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meekatron
November 17th, 2007, 10:37 PM
my dad has never used a computer before in his life. I have got him broadband for christmas and we have a reasonably fast computer for him to use. How do you think he will cope if i start him out from the start with ubuntu and no hint of windows at all. It could be fun.

Lostincyberspace
November 17th, 2007, 10:40 PM
It should probably be easier than starting windows with NO knowledge, at least if you use ubuntu.

Vansinnesvisan
November 17th, 2007, 10:47 PM
Contrary to popular belief, I think Linux is great for people who are new to computers. They are less likely to get in trouble as Linux isn't compatible with Window's malicious software and root/user accounts/privileges will stop them from doing something stupid. Like deleting a folder of dlls or configs.

meekatron
November 17th, 2007, 10:50 PM
my exact thoughts with the viruses and stuff
i don`t want to go to his house every other week and have to reinstall windows cus it is totally clogged up with crap

cursebg
November 17th, 2007, 10:57 PM
It would be a very helpful experiment :) At least we'll finally know in fact what's easier

hkgonra
November 17th, 2007, 11:12 PM
Keep us posted on how it goes.

RAV TUX
November 18th, 2007, 12:46 AM
my dad has never used a computer before in his life. I have got him broadband for christmas and we have a reasonably fast computer for him to use. How do you think he will cope if i start him out from the start with ubuntu and no hint of windows at all. It could be fun.

I just did this with my Dad bought him a gOS gPC and he loves it, I installed PokerTH on it(walked him through the install).

This is the best option for any new computer user.

yatt
November 18th, 2007, 12:55 AM
These people have the easiest time adapting to Linux. Not having any prior Windows knowledge means not having to relearn anything.

I know a woman who has her daughters using Linux (4 and 5) and it is no problem for them.

RAV TUX
November 18th, 2007, 12:56 AM
These people have the easiest time adapting to Linux. Not having any prior Windows knowledge means not having to relearn anything.& not having to undo any bad habits ;)

Spike-X
November 18th, 2007, 01:43 AM
How do you think he will cope if i start him out from the start with ubuntu and no hint of windows at all.

He should do fine. Ubuntu doesn't strike me as any harder to learn from scratch than Windows.

mellowd
November 18th, 2007, 01:50 AM
My mother runs linux.

As long as she doesn't need to get into the nitty gritty its all good

meekatron
November 18th, 2007, 02:22 AM
i was hoping for this kind of response.. i will keep you all posted he is a keen learner
it will be interesting cus he has no knowledge of any operating system so doesn`t know wot to expect.
i`m going to enjoy this
i`ll give him the link to this forum in a few months time..

Vadi
November 18th, 2007, 02:25 AM
My dad is going to send an aged dell laptop on which he put xubuntu (localized into their native language) on to his parents - they're in their 80's, and of course never used a computer before - I think they'll do okay.

jflaker
November 18th, 2007, 02:30 AM
my dad has never used a computer before in his life. I have got him broadband for christmas and we have a reasonably fast computer for him to use. How do you think he will cope if i start him out from the start with ubuntu and no hint of windows at all. It could be fun.

I have a good feeling about this........Go for it and keep this thread updated!

Lostincyberspace
November 18th, 2007, 02:32 AM
how can you not have used a computer in this day and age without living in a third world country?

Spike-X
November 18th, 2007, 02:33 AM
i was hoping for this kind of response.. i will keep you all posted he is a keen learner
it will be interesting cus he has no knowledge of any operating system so doesn`t know wot to expect.

It will probably work better that way; he won't be approaching it with the idea of "but everything's different!"

angryfirelord
November 18th, 2007, 02:41 AM
Personally, I think he should be much better off because he won't have the annoying "Windows dependency". I'm anxious to hear how this will turn out.

NightCrawler03X
November 21st, 2007, 10:40 PM
Your dad will be fine with Ubuntu.

Considering my little brother uses Slackware (I set it up myself though) with no problems, I see no reason why your dad can't happily use Ubuntu.

