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Hexydes
July 5th, 2007, 08:08 PM
I posted this little brochure on my blog of what I feel the most important applications I use in Ubuntu (aside from the pre-installed ones) are. Maybe those new to Ubuntu might find it helpful. :)

http://www.hexydes.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=42&Itemid=9

Feel free to leave comments if you think I missed anything! I'm still pretty new myself, so I'm always looking for new software! Also, Digg the story up if you like it; you never can have too many Ubuntu stories hit the front page of Digg. ;)

tr@ppist
July 5th, 2007, 10:24 PM
You listed Nero as item #6. Why would I need it? K3B is an excellent application that does all I need better than Nero.

Hexydes
July 5th, 2007, 10:27 PM
Yeah, really tough call. As nice as K3B is, I do think that Nero is a bit more polished, and I seem to have a bit more success with it. Certainly, if you don't want to shell out the $30 for Nero, K3B is not going to be a disappointment. :)

moredhel
July 5th, 2007, 10:29 PM
So you are saying that Nero is better than K3B enough to pay £15?

I don't think so, after using both.

(WHY DOES K3B HAVE TO BE KDE :( )

Hexydes
July 5th, 2007, 10:37 PM
In my opinion, yes, but I suppose that would depend what that amount of money was worth to you. If I was back in school again, writing this same list, K3B likely would have beat Nero out. ;)

illu45
July 6th, 2007, 02:30 AM
I'm not sure that Azureus is the best BT client for *nix. I usually use Deluge, although KTorrent is also a nice option for KDM users. I've always found Azureus way too clunky. Also, uTorrent works quite well through Wine.

EDIT: Also, I've always been fond of Zim for ToDo lists and organization, although BasKet and TomTom are popular choices as well.

p_quarles
July 6th, 2007, 02:49 AM
Beryl at #1? Admittedly, it's a very pretty window manager, but until it's stable and supported on a range of hardware, I don't think it's a "must have."

n36atr0n
July 6th, 2007, 03:54 AM
Do you have any recomendation to substitute my windows "wordpress" for i use in ubuntu? Seems so cool if we can modificating blog from ubuntu too.

diatribe
July 6th, 2007, 03:59 AM
for the software I MUST have I find it interesting I use only one of those programs and am indescribably happy with my ubnutu experience ;p

Nythain
July 6th, 2007, 04:05 AM
do window managers count as apps... here we go

#1 fluxbox... anything else is just a toy
#2 midnight commander
#3 rtorrent
#4 Eterm
#5 Conky (replace with SuperKaramba if running a kde system)
#6 Firefox (default with ubuntu but not kubuntu, so its not a default app for me)
#7 mplayer, mplayer plugin for mozilla, and xine-ui ( i use xine to watch videos that are on my pc, and the mplayer plugin for watching videos and listening to mp3s in firefox)
#8 thats actually about it for programs i cant live without... i could also add to this list, CenterICQ
#9 mpd with ncmpc
#10 leafpad (for those times when you just dont want to deal with nano or vi

i no longer have a need for apps like kopete, k3b and amarok since i started using more cli ncurses apps like centericq, ncmpc, and the standard command line tools for cd ripping and iso burning

NeoLithium
July 6th, 2007, 04:12 AM
Beryl may want to be taken off, as it's merged into Compiz Fusion with Compiz, if it should be up there. however don't forget quite a few users can't use it to it's potential, so it's kind of an extra at the very very best. I do second rTorrent (Thank you Bodhi_Zazen for that), as well as conky (Works on KDE and Gnome just as easily) Mplayer is subjective with the codecs, I use totem still, with the proper codecs everything works; MPD is a great thing to have, along with a GUI app for it, such as Sonata (It's my fav) as well I have to throw Exaile in there. It's just plain great. Deluge is another one that should be in there, as well as Xchat! For the love of god include a simple irc client for new users! ;)

JAPrufrock
July 6th, 2007, 04:18 AM
Here's a list of extra apps that I have installed, i.e. that didn't come pre-installed with Ubuntu. Please note that I'm using Ubuntu's desktop, so I had to install some of the KDE apps that I like.

Tomboy notes
wine
KPDF
Scribus
Kget
Ktorrent
Java
Gnucash
K3b
Mplayer movie player
K9copy
RealPlayer
VirtualBox

I also prefer Ktorrent to Azureus, and K3b is great for copying CDs. K9copy is also great for copying DVDs

Istonian
July 6th, 2007, 04:29 AM
Definetely amaroK, K3b, mplayer plugin, thats all that comes to mind.

fuscia
July 6th, 2007, 04:32 AM
no browser, OP?

streamtuner/streamripper
audacious
epiphany
mplayer plugin
gimp
gedit
openbox
eog
nautilus, or thunar
gnome, or xfce4 terminal

revertex
July 6th, 2007, 04:38 AM
please change the title, it should be top ten software you need to avoid, and please put nero linux at the top of the list, it's just a plain crap.

beryl, > in development stage, soner or later will break in parts.

Azureus > full featured, resource hog, too many resources for most people, geared to uber geeks.

