PDA

View Full Version : one laptop per child, intel is gone



LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 01:01 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080104/ap_on_hi_te/intel_one_laptop_per_child

Dixon Bainbridge
January 4th, 2008, 01:43 PM
Intel really are pathetic. Glad I didn't buy their CPU's last time I upgraded. Don't care about the performance hit from running AMD, happy not to give that company any more of my cash. Don't have any respect for a company that can't put aside its business interests over those of the needs of the developing world.

Nunu
January 4th, 2008, 01:47 PM
SO now will AMD have a go at making good on intels broken promises?

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 01:51 PM
Intel really are pathetic. Glad I didn't buy their CPU's last time I upgraded. Don't care about the performance hit from running AMD, happy not to give that company any more of my cash. Don't have any respect for a company that can't put aside its business interests over those of the needs of the developing world.

Actually, Intel is making a computer with the same market as the one laptop project. I think the main problem is that the one laptop per child people didn't want Intel to use the processor in other computers. If that is the case, I fully support Intel.

daverich
January 4th, 2008, 01:57 PM
yeah I agree.

looks like OLPC were making an impossible demand.

Kind regards

Dave Rich

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 01:58 PM
yeah I agree.

looks like OLPC were making an impossible demand.

Kind regards

Dave Rich

I don't understand why they would make that demand. Intel is working on a project similiar to the OLPC, so it should actually help the user base. Competition is good.

Johnsie
January 4th, 2008, 02:05 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7171201.stm

After reading the bbc report I've lost all respect for the OLPC people. What makes them think they should be the only company providing laptops for poor people??????? That's either pure arrogance or they are trying to get a monopoly.

Intel have always produced equipment for a large number of projects, companies and systems. It's a complete joke that a small group like OLPC would make restrictive demands on a major chip producer like Intel. OLPC can go and get stuffed if that's the way they want to do business. We gave them alot of repsect because they were promoting Linux, but I'd prefer that we not take advantage of poor people to promote Linux.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 02:06 PM
http://www.intel.com/intel/worldahead/classmatepc/

http://www.classmatepc.com/


There is the Intel Classmate, looks pretty good.

wolfear
January 4th, 2008, 02:15 PM
The article is pretty much just FUD.

I really fail to see how Intel leaving is "dealing a big blow to the ambitious project" because the XO uses AMD and the Classmate is a Microsoft project,


Intel believed all along that there is a need for multiple alternatives

Intel and MS have both been whining about the OLPC from the start,
The Classmate was a feeble attempt to steal market share from a project which uses a Red Hat Linux based operating system.

Which is sad because the OLPC isn't about market share, something that seems to be beyond the comprehension of companies like Intel and Microsoft.

If I remember correctly, the OLPC did add the expansion capacity needed by Microsoft into the XO and basically told MS they were on their own to make it work.

kevdog
January 4th, 2008, 02:16 PM
OLPC is turning into a joke. Hard to predict if the product will ever be delivered.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 02:17 PM
OLPC is turning into a joke. Hard to predict if the product will ever be delivered.

Noble idea though.

I really don't care who makes it, just as long as it is.

Dixon Bainbridge
January 4th, 2008, 02:59 PM
Actually, Intel is making a computer with the same market as the one laptop project. I think the main problem is that the one laptop per child people didn't want Intel to use the processor in other computers. If that is the case, I fully support Intel.

Sorry, don't buy it. Why the need for Intel to develop their own laptop? Its all about business, or future business interests and nothing to do helping the developed world. Microsoft were making noises too about hijacking this whole thing too. The whole project has been undermined by sniping and big business getting pissy about who runs what. Intel didnt need to put chips into the laptop, they could have just stumped up some cash instead and got behind the project. The developed world doesn't need loads of tech companies bickering over who does what and how. It needs help.

So sorry, Intel and MS have done all they can to undermine this, simple because they weren't right in the middle developing the chips and the OS.