Just show him how to email, browse the web, write letters, etc, and he'll be fine

hkgonra
November 21st, 2007, 10:42 PM
You sir, are ignorant.
Ask any person between 30 and 50 even today, and they'll either not have any computer experience, or relatively little (average user).

Not really , I can't think of any person I know that is still working , or has worked in the past 5 years that hasn't had at least some computer exposure.

Lostincyberspace
November 21st, 2007, 10:42 PM
You sir, are ignorant.
Ask any person between 30 and 50 even today, and they'll either not have any computer experience, or relatively little (average user).


I dont know any one that has not used a computer atleast once And I know quite a few over 100.

NightCrawler03X
November 21st, 2007, 10:46 PM
Just one thing though, make sure you teach your dad how to use the keyboard and mouse, when each should be used, and why.

Believe it or not, not knowing these things can be pretty troublesome (even if one can figure it out).

SomeGuyDude
November 21st, 2007, 10:48 PM
I think it's easier to start with Linux than to try and go there from Windows. If it's his first, then starting off with Ubuntu should be no problem since he doesn't "expect" things to work a certain way.

davec64
November 21st, 2007, 11:00 PM
You've got to do it!
The logical way Ubuntu/Linux approaches things should make the learning process a lot simpler.
We've all been there with Windows with obscure error messages, and my favourite in XP, clicking start to shut the system down. The number of times I've bee asked why!!!!

DrMega
November 21st, 2007, 11:16 PM
my dad has never used a computer before in his life. I have got him broadband for christmas and we have a reasonably fast computer for him to use. How do you think he will cope if i start him out from the start with ubuntu and no hint of windows at all. It could be fun.

I say go for it. Ubuntu is easy to use, and without the bias of having been used to Windoze, your dad will surely be able to get the most out of his learning experience.

Windows is only easier for most because its what we are used to. What is easier, choosing Add/Remove... from the Application menu, or searching the net, downloading, unzipping, running setup.exe, answering a billion questions, only to find that the "free" version of what you've just downloaded doesn't do half the stuff it said on the tin.

In any case, I hope you let us all know what happens. Sorry to make this sound like an experiment, but it isn't very often you get to put a completely unbiased person in front of a Linux distro.

xpod
November 21st, 2007, 11:56 PM
my dad has never used a computer before in his life. I have got him broadband for christmas and we have a reasonably fast computer for him to use. How do you think he will cope if i start him out from the start with ubuntu and no hint of windows at all. It could be fun.

I am dad here at home and i`d never used a computer prior to last year either.Now i cant get enough of the things.
I seem to now have my very own "one pc per child" policy at home in fact. Thats my excuse anyway:)

I`d say starting him out with Ubuntu though would be a great idea.
Especially if he has you there to install & configure it all for him.
I never had that luxury so these good folks had to suffer my endless questions.

I never had the same luxury as your dad mind you......i had to suffer four months of Windows with before stumbling across Ubuntu:lolflag:

Thats a joke btw....i still spend loads of time in Windows.Just not my own:)

ice60
November 22nd, 2007, 01:00 AM
here's a blog post about that, i remember the first one, i haven't read this one - part 2.
http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/466

here's part 1
http://www.iredale.net/articles/desktop-adapted-dad-1.html

Bruce M.
November 22nd, 2007, 02:28 AM
You've got to do it!
The logical way Ubuntu/Linux approaches things should make the learning process a lot simpler.
We've all been there with Windows with obscure error messages, and my favourite in XP, clicking start to shut the system down. The number of times I've bee asked why!!!!

HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!


clicking start to shut the system down

I had to finish laughing and wipe the tears from my eyes before I could reply!
In all the years I've used Windows and this just never hit home.
BG couldn't even get that right!!!!!!!

