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View Full Version : I'm trying to plan for college, I could use some input...



SZF2001
August 29th, 2007, 05:44 PM
Hey guys, it's my senior year in high school, and I have a future to be thinking about... For one thing, I plan on getting my college applications done in November so I can get my answers in December, and not worry about that for the rest of the year.

Anyway, onto my plight:

You see, I want to major in two things - computer networking (or something like it, I'm not exactly sure what the deal is - I just hope they don't throw stupid crap at me like Flash and Java...) and the English language. Granted, I may not be the best typist on a computer and on a forum, but I'm very into the arts and especially with old English literature and what have you.

I hope someday I can publish a book. I want to do the networking for the sake of securing some money - that's my first priority, to settle myself in and get a good pay before I dive in and experiment with writings and whatnot.

Here's the thing - I haven't touched anything related to Windows in a while (if you exclude school, which isn't me really working on a computer, just using it) - I haven't used DOS in years... And I hear that a lot of networking techs are into Microsoft's .Net stuff. What is that, exactly? I can set up a small LAN in my home, making other computers "shells", I like to call them, and put them into deep freeze to refresh the hard drive and stuff... But that's using things like Fedora and Debian. How hard is it to mess around with .Net?

That's basically the major question. Also, maybe some insight on the college life. I am setting up goals because I don't want to just wonder on in there without a clue on what I'm doing and end up where I don't want to be... Thanks in advance!

BDNiner
August 29th, 2007, 06:02 PM
I don't know of any schools that have a computer networking degree. you should think about an engineering degree or computer science. Java was my first class in college, and it helps a lot in understanding programming. .Net is a programming platform it has nothing to do with networking in the sense you are talking about. computer science and engineering will help you understand the theory behind computing, so it won't matter what system you are working on you will be able to apply that knowledge and just learn the syntax to accomplish what you want to do. in fact i just keep reference book around so that i can look up the syntax.

oh yeah and most of the plans you had for yourself go out the window before your first year is over. I actually switched majors 3 times before i graduated. So don't have such a closed mind about your goals in life. you will figure out where you want to head in life whether it takes you 4 years or 7.

LaRoza
August 29th, 2007, 06:08 PM
computer networking (or something like it, I'm not exactly sure what the deal is - I just hope they don't throw stupid crap at me like Flash and Java...) and the English language.

Here's the thing - I haven't touched anything related to Windows in a while (if you exclude school, which isn't me really working on a computer, just using it) - I haven't used DOS in years... And I hear that a lot of networking techs are into Microsoft's .Net stuff. What is that, exactly? I can set up a small LAN in my home, making other computers "shells", I like to call them, and put them into deep freeze to refresh the hard drive and stuff... But that's using things like Fedora and Debian. How hard is it to mess around with .Net?

That's basically the major question. Also, maybe some insight on the college life. I am setting up goals because I don't want to just wonder on in there without a clue on what I'm doing and end up where I don't want to be... Thanks in advance!

The computer networking program at my college uses Windows, however, they are clueless about Linux (students), and since Linux is heavily used in networking environments, they are at a disadvantage.

.NET is for programming, which you will not do if you are in Networking. You might find is useful to know a little VBScript or VB, if you are using Windows, but it is not all that important.

Networking with Windows, is not hard, so your knowledge will serve you well. Windows, from what I have seen is easy to learn, but I don't trust it.

For college, follow these rules and be successful:

* Don't do anything stupid and risky. Many are tempted to drink, fornicate, and otherwise engage in risky behavior. They should grow up.
* Sleep at night.
* Take care of your body, eat healthy.
* Don't miss class.
* Have fun.

Good luck!

dasunst3r
August 29th, 2007, 06:08 PM
I am a third-year electrical engineering major, and I would like to throw in my +1 for what BDNiner said. Everybody thought I was going to do computer stuff for the rest of my life, but they were totally caught off-guard when I told them I want to do something with power grids and renewable energy. I discovered my interest in that after my second year in college right as I was getting ready to pick my specialties ("Tech areas"). Seriously, consider being an engineer, and you will be quite versatile.

Remember that you can always double-major.

Edit: +1 also for LaRoza. Freedom comes with responsibilities. Too often do first-years get public intoxication or underage drinking citations the moment they step on campus, and that has adverse effects on their careers. Think before you act, and you will go far. The "right" choice is not necessarily the popular choice.