Absolutely pathetic.

bufsabre666
January 4th, 2008, 03:03 PM
this isnt a cheap laptop this is a program for education of children and these people are making a mockery of it, its pathedic

Johnsie
January 4th, 2008, 03:03 PM
Maybe now we can concentrate more on providing them with clean water instead of shoving Linux down their throats.

Dixon Bainbridge
January 4th, 2008, 03:09 PM
Maybe now we can concentrate more on providing them with clean water instead of shoving Linux down their throats.

Wrong attitude. These are important educational tools. They are not instead of food aid etc, they are an addition too. What would benefit Africa the most, however, is if the west would stop screwing them over, but that will never happen.

Africa nations dont want to be dependent on the west, we make them dependent on us.

popch
January 4th, 2008, 03:28 PM
Maybe now we can concentrate more on providing them with clean water instead of shoving Linux down their throats.

What? Intel already has enough clean water, and they're selling their school 'computing solution' with Linux, too, if you want it. Anyway, what's got water to do with it? Because they call their school pc a 'solution'?

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 05:32 PM
Maybe now we can concentrate more on providing them with clean water instead of shoving Linux down their throats.

Education is vital for any sort of improvement in a society. Intel and others are in the computer business, they are doing what they do best. It would make little sense to have Intel supply water filters and have someone else provide the educational devices.

UbLnoy
January 4th, 2008, 06:50 PM
"Maybe now we can concentrate more on providing them with clean water instead of shoving Linux down their throats."

Why not do both? Clean water is a good thing, and Education is a
good thing.

Why would anyone pay a hundred dollars more, when they could have
a machine that was designed from the ground up for the purpose?
Special screen (daylight usable), everything as low power usage as possible, water resistant, sealed against dust, flash instead of hard
disk (no moving parts), several options to recharge, the display turns around and lays flat to act like a tablet reader, and the mesh networking system that allows users to link their machines together to reach farther (only one machine has to have an internet connection, and all the machines in the mesh can connect.)

Think maybe it has something to do with the fact that the three hundred
dollar machine runs windowsCE??

Kernel Sanders
January 4th, 2008, 07:37 PM
IMHO, the Classmate PC is better than the OLPC

Shame it runs Windows though :(

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:06 PM
Shame it runs Windows though :(

Nothing is forever :)

CCNA_student
January 4th, 2008, 09:11 PM
Johnsie is right, why are we focusing on giving poor and destitute people computers when things like say food, clean water, and some basic sanitation are far more important? What good is a laptop to someone who has dysentery from dirty water. Could someone please explain this?

Sin Cere,

CCNA

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:13 PM
Are these kids going to be able to eat these laptops? Another example of putting last things first.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:16 PM
Johnsie is right, why are we focusing on giving poor and destitute people computers when things like say food, clean water, and some basic sanitation are far more important? What good is a laptop to someone who has dysentery from dirty water. Could someone please explain this?

Sin Cere,

CCNA

Food and shelter are needed, and are provided. These laptops are not being dropped from airplanes into desolate areas. The remote schools need to be able to use modern technology and need it at a low price. The low priced and resilient laptops in the works are great for this.

Education is needed if these kids are to have a future.

CCNA_student
January 4th, 2008, 09:18 PM
Wouldn't books be better then? These laptops will last no more than a decade, but a book can last for thousands of years.

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:22 PM
I say bring developing children along at speed, if they are living in the 10th century lets get them up to speed on the 11th, etc, before we put them in the 21st.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:25 PM
I say bring developing children along at speed, if they are living in the 10th century lets get them up to speed on the 11th, etc, before we put them in the 21st.

They are not behind like that!

People have a tendency to think they are in some way superior to past generations. They didn't have the ability to have what we have, humanity built off of past work and that is how we get to where we are.

They are the same as poor children in modern cities in shoddy schools. They need materials, and since in some areas such poverty is rampant, they need help on a larger scale.