As to: Re: my dad with a computer

He's one lucky dad!
In fact, he'll never realize just how lucky he is, and that's a good thing.

adamklempner
November 22nd, 2007, 08:34 AM
One more tip: If you can set up remote desktop so that you can gain access to his computer from your house, you'll be able to walk him through things step by step over the phone. It'll allow him to see things first hand (like the really simple things we take for granted) without requiring you to be there all of the time.

I plan to do this with my mother-in-law shortly and her first computer (going to be Linux also).

PartisanEntity
November 22nd, 2007, 09:28 AM
I have been wondering how my parents would fair with Ubuntu, they both are novice computer users, both still struggle with basic concepts, but they have come a long way. I remember when we got our first computer back in 94 I had to write down instructions for my dad on how to turn on the computer, good times :)

The problem with my dad at least is that even a slight change will throw him off and frustrate him fully. The moment he comes across something new he stops and asks for help instead of trying to solve an issue himself. For example he used to call me every time AVG popped up a window upon start up to inform him that it was updating the virus database, I don't know how many times I told him "It's okay Dad it's just updating the virus definitions" :).

I might start my mother off with Ubuntu, she seems to be doing better than my dad at adjusting with changes on the computer, although she uses MSN and Yahoo to talk to her family abroad so that's the main stumbling block, trying to get them all to switch to some open source and cross platform client would not be easy.

de_valentin
November 22nd, 2007, 09:50 AM
I might start my mother off with Ubuntu, she seems to be doing better than my dad at adjusting with changes on the computer, although she uses MSN and Yahoo to talk to her family abroad so that's the main stumbling block, trying to get them all to switch to some open source and cross platform client would not be easy.


Isn't Pidgin able to talk to all of those, perhaps not all the way (like msn has nudges that won't work) So only your mom would need to get used to use only 1 new application in stead of 2...

By the way OP go for it, I wish I had done the same thing 2 years ago with my parents, now my parents are used to xp but are nagging me about how many popups they need to read every time their computer starts. And that they have to pay again and again for something they allready bought once (mcafee), that really doesn't make any sense does it when you think of it in plain and simple terms. So now they are on AVG but it's definitly not an ideal situation.

PartisanEntity
November 22nd, 2007, 10:19 AM
Isn't Pidgin able to talk to all of those, perhaps not all the way (like msn has nudges that won't work) So only your mom would need to get used to use only 1 new application in stead of 2...

I meant voice calls, does Pidgin do that?

de_valentin
November 22nd, 2007, 12:36 PM
Nope not yet anyway. I use Skype but that does require others to join (at least if you want to call for free)

petersjm
November 22nd, 2007, 01:37 PM
Been thinking about this myself. My dad just ordered a laptop from a friend of his who works in the computer industry. It'll come pre-installed with Vista. I just wish I could be there (back in Northern Ireland) when it arrives, to wipe Vista and install Linux for him before he gets used to Vista. The only problem is that my dad's on the road a lot and wants wireless (I was amazed he knew what wireless was! He's only ever been on a computer a few times in his life) and I'm aware that Linux users often have problems with wireless. If I knew that would work out of the box, I'd get home and make the switch for him!

AlanRogers
November 22nd, 2007, 01:48 PM
You sir, are ignorant. Ask any person between 30 and 50 even today, and they'll either not have any computer experience, or relatively little (average user).That is really quite an amazingly ignorant, totally uninformed, blatently inflamatory and patently incorrect statement in and of itself. I fall within those parameters, and have been using a computer since I was 11. My parents do and I have 80+ year old friends that do. I suspect that a significant percentage of this forum also fall within your age group, 30 to 50. Unbelievable.

beercz
November 22nd, 2007, 01:54 PM
<*slightly off topic*>
Years ago I saw a cartoon in a newspaper where a man was in a computer shop and just bought a new computer.

The sales assistant said to the purchaser: "If you have any problems with your new computer, just ask your son."

I know exactly how that son feels!
</*slightly off topic*>

My dad uses windows on his desktop pc and ubuntu on his laptop and transfers files between the two quite happily. He's in his 70s.

xpod
November 22nd, 2007, 02:38 PM
You sir, are ignorant. Ask any person between 30 and 50 even today, and they'll either not have any computer experience, or relatively little (average user).

