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Lambert
September 3rd, 2005, 02:00 AM
I'm curious how linux affected other users. Especially those who switched from windows and used linux as a main os with in a few months of switching.

I just switched a few months ago. I was just a end user who would consider my self to some degree a power user. I didn't know windows inside and out but I like to tear apart a program and find out how to maximize and use it to the fullest potential, every last feature it had to offer.

Now that I've switched to linux it's been a change on how I view and use my pc. It's not about a program and it's full potential but it is the os and it's full potential. I've really been enjoying reading all the documentation that's out there and then trying to apply what I read. I found a whole new world of computers in linux and like the idea of open source and what it offers.

So how about you? Was it just setting up and then using it in a similar manner (basic daily production)? Did you start making it more of a hobby and learn the ins and outs of a computer? Anything else you want say about your experience?

aysiu
September 3rd, 2005, 02:07 AM
Your Linux journey description matches me as well.
Sorry I don't have anything new to add.

xequence
September 3rd, 2005, 02:34 AM
Oddly enough, that description matches me somewhat also.

It has changed the way I view computers... In windows if something doesent work, it just doesent. In linux there is always a way.

racecat
September 3rd, 2005, 02:36 AM
I just switched a few months ago. I was just a end user who would consider my self to some degree a power user. I didn't know windows inside and out but I like to tear apart a program and find out how to maximize and use it to the fullest potential, every last feature it had to offer.

Now that I've switched to linux it's been a change on how I view and use my pc. It's not about a program and it's full potential but it is the os and it's full potential. I've really been enjoying reading all the documentation that's out there and then trying to apply what I read. I found a whole new world of computers in linux and like the idea of open source and what it offers.

So how about you? Was it just setting up and then using it in a similar manner (basic daily production)? Did you start making it more of a hobby and learn the ins and outs of a computer? Anything else you want say about your experience?

Me, too. I had wanted to play with Linux for awhile. I was looking for a more accessible OS to maybe learn a little programming on. After fumbling around with different distros for awhile, I landed in Ubuntu (It is a place, isn't it?). After about a week here, I got real comfortable with it and I hate turning on my Windows boxes for stuff I just haven't gotten transferred or working yet. I'm addicted.

Bill

poofyhairguy
September 3rd, 2005, 02:47 AM
In a few days my one year aniversery with Linux will be here. The most notable fact over the past year is I have spent $200 on Nvidia video cards!

Parkaboy
September 3rd, 2005, 02:48 AM
When I started I had no idea about distibutions, I had litlle experience with SUSE 7.1 at university. I got Slackware 9.0, It was dificult at first, but I loved it, my computer didnīt hang up when I switched it on, there were no stupid errors, I actually knew how the software I used worked and I could compile a kernel especifically for my computer. Later I tried all the important distros ending with Ubuntu. Basically I have now a system that is what I want it to be

ssck
September 3rd, 2005, 03:40 AM
i made the decision to move to linux when i bought this laptop in may which was not pre installed with windows.i just didn't want to pay for the OS.at the time, i had no idea about distributions, etc.it so happened that hoary had just been released and it was the top at www.distrowatch.com.so here i am.

ubuntu is now my main work machine.and so far, i have been able to get my work done with minimum fuss.so far, so good.

Galoot
September 3rd, 2005, 04:29 AM
I loved the old DOS command line because of the control it gave me. I reluctantly gave that up for Windows in order to run more current programs. DOS was still there in the shadows, but it sort of fell off the map for me.

I became a Windows "power user" to such a degree that it eventually got hard for me to spend any time at my own PC. I was too busy doing free tech support for everyone who knew me. For this reason, I may not become a huge Linux advocate, at least not as far as the people I know in real life. Selfish, yes, but I'm sick of being The Fixer. :|

I switched (not dual-booted, but switched) to Ubuntu a couple months ago and will probably never go back to Windows unless forced to by a job. It--Linux, not Ubuntu specifically--makes me realize both how much I missed the command line and how much more powerful a Linux terminal is compared to a DOS prompt.

Ubuntu in particular made the switch much easier than it might have been. I hemmed and hawed over several distros, but after seeing and running Hoary for a few hours I knew I'd found the one for me.