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:29 PM
Some are. These laptops in the wrong hands can be very dangerous. It's the equivilent of giving a gun to someone that has no training in how and when to use one.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:30 PM
Some are. These laptops in the wrong hands can be very dangerous. It's the equivilent of giving a gun to someone that has no training in how and when to use one.

How is providing schools in poorer areas of the world dangerous? They are provided condoms, food, soldiers and generators.

CCNA_student
January 4th, 2008, 09:33 PM
Again, wouldn't books be better? A book is far more durable than a laptop, and it requires no electricity obviously enough.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:35 PM
Again, wouldn't books be better? A book is far more durable than a laptop, and it requires no electricity obviously enough.

Perhaps they have books?

I don't think people understand the situation.

Laptops are not being dropped into the hands of primative tribes.

What books would you suggest? One, two, three? Or perhaps the ability to connect to the internet....

A library would be a great gift, but is not practicle. A single set of books would be an insult.

swoll1980
January 4th, 2008, 09:36 PM
Who cares!! Children all over the world are starving and dieing. I think having a Computer is the least of the worlds problems. I live in the states and work full time and didn't get my first computer till last year and I'm 28 years old. Maybe that money could be used for somthing more important.

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:37 PM
It would be dangerous because knowledge is power and power (knowledge) in the wrong hands can be used in very destructive ways. I think the idea is good. I just hope that giving these laptops out is done in a responsible fashion and not just under the assumption that they will all benefit from them as will all of society everywhere.

Even food delivered to parts of Africa is intercepted by those with bad intentions and the good people don't get it. In that respect you first need to ensure that the food gets in the right hands for the right use. The same is true here with laptops, lets make sure they get in the right hands and for the right use rather than just giving them out to whomever just because they don't have one.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:38 PM
Who cares!! Children all over the world are starving and dieing. I think having a Computer is the least of the worlds problems. I live in the states and work full time and didn't get my first computer till last year and I'm 28 years old. Maybe that money could be used for somthing more impotant.

It isn't meant to solve the worlds problems! It is an affordable laptop to enable poorer localities to be able to benifit from computers.

Why did you waste money on your computer? Don't you know that money could have been used to help someone else? Companies can do whatever they want with their money, just like you.

az
January 4th, 2008, 09:38 PM
Are these kids going to be able to eat these laptops? Another example of putting last things first.


http://wiki.laptop.org/go/OLPC_myths


You're forcing this on poverty stricken areas that need food, water and housing rather than a laptop.

False: Not at all. Like it was said earlier, this is only a tool and should not be seen as more than that. We agree that other more urgent matters must be attended to before you insert high tech into the situation of poverty.

Not everybody agrees with that idea. Some think that access to the Net is the fastest way for poor people to get the political clout to require their governments to provide services to them. Or to get the education for real jobs that take them out of poverty completely. Or access to innovative technologies for providing food, water, clothing, shelter, energy, etc.

But we believe education and communication with the modern world to be important as well. Food, water, clothing and other necessities come first. Nevertheless, a world view and good education can do wonders for a child's mind and continued health. Computers, especially those that are networked, have shown to be development 'multipliers', that is they help to improve the delivery of medical, educational and communication services.



Wouldn't books be better then? These laptops will last no more than a decade, but a book can last for thousands of years.

But books can get outdated very fast. As well, the XO is not just one book, but it can be whole library. It can be a whole school, too, if physically getting to your school is too dangerous. That's one of the reasons they come with a webcam.

So there is a lot more potential in the XO than the equivalent cost of textbooks.

LaRoza
January 4th, 2008, 09:39 PM
It would be dangerous because knowledge is power and power (knowledge) in the wrong hands can be used in very destructive ways. I think the idea is good. I just hope that giving these laptops out is done in a responsible fashion and not just under the assumption that they will all benefit from them as will all of society everywhere.

Even food delivered to parts of Africa is intercepted by those with bad intentions and the good people don't get it. In that respect you first need to ensure that the food gets in the right hands for the right use. The same is true here with laptops, lets make sure they get in the right hands and for the right use rather than just giving them out to whomever just because they don't have one.

