PDA

View Full Version : Ubuntu is a great stepping stone to Debian! | Ubuntu is always a homerun!



RAV TUX
September 25th, 2007, 03:47 AM
I have tried and used a lot of Linux distros....

Bottom line I started with Ubuntu

I used and tried probably well over 500+ distros

built two of my own distros...

I am currently using Debian Lenny via Elive Gem 1.0

The short story to my longer story is that Ubuntu is a great stepping stone to Debian and I think all involved with Ubuntu for this wonderful tool.

Ubuntu made Debian possible for me and perhaps others to?

For some Ubuntu may have been a stepping stone to other distros like Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, fedora, openSUSE etc.

Ubuntu is even a stepping stone to BSD and OS X!

Where ever Ubuntu users end up, or even if they stay with Ubuntu, it's all good and Ubuntu has left a lasting positive footprint in the Linux/*nix world.

Some could consider Ubuntu homebase, and no matter what part of the Linux field one may be in, coming home to Ubuntu is always a homerun.

My Linux trip has been very wonderful and I Thank Ubuntu for it all. Now Linux has become a way of life for me, because of Ubuntu I have learned to interact with my computer and online experience 1000 times more then I have ever dreamed.

Linux(Ubuntu) is simply awesome!

fuscia
September 25th, 2007, 03:50 AM
you'll be back to windows95 by midnight.

RAV TUX
September 25th, 2007, 03:52 AM
you'll be back to windows95 by midnight.
LOL funny I don't think I have ever used windows 95. ;)

fuscia
September 25th, 2007, 03:56 AM
LOL funny I don't think I have ever used windows 95. ;)

dude, it was awesome! it could be your OS!

dfreer
September 25th, 2007, 03:58 AM
500+ Linux Distros? 0.o

kerry_s
September 25th, 2007, 04:20 AM
debian is fantastic, i haven't used anything else since moving to debian. it's so flexible i can always have it my way. :)

FuturePilot
September 25th, 2007, 04:51 AM
I have tried and used a lot of Linux distros....

Bottom line I started with Ubuntu

I used and tried probably well over 500+ distros

built two of my own distros...

I am currently using Debian Lenny via Elive Gem 1.0

The short story to my longer story is that Ubuntu is a great stepping stone to Debian and I think all involved with Ubuntu for this wonderful tool.

Ubuntu made Debian possible for me and perhaps others to?

For some Ubuntu may have been a stepping stone to other distros like Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, fedora, openSUSE etc.

Ubuntu is even a stepping stone to BSD and OS X!

Where ever Ubuntu users end up, or even if they stay with Ubuntu, it's all good and Ubuntu has left a lasting positive footprint in the Linux/*nix world.

Some could consider Ubuntu homebase, and no matter what part of the Linux field one may be in, coming home to Ubuntu is always a homerun.

My Linux trip has been very wonderful and I Thank Ubuntu for it all. Now Linux has become a way of life for me, because of Ubuntu I have learned to interact with my computer and online experience 1000 times more then I have ever dreamed.

Linux/Ubuntu is simply awesome!

I know exactly what that's like. I would try out different distros and after a few days I would always come back to Ubuntu for some reason or another. And it always felt good to be back on Ubuntu. It does feel like home.


you'll be back to windows95 by midnight.

:lolflag:

-grubby
September 25th, 2007, 04:54 AM
yes it is, the only reason I even used linux was because of Ubuntu. I use Debian now and understand everything

RAV TUX
September 25th, 2007, 05:00 AM
I know exactly what that's like. I would try out different distros and after a few days I would always come back to Ubuntu for some reason or another. And it always felt good to be back on Ubuntu. It does feel like home.






yes it is, the only reason I even used linux was because of Ubuntu. I use Debian now and understand everything

You are both my kind of people. ;)

macogw
September 25th, 2007, 05:57 AM
500+ Linux Distros? 0.o

I've seen the stacks of CDs to prove it.

I set up Debian Etch for at home, and I have it on my laptop, but it dislikes my hardware so I can't boot it. I'll have to chroot into it and upgrade to Lenny (that should be ok with my hardware since Ubuntu is).

RAV TUX
September 25th, 2007, 06:02 AM
I've seen the stacks of CDs to prove it.

I set up Debian Etch for at home, and I have it on my laptop, but it dislikes my hardware so I can't boot it. I'll have to chroot into it and upgrade to Lenny (that should be ok with my hardware since Ubuntu is).
Try installing the Elive Gem 1.0 CD and then just enable the Debian Lenny debs in your synaptic repositories...then update and upgrade and all that goodness, then you get a stable e17 within Debian Lenny (The Elive CVS's won't work this way, but who needs to crash all the time)...