FurryNemesis
August 29th, 2007, 06:20 PM
I'm doing an International Relations degree at the moment so I can't help you on the choice of course side, but what I would say is that it's never too early to start budgeting. Have some sort of spending plan for the week and try to estimate your outgoings before you start. My equation goes something like:

(Money from student loan + Money from summer jobs + Money from gifts + Money from work) - (Rent + Tuition Fees + Utilities if applicable + A weekly food and drink budget + Misc expenses + Entertainment)

Apart from rent and fees, the most important outgoing is food and drink. Eat healthily and you'll be able to concentrate better and work more efficiently. My budget per week is about 35 including drinks, which over here is actually quite high. Do a general budget for the month to start out with, and then refine it if that helps. Also look into getting student discounts if you can; here in the UK you can generally get 10 - 15% off goods and services if you're a member of the National Union of Students - I'm not sure if there's something like that where you live.

The first three weeks of term will be the most expensive. There are university fees to pay, clubs to join and books to buy. Don't panic, and try and set yourself a larger budget for that month if you can. Also, don't buy every book on the reading list for your course - most of them will be in the library.

Lastly, if you do get into a sticky situation, see if your college or university offers financial advice or "hardship loans". Again, most UK universities do, not sure about abroad.

Good luck!

BDNiner
August 29th, 2007, 08:11 PM
Also try and have fun. College is less about what degree you get and more about learning to be an adult. Most of the best lessons i learned were not in the class room. The earlier you get into good eating/sleeping/responsability habits the better off you will be. But i noticed all of this in hindsight. there is no one standing over your shoulder tell you to do your homework, study, and take care of yourself. so it is easy to let things slip a little bit. Oh and aim for scholarships, loans are a pain to pay off, i still have about $55,000 to go. I am on the 30 years payment plan.

These loans made it hard for me to recently buy a new car, in the end i had to put a $6000 deposit before they would give me an auto loan for the rest.

Tux Aubrey
August 29th, 2007, 10:23 PM
* Don't do anything stupid and risky. Many are tempted to drink, fornicate, and otherwise engage in risky behavior. They should grow up.
* Sleep at night.
* Take care of your body, eat healthy.
* Don't miss class.
* Have fun.

Wow. Things have REALLY changed since I was college/university in the late '70s. And I'm not sure its all for the better.

I think your should enjoy yourself.

And don't write any books until you have done something interesting and gained some genuine insight.

tcpip4lyfe
August 29th, 2007, 10:57 PM
You might want to look for a college with a good Cisco program. I have a computer networking degree from a good community College. It was through the Cisco Academy. You learn the basics of cisco routers and switches the first year in Cisco 1 and 2. Also you learn how to subnet and document as well as some other basic stuff. The second year in cisco 3 and 4 it was advanced stuff like how Vlans work, setting up T-1s, HDLC frame formats and other wan technologies, and splicing fibre. At the end of the cisco academy you can take your test to get your CCNA and become cisco certified and pretty much work where ever you want. The cisco router command shell is basically linux so it was pretty easy to pick up. There was no programming besides scripts. It was a lot of fun and I enjoyed going to class every single day.

Henaro
August 29th, 2007, 11:24 PM
* Don't do anything stupid and risky. Many are tempted to drink, fornicate, and otherwise engage in risky behavior. They should grow up.
* Sleep at night.
* Take care of your body, eat healthy.
* Don't miss class.
* Have fun.
The last one contradicts with all of the above. ;)

SZF2001
August 30th, 2007, 02:49 AM
Don't write any books? Who says they aren't non-fiction?

DownTown22
August 30th, 2007, 02:52 AM
The last one contradicts with all of the above. ;)

Agreed! Don't let people tell you what you should/shouldn't do while at university/college...just have fun! Whatever you want to do to have fun...do it!

DAFORZE
October 18th, 2007, 05:07 PM
The computer networking program at my college uses Windows, however, they are clueless about Linux (students), and since Linux is heavily used in networking environments, they are at a disadvantage.

.NET is for programming, which you will not do if you are in Networking. You might find is useful to know a little VBScript or VB, if you are using Windows, but it is not all that important.

Networking with Windows, is not hard, so your knowledge will serve you well. Windows, from what I have seen is easy to learn, but I don't trust it.

For college, follow these rules and be successful:

* Don't do anything stupid and risky. Many are tempted to drink, fornicate, and otherwise engage in risky behavior. They should grow up.
* Sleep at night.
* Take care of your body, eat healthy.
* Don't miss class.
* Have fun.

Good luck!

Well of course everybody's his own believe but I'm a student too and I think it's actually important to have sex in college (and in general), you feel better and healthier and as a result study better :cool:

m0eman
October 18th, 2007, 05:21 PM
* Don't do anything stupid and risky. Many are tempted to drink, fornicate, and otherwise engage in risky behavior. They should grow up.
* Sleep at night.
* Take care of your body, eat healthy.
* Don't miss class.

Ooops x4