This switch, though, sure makes me wish I hadn't pooh-poohed my buddy twelve years ago when he handed me a Linux floppy.

Qrk
September 3rd, 2005, 04:33 AM
I switched because I bought my computer used, but the moment I connected to the net and downloaded a virus checking utility, I found 600 viruses. Now wonder the guy wanted to get rid of the computer. I couldn't remove all of them, and pretty soon I couldn't even boot windows. So I got Linux (MEPIS) using a friends computer. But when I discovered Ubuntu 4.10 and GNOME it was love at first sight.

Kvark
September 3rd, 2005, 12:16 PM
Switching from Windows to Ubuntu didn't affect me much. I still use the computer for the same things as before. The only difference is that now I don't do other things with the computer then just using it. Once properly set up Ubuntu just keeps working as it should so I don't have to play doctor with it. I actually fool around less with Ubuntu then I did with Windows because sudo reminds me that I shouldn't mess with system files and such. Also there is a lot less security risks to go paranoid about on Ubuntu then on Windows.

glandula
September 3rd, 2005, 12:31 PM
i basically changed about 2 months ago cos i strongly disliked everything i was reading about vista. i still reboot the computer about once a day, its like a compulsion, a result of using windows for a decade or more i guess.

ive learned to take things more easy. with ubuntu i can assume that things have gone well without having to check logs etc. in windows i assumed things went wrong, and they often did (i was a control freak i guess). linux brings me mental harmony cos i dont need to worry about these things :)

ive learned to read manuals and help files too. not sure if thats a good thing

otherwise i use the computer like before, doing the same things, but more happy to leave it to it and not keep an eye on things all the time

Hamman
September 3rd, 2005, 12:38 PM
Switching from Windows to Ubuntu didn't affect me much. I still use the computer for the same things as before. The only difference is that now I don't do other things with the computer then just using it. Once properly set up Ubuntu just keeps working as it should so I don't have to play doctor with it. I actually fool around less with Ubuntu then I did with Windows because sudo reminds me that I shouldn't mess with system files and such. Also there is a lot less security risks to go paranoid about on Ubuntu then on Windows.
For me, it began when I installed Slackware on my old box. It didn't have a internet connection and could barely run xfce, but I still thought Linux was pretty cool. Back then, that was the only computer that I had, so I kept using Windows on my parents computer, but I spent quite some time reading Linux forums and learning about KDE, Gnome, kernels, filesystems and so on. I also began to really dislike Microsoft, at least more than the usual "M$ suxx0r b3cuz 1 s4y s0"-crap that is quite common among geeky teenagers. The reason for me not liking MS is due to many things, like their closed formats and unfair way of competing but the main reason is the awful thing called Palladium. That they can do something like this without people reacting seemed absurd to me. I kept hoping that they would ditch it so I could stay in the familiarity of Windows, but nothing happened. I realized that I could either just give up and hope for the best or stand up and choose a free OS.
Needless to say, I choose the latter. 3 months ago I built this computer that I'm currently typing on and installled Ubuntu on it and I haven't regretted it. Sure, some thing are better implemented in Windows, but it goes the other way to. I still keep Windows for games and everytime I boot into XP I'm amazed over the fact that a completley free desktop enviroment is so much nicer to use and look at.

kagashe
September 3rd, 2005, 02:38 PM
Hi,

It is about one year now. I purchased HP/COMPAQ Presario 2500 Laptop with Mandrake Linux 9.1 CDs (with HP Logo) in Aug 04. Everything installed smoothly. Then I tried to upgrade to Mandrake Linux 10 and started learning about the Linux world (How free download versions do not have propritory drivers etc.) and support (Mandrake Club/Mandrakeusers.org).

I got Ubuntu 5.04 CD in June 05 and tried it on my daugther's desktop in dual boot with WinXP. Very soon I decided to install it in dual boot on my Laptop (with Mandriva 10).

I also got the unofficial add-on CD (which is the easiest way to install all the goodies) and since then I hardly login to Mandriva. But I find that partition manager of Mandriva is the best.

It is more than one year now and I am looking for building my own Linux distribution through LFS.

kagashe