LinuxTracker.org has a free torrent download of Elive Gem 1.0

EDIT: or which ever way works for you ;)

Chilli Bob
September 25th, 2007, 06:52 AM
I've never tried Debian. What is it about it that you prefer over Ubuntu (or other distros). Just curious.

beercz
September 25th, 2007, 10:06 AM
I used Debian as a stepping stone to Ubuntu.

I have been a Debian user since 2001, long before Ubuntu came out. Started with Debian potato.

In fact I still use Debian (etch) on my servers, Ubuntu (gutsy/feisty) on my laptops. Started Ubuntu with warty.

SunnyRabbiera
September 25th, 2007, 10:55 AM
Debian is a good thing to look at, from a distance of course in my mind.
I find debians idealogical stance too idealogical though, its pure FSF only stance is a double edged sword... its good for all those FSF fanatics but not people like me who are all to aware that this is a microsoft world and from a pure idealogical standpoint this is tough to face.
But I will give debian its dues.

n3tfury
September 25th, 2007, 11:57 AM
yay another rave topic

RAV TUX
September 25th, 2007, 01:17 PM
I have tried and used a lot of Linux distros....

Bottom line I started with Ubuntu

I used and tried probably well over 500+ distros

built two of my own distros...

I am currently using Debian Lenny via Elive Gem 1.0

The short story to my longer story is that Ubuntu is a great stepping stone to Debian and I think all involved with Ubuntu for this wonderful tool.

Ubuntu made Debian possible for me and perhaps others to?

For some Ubuntu may have been a stepping stone to other distros like Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, fedora, openSUSE etc.

Ubuntu is even a stepping stone to BSD and OS X!

Where ever Ubuntu users end up, or even if they stay with Ubuntu, it's all good and Ubuntu has left a lasting positive footprint in the Linux/*nix world.

Some could consider Ubuntu homebase, and no matter what part of the Linux field one may be in, coming home to Ubuntu is always a homerun.

My Linux trip has been very wonderful and I Thank Ubuntu for it all. Now Linux has become a way of life for me, because of Ubuntu I have learned to interact with my computer and online experience 1000 times more then I have ever dreamed.

Linux/Ubuntu is simply awesome!Please read the complete OP and not just the title

plb
September 25th, 2007, 02:29 PM
500+ distros?...I somehow doubt that...not that they don't exist but why would anyone try so many?

n3tfury
September 25th, 2007, 02:46 PM
Please read the complete OP and not just the title

i did, especially the last sentence. i'm just giving you grief. ;)

Sporkman
September 25th, 2007, 03:05 PM
i did, especially the last sentence.

:lol:

RAV TUX
September 25th, 2007, 11:35 PM
500+ distros?...I somehow doubt that...not that they don't exist but why would anyone try so many?

Shun the non-believer!


i did, especially the last sentence. i'm just giving you grief. ;)

:lolflag:

yabbadabbadont
September 25th, 2007, 11:46 PM
I could believe that you installed 500+ versions of Linux, but I doubt that you actually used them. Even if you only spent one day on each, that is about a year and a half of doing nothing but installing and using a different distro every day. :shock: :lol:

RAV TUX
September 26th, 2007, 12:36 AM
I could believe that you installed 500+ versions of Linux, but I doubt that you actually used them. Even if you only spent one day on each, that is about a year and a half of doing nothing but installing and using a different distro every day. :shock: :lol:
Exactly installing and using are two completely different things. I have found very few worth using, even fewer that are actually usable.


I have tried and used a lot of Linux distros....



...I used and tried probably well over 500+ distros

The key word is "tried", I consider a distro "tried" to see if it even installs, I have no patience for lazy developers, if it doesn't work I move on to the next one. I don't have an infinite amount of time to waste on each and every distro that I try.

steveneddy
September 26th, 2007, 12:45 AM
dude, it was awesome! it could be your OS!

I LOVE windows 95. I still use it on a daily basis. I also have an apple PowerPC that I use on weekends to write letters. It's great to e-mail my grannie on the old PowerPC because it isn't a real fast machine, and that is important because my grannie can't read real fast, either.

:popcorn:

Lord Illidan
September 26th, 2007, 12:46 AM
I'm betting that by tomorrow Rav Tux will have installed Windows 1.0, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 98 SE, Windows 2000, Windows ME, Windows XP, and as a grand finale, Windows Vista Ultimate. All while blindfolded, and all on a toaster. Points will be given if the bread is not burnt.

Lord Illidan
September 26th, 2007, 12:46 AM
I LOVE windows 95. I still use it on a daily basis. I also have an apple PowerPC that I use on weekends to write letters. It's great to e-mail my grannie on the old PowerPC because it isn't a real fast machine, and that is important because my grannie can't read real fast, either.