It has been found that education reduces poverty and serious ailments.

Shall we keep them dumb?

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:42 PM
It has been found that education reduces poverty and serious ailments.

Shall we keep them dumb?


No, we should make sure these laptops are used for the purposes they are intended for, not just assume they will be.

popch
January 4th, 2008, 09:47 PM
No, we should make sure these laptops are used for the purposes they are intended for, not just assume they will be.

Sorry, but why should 'we' make sure these laptops are used for any purpose whatsoever, when 'we' do not pay for those laptops?

They are to be bought by governments or comparable institutions for use in their schools.

Go tell those governments that their pupils need more water and books than laptops. While you're at it, tell them where to build more bridges and roads, too.

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:48 PM
The idea is great. It's the application of the idea I worry about. Who's going to decide where these laptops go? How are you going to keep these laptops away from adults that want to use them for unethical purposes? A child can't keep an adult from taking it from them. It's not the child using them that worries me. It's that they fall into the wrong hands that worries me and I have heard nothing on how that is to be avoided or even mitigated.

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 09:52 PM
Sorry, but why should 'we' make sure these laptops are used for any purpose whatsoever, when 'we' do not pay for those laptops?

They are to be bought by governments or comparable institutions for use in their schools.

Go tell those governments that their pupils need more water and books than laptops. While you're at it, tell them where to build more bridges and roads, too.


I misspoke, by "We" I mean those giving out the laptops.

CCNA_student
January 4th, 2008, 10:03 PM
"But books can get outdated very fast. As well, the XO is not just one book, but it can be whole library. It can be a whole school, too, if physically getting to your school is too dangerous. That's one of the reasons they come with a webcam."

Who exactly is going to pay for the internet connections? How will can they connect to the internet when there is very little infrastructure? How is someone in a remote village going to connect to the internet. Or a place where the phone service is not even reliable or exists? And books can be cheap, it just depends upon what you buy. And again, books last longer. The laws of physics, or the basic grammar in a language does not change on a day to day basis. The books that become outdated quickly are the ones about computers anyway, so books would be a good investment.

popch
January 4th, 2008, 10:19 PM
Who exactly is going to pay for the internet connections? How will can they connect to the internet when there is very little infrastructure? How is someone in a remote village going to connect to the internet. Or a place where the phone service is not even reliable or exists? The laws of physics, or the basic grammar in a language does not change on a day to day basis. The books that become outdated quickly are the ones about computers anyway, so books would be a good investment.

Oh dear. Let's take this in order:

Who exactly is going to pay for the internet connections? How will can they connect to the internet when there is very little infrastructure

The school pays the internet connection. The XO introduces a very sophisticated wireless LAN over which a largish number of laptops can connect to a stationary internet connection 'somewhere' in or near the school.

How is someone in a remote village going to connect to the internet. Or a place where the phone service is not even reliable or exists?

Since it's the government or the school which buys the laptops, they are bound to find out if there is any connection possible.

And books can be cheap, it just depends upon what you buy. And again, books last longer.

What you buy. Quite. Which book would you buy for the needs of a school? See spot run? How many of those? One per school or one per room?

The laws of physics, or the basic grammar in a language does not change on a day to day basis. The books that become outdated quickly are the ones about computers anyway, so books would be a good investment

Again: how many book titles and copies per school would you propose? What about economics, agriculture, maths, low-cost low-energy engineering? The half life of those topics can be in the vicinity of a year. And have you looked at prices for reference books lately?

Books would not be a good investment.

Sporkman
January 4th, 2008, 10:19 PM
Interview w/ Negroponte re Intel's pullout:

http://money.cnn.com/2008/01/04/technology/kirkpatrick_negroponte.fortune/index.htm?source=yahoo_quote

zuzuzzzip
January 4th, 2008, 10:29 PM
I think the educational systems where they are to be implemented already have books.

