Best buy, and distributing Ubuntu to shoppers in Best Buy, it would be legally done; I'd get a permit, but, would I be..discouraged from doing this by the Ubuntu community?


I think your protest is probably going to misunderstood by the general public, because your protest isn't against Best Buy or any specific store in this case, but rather DRM itself.

Perhaps your purposes would be better served if you talked to best buy and arranged to setup some sort of booth WITH their permission and blessing to give away information about DRM and perhaps make some flyers and such which present the actual facts about it and talk about how it actually affects the consumer and their rights.

The fact that you are protesting DRM is a totally different subject matter than wanting to attract attention to Ubuntu. And in my opinion it would be best served to not confuse the general public with the two.

- zipperback
:popcorn:

Methuselah
January 21st, 2008, 12:25 AM
My experience is that most people won't care about DRM until it bites them in the butt. I dunno, I find people to be sluggish in general when you're telling them anything that goes against the mainstream.

They are more likely to view you as crazy/alarmist than to even investigate what you're saying.They seem more likely to believe marketing/propoganda machines than plain facts. Most people seem to float about in a gelatin of collective thought; independent thinkers are rare and will be viewed with suspicion. History support this.

So, only independent thinkers who don't yet have all the facts will be aroused to action by any campaign highlighting Vista's wrongness. Anybody who willingly left the mainstream of desktop computing to use linux is probably an independent thinker and might feel everyone is the same way. Not so!

Therefore, I probably wouldn't go with a protest that might incite reflex antagonistic reactions. Probably, choosing a more neutral location (not directly in front of Best Buy) and handing out flyers with supportable FACTS might be effective if you wanted to do something.

Nano Geek
January 21st, 2008, 12:32 AM
I think it has been said before, but if you do it in front of a store, then you will need the store's manager's permission. Else you will probably asked to leave before you get started.

inversekinetix
January 21st, 2008, 01:20 AM
be careful, i know if some countries the 'right to assembly' can be used against people congregating for demonstrations.

Xbehave
January 21st, 2008, 03:14 AM
You also mentioned copyrights; a large chunk of piracy is a sort of reactionary movement to the archaic and unreasonable copyright laws that currently exist. I mean, it's obviously a very complicated situation, but I think a lot of people are in a situation right now where supporting DRM would ultimately go against their ideals.
the bbcs goal is to provide content to the uk to achive this goal it rents programs from other companies. In order to offer people the option to download the content, they have to use time limited drm (presumable so the people theyve rented the content from can still sell it to you). to server theyre goals they have to use drm

who sufers? linux users
why? because too many of us see stuff in good/bad not can/cant (*if only stalman had finished hurd and taken his idealists with him*)

forrestcupp
January 21st, 2008, 04:38 AM
I don't know if it's a worthy fight anyway. Just let it run its course. DRM is already becoming a thing of the past. All four of the big record companies are now offering their digital music DRM-free through Amazon and other places. I know that isn't the absolute end of DRM, but the industry is starting to see what a mistake it was, and they're reconsidering their tactics.

I really don't think that standing out in front of Best Buy is the way to go. When I see people doing things like that, I usually just think they're kooks or crooks and I don't pay them no mind. Just let it run it's course, and I think it will take care of itself.

Luggy
January 21st, 2008, 04:51 AM
This is the community you would want to get in touch with.
http://defectivebydesign.org/

Not that the Ubuntu community is not anti-DRM, just use the right tool for the right job.

Absolutely spot on.

Æniad
January 21st, 2008, 05:46 AM
DRM is dying off and even if it weren't your demonstrating in front of a store will not accomplish anything what so ever (except for make you look like a tool).