:popcorn:

What do you send her the e-mails in real time?

machoo02
September 26th, 2007, 12:50 AM
I'm betting that by tomorrow Rav Tux will have installed Windows 1.0, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 98 SE, Windows 2000, Windows ME, Windows XP, and as a grand finale, Windows Vista Ultimate. All while blindfolded, and all on a toaster. Points will be given if the bread is not burnt.

and here I thought it was K. Mandla who had a knack for the low-spec installations. Who knew Rav was a technomancer as well...

steveneddy
September 26th, 2007, 12:53 AM
What do you send her the e-mails in real time?

Actually, the win95 machine is our fax machine (saves paper) and the Mac (Apple) turns the lights on and off for us while we are on the road ( we're rock stars, you know). Makes it look like we are at home while away.

None of these machines are actually hooked up to the internet all of the time, maybe twice a year, and they still run very well.

We keep them in a mini-fridge in a closet in the garage and run the network to the closet to access them remotely. Why the mini-fridge? Because they run better while cool. Really.

Lord Illidan
September 26th, 2007, 12:55 AM
Actually, the win95 machine is our fax machine (saves paper) and the Mac (Apple) turns the lights on and off for us while we are on the road ( we're rock stars, you know). Makes it look like we are at home while away.

None of these machines are actually hooked up to the internet all of the time, maybe twice a year, and they still run very well.

We keep them in a mini-fridge in a closet in the garage and run the network to the closet to access them remotely. Why the mini-fridge? Because they run better while cool. Really.

Thank god my laptop is not in the fridge..Otherwise, I'd be perpetually frozen.

init1
September 26th, 2007, 03:27 AM
debian is fantastic, i haven't used anything else since moving to debian. it's so flexible i can always have it my way. :)
Definitely :D

init1
September 26th, 2007, 03:33 AM
I have tried and used a lot of Linux distros....

Bottom line I started with Ubuntu

I used and tried probably well over 500+ distros

built two of my own distros...

I am currently using Debian Lenny via Elive Gem 1.0

The short story to my longer story is that Ubuntu is a great stepping stone to Debian and I think all involved with Ubuntu for this wonderful tool.

Ubuntu made Debian possible for me and perhaps others to?

For some Ubuntu may have been a stepping stone to other distros like Arch, Slackware, Gentoo, fedora, openSUSE etc.

Ubuntu is even a stepping stone to BSD and OS X!

Where ever Ubuntu users end up, or even if they stay with Ubuntu, it's all good and Ubuntu has left a lasting positive footprint in the Linux/*nix world.

Some could consider Ubuntu homebase, and no matter what part of the Linux field one may be in, coming home to Ubuntu is always a homerun.

My Linux trip has been very wonderful and I Thank Ubuntu for it all. Now Linux has become a way of life for me, because of Ubuntu I have learned to interact with my computer and online experience 1000 times more then I have ever dreamed.

Linux/Ubuntu is simply awesome!
I agree. Ubuntu was nice to start out with because I didn't have to do anything to get it to work. Now, I prefer Debian because I like how basic the minimal install is.

Wiebelhaus
September 26th, 2007, 03:47 AM
I have tried and used a lot of Linux distros....

Bottom line I started with Ubuntu

I used and tried probably well over 500+ distros

built two

******* abbreviated********

Linux/Ubuntu is simply awesome!

which one do you recommend? does it use synaptic and nautilus or is it like a thin client install where you add the packages and managers and stuff you like , I have a 160 master drive with Kubuntu on it and a secondary drive with PCLOS , If I install the debian version you recommend , does the grub installation go as smooth as the Ubuntu one? as in adding other OS's without killing them?

Thanks , I'm really interested in hearing what you have to say rav , thanks again.

Frak
September 26th, 2007, 03:50 AM
Debian is the Slackware or Gentoo of my world. Only Better! :)

Wiebelhaus
September 26th, 2007, 04:00 AM
Holy crap bat man am I reading this right?

http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/4.0_r1/i386/iso-dvd/

Three dvd's?

Frak
September 26th, 2007, 04:09 AM
Three!!! I could have sworn it was 40 CD's. Phew! ;)

woedend
September 26th, 2007, 04:15 AM
I also started with ubuntu. Well, mandrake actually but never got past installing and finding it useless and going back to windows. came back to distrowatch couple years later and saw ubuntu, which i had never heard of....so tried it out. Loved it! As time grew on, i grew tired of fixed released systems, the bundled "newby" apps, and how broken the dev releases were, so moved on(not badmouthing ubuntu, i just outgrew it so to speak). I use arch on my desktop for a while now, rolling release and rock stable. I am writing this from my debian sid laptop. Seems pretty stable and works well...still would like to dive into getting arch installed...need to read up on kernel panics upon install(my time to play with distros has run out as i'm busy these days).
But, as the OP states, i owe it to ubuntu.