Everyone here seems to have no idea of what's going on in Africa. (I'm not calling myself an expert or anything... )
But you guys keep bringing up food and water, those are other regions. Did you know Africa also has BIG cities? (i.e. Windhoek)

The poor region's is the fault of the government, but the government has no money and as I see it (and as someone else said earlier), this is our (the western world's) fault! If every country spared a 1000 /$ these people could be realy helped.

But that's a bit off topic actually :P

evil316
January 4th, 2008, 10:31 PM
I think the educational systems where they are to be implemented already have books.

Everyone here seems to have no idea of what's going on in Africa. (I'm not calling myself an expert or anything... )
But you guys keep bringing up food and water, those are other regions. Did you know Africa also has BIG cities? (i.e. Windhoek)

The poor region's is the fault of the government, but the government has no money and as I see it (and as someone else said earlier), this is our (the western world's) fault! If every country spared a 1000 /$ these people could be realy helped.

But that's a bit off topic actually :P

Sure, throw money at the problem, that'll solve it.

zuzuzzzip
January 4th, 2008, 10:33 PM
Sure, throw money at the problem, that'll solve it.

No you're right it wont, it's in their hands but hey it could help

swoll1980
January 4th, 2008, 10:37 PM
It isn't meant to solve the worlds problems! It is an affordable laptop to enable poorer localities to be able to benifit from computers.

Why did you waste money on your computer? Don't you know that money could have been used to help someone else? Companies can do whatever they want with their money, just like you.

I waisted money on my computer because I don't care enough about the situation to help fix it witch is my point.

swoll1980
January 4th, 2008, 10:38 PM
The US spends billions on humanitarian aid, and theres people here that don't have a place to live

saulgoode
January 4th, 2008, 10:51 PM
Oh dear. Let's take this in order:

Who exactly is going to pay for the internet connections? How will can they connect to the internet when there is very little infrastructure

The school pays the internet connection. The XO introduces a very sophisticated wireless LAN over which a largish number of laptops can connect to a stationary internet connection 'somewhere' in or near the school.

How is someone in a remote village going to connect to the internet. Or a place where the phone service is not even reliable or exists?

Since it's the government or the school which buys the laptops, they are bound to find out if there is any connection possible.

To elaborate on this, the XO computers will be linked together in a mesh network (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesh_network), whereby the computers will relay messages between each other, eventually reaching a (presumably larger) network server which will have Internet service (perhaps through a microwave transceiver in extremely remote locales). One of the more expensive components of the XO is a custom-designed network card which can handle this traffic while the computer itself is turned off (this is also, to my knowledge, the only hardware component for which the design is currently not openly available).


Books would not be a good investment.

Quoted for truth. :)

cheahk
January 4th, 2008, 10:52 PM
Who exactly is going to pay for the internet connections? How will can they connect to the internet when there is very little infrastructure? How is someone in a remote village going to connect to the internet. Or a place where the phone service is not even reliable or exists?

They use a meshed network to do this. Each OLPC is a node, and remains a node even when the main CPU is off.


http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Mesh_Network_Details (http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Mesh_Network_Details)

It's interesting to watch how this generation of OLPC children grow, and what their outlook on the life and world will be in a few years time. I think that is something that money can never buy.

-K

Dixon Bainbridge
January 4th, 2008, 11:20 PM
I'm actually gobsmacked at the level of ignorance in this thread.

Let's get one thing straight: these laptops are not a replacement for food and water. The two things ARE NOT RELATED. Its not an either/or situation here. Yes children are dying all over the world, but you can thank illegal financial practices and trade agreements, as well as dodgy western politics for 90% of that.

Secondly, the laptops are an ideal educational tool - flexible, durable, interactive and empowering. How is giving this tool to schoolchildren in poorer nations in any way bad or dangerous? Kids in the US and Europe have access to them readily enough, what makes them better qualified to use them? Why the hell shouldn't poor children access technology we all take for granted? One reason - it might mean poorer countries end up becoming more self sufficient and not under the thrall of the developed world. Well boo-hoo.