The word "any" kind of jumps out of that statement(ignoring the insults of course).
I`d have thought much of the technology you use in your daily life would have been invented/designed/built by that age group you mention.:confused:

I do know what you were trying to say though...kinda.
Most people i know(fellow moms & pops) that do have pc`s have usually had them for varying numbers of years but yet still could`nt tell you the slightest thing about them.
I`d only been using Windows myself a few months last year and still didn`t know my a**e from my elbow but yet i was helping people i knew who`d had the things for years in many cases.:???:
Now i help every pc user in the area it seems at times ....it`s a curse.
I dont mind really,the more i learn the more my kids learn.Plus it`s has it`s other benifits:)

That though was my only reason for ever sitting down at a pc in the first place.I knew tooo many other familes with young kids let loose on the pc`s & internet when the parents themselves did`nt have a clue what was going going on.
II have 4 young girls,that scared me into action i suppose.

There are also many many people in my age group that i know who have never touched computers though and probably never will.

Spike-X
November 22nd, 2007, 10:26 PM
You sir, are ignorant.
Ask any person between 30 and 50 even today, and they'll either not have any computer experience, or relatively little (average user).

Er...any person?

I'm 37, and not only did I install Ubuntu on my computer all by myself, I also built the damn thing.

beercz
November 23rd, 2007, 02:00 AM
Er...any person?

I'm 37, and not only did I install Ubuntu on my computer all by myself, I also built the damn thing.

I am 46 and have an MSc in Distributed Systems and Networks, and a BSc in Computer Science.

Think I can cope with PCs :-)

Lostincyberspace
November 23rd, 2007, 04:15 AM
<*slightly off topic*>
Years ago I saw a cartoon in a newspaper where a man was in a computer shop and just bought a new computer.

The sales assistant said to the purchaser: "If you have any problems with your new computer, just ask your son."

I know exactly how that son feels!
</*slightly off topic*>.

Me to, and my dad is getting his masters in computer visualizeation so you think he wouldn't need help? go figure.

meekatron
December 18th, 2007, 01:22 AM
well its been a while but i have actally done it.
my dad is now happily using ubuntu and loves it. it has been a wee bit stressful, i took me 30mins to explain to him what the desktop was, and you can imagine how much longer to copy photos from a sd card to his pictures folder. But the good thing is he is lovin it. He is getting the hang of it. But i have told him to stop phoning me with every simple problem and to use the web for solutions.
he is gettin better every day i set up his pidgin for him with google talk and he thinks that is the business.
I`ll keep ya posted how he fairs out, who knows he could be showing me how to do stuff sooner or later cus i`m no expert myself.

my next task is to put ubuntu on my mates old apple g3

Lostincyberspace
December 18th, 2007, 03:50 AM
That is great. Hope everything goes fine.

mmb1
December 18th, 2007, 05:12 AM
Haha, I had to convert my Dad to Ubuntu, he was sold once I showed him that he could have more forms of Solitaire in Linux than he'd ever dreamed of.

hkgonra
December 18th, 2007, 03:55 PM
Haha, I had to convert my Dad to Ubuntu, he was sold once I showed him that he could have more forms of Solitaire in Linux than he'd ever dreamed of.

LOL , I am betting I will run into the same thing with my wife.

sailor2001
December 18th, 2007, 09:17 PM
the worst thing that can happen to an old person (ie 65-95) is boredom.....Ubuntu provides completely unlimited tasks to perform and learn...I think the greatest selling point of Ubuntu is the synaptics

popch
December 18th, 2007, 09:26 PM
the worst thing that can happen to an old person (ie 65-95) is boredom.....Ubuntu provides completely unlimited tasks to perform and learn...I think the greatest selling point of Ubuntu is the synaptics

Whose synaptics? The 90-years-old users' ?