RAV TUX
September 26th, 2007, 04:26 AM
which one do you recommend? does it use synaptic and nautilus or is it like a thin client install where you add the packages and managers and stuff you like , I have a 160 master drive with Kubuntu on it and a secondary drive with PCLOS , If I install the debian version you recommend , does the grub installation go as smooth as the Ubuntu one? as in adding other OS's without killing them?

Thanks , I'm really interested in hearing what you have to say rav , thanks again.

I like Elive Gem1.0, because I like an Enlightenment 17 environment, Elive Gem is based on Debian Etch but I have done some steps that they will warn you not to do. After trying both upgrading to the Elive CVS's and alternately upgrading to Debian Lenny(you cant do both). I choose to enable Debian Lenny on my Elive Gem 1.0 and not do the Elive CVS...I have also installed KDE and some KDE applications that don't come with the base KDE Lenny install.

What I have is a very stable hybrid of Debian Lenny and Elive Gem...

It is my own little utopia.

Elive Gem 1.0 does have the best Grub screen by default also.

I hope this helps

Sporkman
September 26th, 2007, 05:00 AM
What's the point of doing different distros? Are they really that different, other than the level of hassle in setting them up, & their package manager that people tend to be opinionated about?

FYI, Ubuntu is my first & only distro (other than the Red Hat that I use at work, but did not set up - uses the same old Gnome as Ubuntu),

luckyd
September 26th, 2007, 05:08 AM
I agree with sporkman (although I have yet to try out arch), I used debian but switched to Ubuntu because of the mainstreamedness and support of many apps. I love Ubuntu, and it is also a way for me to try to convert my friends to linux because it usually just works.

mdsmedia
September 26th, 2007, 05:28 AM
I LOVE windows 95. I still use it on a daily basis. I also have an apple PowerPC that I use on weekends to write letters. It's great to e-mail my grannie on the old PowerPC because it isn't a real fast machine, and that is important because my grannie can't read real fast, either.

:popcorn:LOL I remember booting into 3.1x at one stage not so long ago.... come to think of it it was about 5 years ago, pre-Linux, because I had some sort of problem with XP (or was it 98? No, XP). That was a strange experience. For someone who thought he was a Windows power-user back in the 3.x days, I only vaguely remembered it.

Raval
September 26th, 2007, 05:35 AM
What's the point of doing different distros? Are they really that different, other than the level of hassle in setting them up, & their package manager that people tend to be opinionated about?

FYI, Ubuntu is my first & only distro (other than the Red Hat that I use at work, but did not set up - uses the same old Gnome as Ubuntu),

Wanted to support Linux by becoming a user because it was an alternative to Windows so a friend pointed me to distrowatch.

Being on dialup downloading multiple CDs for one distro would have been a nightmare.

Notice Ubuntu was single CD and shipped pressed copies. It was perfect.

I am curious about other distros but don't have the time and not intersted enough to start installing a lot of them.

I think if I ever left Ubuntu it would be for a popular distro like Fedora or OpenSuse.

p_quarles
September 26th, 2007, 05:49 AM
I use Ubuntu for my desktop and laptop, Basically because I'm lazy and would rather not have to hunt down the third-party repositories for all the packages I want.

My server, however, runs on Debian Etch, and I love it to death. Ridiculously stable, very minimal installation, and it's (so far) done an excellent job of 404'ing the scriptkiddies.

machoo02
September 26th, 2007, 06:59 PM
Holy crap bat man am I reading this right?

http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/4.0_r1/i386/iso-dvd/

Three dvd's?

If you look in http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/4.0_r1/i386/iso-cd/ you will find an image called netinst.iso. This image only contains a minimal system and will allow you to perform a network installation. It's the only one you really need (if you have network access).

RAV TUX
September 26th, 2007, 11:39 PM
If you look in http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/4.0_r1/i386/iso-cd/ you will find an image called netinst.iso. This image only contains a minimal system and will allow you to perform a network installation. It's the only one you really need (if you have network access).I have heard a net install is the best way to go but have yet to try it.

Frak
September 26th, 2007, 11:41 PM
I have heard a net install is the best way to go but have yet to try it.
Net Inst takes about half an hour on a large install. (and low speed ISP ;))

Wiebelhaus
September 27th, 2007, 12:53 AM
If you look in http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/4.0_r1/i386/iso-cd/ you will find an image called netinst.iso. This image only contains a minimal system and will allow you to perform a network installation. It's the only one you really need (if you have network access).

thanks mate.

adamorjames
September 27th, 2007, 01:07 AM
Yeah, I like Ubuntu it's like home. Maybe someday I'll try out Fedora or some other big distro.

machoo02
September 27th, 2007, 03:01 AM
I have heard a net install is the best way to go but have yet to try it.The best thing about net-install is that you will get the latest version of the packages rather than the ones that are on the full install cd's, saving yourself an aptitude update/upgrade cycle.