Can people stop bleating on about "wouldnt it be better to give them food/water/shelter..." It just makes you look really really dumb.

I work in the voluntary sector - I know this area inside out. What people from poorer backgrounds want is not endless handouts and pats on the head from those with money - they dont want charity, they want a chance to do things for themselves. Part of the solution to enable them to do that is access to technology and the benefits it brings that we take for granted here in the developed world. Education and access to technology is the key here.

popch
January 4th, 2008, 11:26 PM
I'm actually gobsmacked at the level of ignorance in this thread.. (emphasis is mine) - thank you for enhancing my vocabulary. I count this as my find for today.

swoll1980
January 4th, 2008, 11:27 PM
They are related they both cost money. Money that could be used for things that are more important than computers like the fact that more people in africa have aids than the rest of the world combined or that when the girls there get there pieriods they can't even go to school because they have no feminine hygene products. Maybe the money should be used for those problems instead thats all I'm saying

swoll1980
January 4th, 2008, 11:40 PM
It isn't meant to solve the worlds problems! It is an affordable laptop to enable poorer localities to be able to benifit from computers.

Why did you waste money on your computer? Don't you know that money could have been used to help someone else? Companies can do whatever they want with their money, just like you.

I'm not talkink about the companies I'm talking about the schools that are going to pay for them they have way to many problems tp worry about computers 20 years ago no one had computers yet the world managed to get along just fine with out them

kissoffboardy
January 5th, 2008, 12:11 AM
Actually,it DOES seem possible that having access to a computer isn't the gateway to knowledge that you would think. Judging by this thread there are definitely some people with PCs who have absolutely no idea about what is going on in other countries.

BreathEasy
January 5th, 2008, 12:24 AM
Actually,it DOES seem possible that having access to a computer isn't the gateway to knowledge that you would think. Judging by this thread there are definitely some people with PCs who have absolutely no idea about what is going on in other countries.
It is a gateway, you know this. The information is there - it's up to the person behind the computer to actually bother to educate themselves though.

I'm uncertain about the OLPC. I appreciate it's idealism, but everyone knows that idealism doesn't go far in the real world without practical solutions. We'll see how damaging the Intel business is later, but I'm still going to get a Core 2 Duo laptop soon because damnit, Intel make good chips.

kissoffboardy
January 5th, 2008, 12:41 AM
It is a gateway, you know this. The information is there - it's up to the person behind the computer to actually bother to educate themselves though.

I was being facetious. But anyway, without access it doesn't matter how lazy or motivated someone is.They can only bother to educate themselves if actually given an opportunity to do so, which is where projects like this come in.

Presto123
January 5th, 2008, 12:58 AM
No matter what it is, people will find ways to demonize it or point out how ludicrous it is.

kissoffboardy
January 5th, 2008, 01:04 AM
No matter what it is, people will find ways to demonize it or point out how ludicrous it is.

This is very sadly true. Personally I think it more ludicrous that people actually think "let them eat cake" is a valid argument against this worthy project.

wolfear
January 5th, 2008, 09:13 PM
Many people seem to conveniently overlooki the fact that there are dozens of humanitarian aid organizations that regularly give not only money but also tons of basic necessities to these countries and then have these supplies confiscated, resold on a black market or otherwise used for personal gain.

The OLPC was never intended as a relief organization, it's focus is on education, a totally separate endevor( and is only detrimental to those in power for whom having an educated populace is a threat).

How difficult is this to understand?
The OLPC wants to "teach a man to fish and feed him for lifetime" not "give him a fish and feed him for a day". There are plenty of others trying to do that.

Back on the original topic:
Those using Intel's disagreement for spead of FUD probably don't want us to read the flip side of this from Negropontef (http://money.cnn.com/2008/01/04/technology/kirkpatrick_negroponte.fortune/?postversion=2008010415)

Lucifiel
January 5th, 2008, 09:53 PM
Isn't this what a lot of monopolies do? Try to undermine the competition 'cos you've got the resources to do it?

Besides, I'm very sure the executives decided: why lose money from such a scheme, when you get millions from it?

zuzuzzzip
January 5th, 2008, 10:36 PM
Back on the original topic:
Those using Intel's disagreement for spead of FUD probably don't want us to read the flip side of this from Negropontef (http://money.cnn.com/2008/01/04/technology/kirkpatrick_negroponte.fortune/?postversion=2008010415)
That quite shows us what happened! And Seems like the project is running well too.

BDNiner
January 9th, 2008, 11:17 PM
http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9042679

This is another companies attempt at getting computers into the hands of the less fortunate. I am happy that these stories are getting attention now. the main aim is to get computers to the less fortunate, not what operating system or hardware it comes with. Now that larger companies like intel and MS are making moves in this regard it will only benefit the end users. even though it seems like their motives are anti linux instead of being pro children, the end result is several million children will hopefully have access to computers.

wolfear
January 10th, 2008, 03:58 PM
http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9042679

This is another companies attempt at getting computers into the hands of the less fortunate. I am happy that these stories are getting attention now. the main aim is to get computers to the less fortunate, not what operating system or hardware it comes with. Now that larger companies like intel and MS are making moves in this regard it will only benefit the end users. even though it seems like their motives are anti linux instead of being pro children, the end result is several million children will hopefully have access to computers.

Quiet interesting. Shame all it seems to be is a press release comparing apples and oranges by someone with a boob fetish i.e.-all of the endowed actress references.
One should not compare a laptop to Sandra Bullock or a comemercial venture selling cheap, low grade, thin clients to a custom designed laptop built by a non-profit if one exptects to be taken seriously.
The writer of that artile had no clue and was just writing what he was paid to write.

Peter6218
April 15th, 2008, 04:52 PM
OLPC is turning into a joke. Hard to predict if the product will ever be delivered.

Yes it has been and if my experience is anything to go by it will turn more children off computers than any other program ever has.

I understand a lot more now why Intel pulled out. The basic approach of OLPC is so flawed that to have your name associated with it would be poison. Obviously they fell for the "professional educators" crap, and never thought of the real world.

It's nothing but a kiddies toy. Even then they aren't very good, the child will soon tire of them and there is nothing else he can do with it. No browser, no email.

Expensive boat anchor.

popch
April 15th, 2008, 06:57 PM
... if my experience is anything to go by it will turn more children off computers than any other program ever has....

Do tell us a bit more about your experience.


The basic approach of OLPC is so flawed (...) No browser, no email.

Some flaw.

Peter6218
April 16th, 2008, 12:21 PM
The real reasons the OLPC is so bad and the warped thinking behind it.

http://tinyurl.com/5exse3

Negroponte Interview excerpts:

Fortune: What's the biggest single reason your partnership with Intel fell apart?

Negroponte: The biggest single reason was that they were directly selling their Classmate laptop as opposed to having it be a reference design.

That's enough for me to say Negroponte is rather stupid. "Reference design"?? What the Hell does he think Intel does for a living?? They sell things, eh? Why should they invest in developing a machine as a "reference design"?? Plus it happens to use the worlds standard software, Hello? Can you say Intel is smarter than OLPC ??

"You mean the pedagogic theories of self-instruction embodied in the XO software?

Yes. In fact in 1991 a Peruvian educator visited me at the MIT media lab and I introduced him to Seymour [Papert, the educational researcher who has been deeply involved in OLPC], and he was very taken with Seymour's theories. So he went back and sent several people to the U.S. to study those theories. They went back to Peru in the early 90s, and this man who started that work has recently become the Minister of Education. And several of the people he sent to the US are in the ministry working with him. "

And that only confirms my statement that OLPC had succumbed to the "Professional educators" and their Ivory Tower ideas.

PmDematagoda
April 16th, 2008, 12:46 PM
This thread is really going nowhere at all.

This thread is closed.