Avant Window Navigator > under development, may goes mad and eat your cpu

Banshee > in development, lack tons of features.

Filezilla > nautilus and konqueror does ftp out of the box.

nero linux > are you kidding?

The only application that i really recomend to people that starting using ubuntu is automatix, it's a shame that ubuntu don't come with automatix preinstalled, or even a link with instructions how to install it.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 02:31 PM
I'm not sure that Azureus is the best BT client for *nix. I usually use Deluge, although KTorrent is also a nice option for KDM users. I've always found Azureus way too clunky. Also, uTorrent works quite well through Wine.

EDIT: Also, I've always been fond of Zim for ToDo lists and organization, although BasKet and TomTom are popular choices as well.

I've not heard of Deluge before, I will definitely check it out! Does it have things like bandwidth control? I'm limited to 16k up, so if I let it go much higher than 6k, my net connection basically dies. :(

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 02:33 PM
no browser, OP?

No, because I use Firefox, and I excluded any software that came pre-installed with Ubuntu. Rest-assured, I use Firefox more than any application. ;)

OzzyFrank
July 6th, 2007, 02:36 PM
Off the top of my head, in no order of importance:

Inkscape (SVG graphics)
Opera (a browser that can save and open MHT web page archives)
Mailwasher Pro (running under Wine; must have spam filter that bounces back spam)
Kaffeine (the best DVD player)
Thunar (Nautilus has matured of late with addond but good to have another file manager like Thunar)
Gimp (certainly better than your average freeware graphics editor!)
OpenOffice Writer (stand up great to MS Word)
CD Player (call me weird, but I always preferred a minimalist approach to a CD player)
DVD Shrink (either the Linux version or the Windows one in Wine for dual- to single-layer)
Gnome Baker (a good burning suite)

I won't list things like Beryl, because as fun as they are, they are not programs as such, and hardly important. I won't list things like other desktop environments either, though I always install the Kubuntu desktop as well (when things go wrong in Gnome, KDE still works, so it is good for troubleshooting). I won't mention things that really are sort of part of the system, even though they are programs, like the file manager Nautilus (hated that in Edgy, but since I couldn't get changing the default to Thunar to stick in Feisty I have worked with both, and found that now Nautilus is OK with features like Thunar's, at least with addons).

Oh, and Gedit craps all over the standard Windows Notepad, with tabs and all.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 02:47 PM
I won't list things like Beryl, because as fun as they are, they are not programs as such, and hardly important.

See, I disagree. While definitely they are mostly eye-candy, they were important to me because:

1. They initially drew me to Ubuntu to try out. While I had obviously heard of it and watched it get more popular, seeing the Ubuntu + Beryl videos on YouTube finally convinced me to give Ubuntu a shot, and I've stuck with it now for 6 months, which is 5 months longer than any other Linux distro I've ever used (about five of them probably), and I don't think I'll be going back to Windows.

2. The feel of the windows that Beryl provided (wobble, etc) just made Windows XP feel wrong when I went back. That helped me to keep with Ubuntu.

3. I've NEVER used virtual desktops before. I thought they were stupid. It was such a pain to go down to the taskbar and try to figure out where I left whichever window I wanted to use, and I could never remember the keyboard shortcuts. With Beryl, I CONSTANTLY use virtual desktops now, simply because it is so easy to switch between them. That definitely has made me more productive! :)


Oh, and Gedit craps all over the standard Windows Notepad, with tabs and all.

No arguments there. :)

dptxp
July 6th, 2007, 02:49 PM
Beryl at #1? Admittedly, it's a very pretty window manager, but until it's stable and supported on a range of hardware, I don't think it's a "must have."

BERYL should be on 'Avoid it" list.

Nekiruhs
July 6th, 2007, 02:51 PM
Folding@Home (http://folding.stanford.edu/) - Donate your extra CPU cycles to help fight cancer

lazyart
July 6th, 2007, 03:00 PM
Do you have any recomendation to substitute my windows "wordpress" for i use in ubuntu? Seems so cool if we can modificating blog from ubuntu too.
Just use Wordpress in Linux. My website (http://www.randomations.com) is hosted on a Dapper LAMP installation-- in a virtual machine in on my desktop!

moredhel
July 6th, 2007, 03:02 PM
nautilus ftp isn't as good as filezilla - it doesn't have the features.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 03:02 PM
BERYL should be on 'Avoid it" list.

Always worked fine for me. I just installed it on my brother's computer last night, with no problems at all. :confused:

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 03:04 PM
nautilus ftp isn't as good as filezilla - it doesn't have the features.

I agree. And while Nautilus works much better as an FTP client than the Windows Explorer, neither of them can really substitute for a true, full-featured FTP client for anything more than casual work with an FTP server.

p_quarles
July 6th, 2007, 03:11 PM
Always worked fine for me. I just installed it on my brother's computer last night, with no problems at all. :confused:
That's part of the problem. It works smoothly on a few systems. Like I said, it's pretty, but it's not a "must have" in any sense. Customizing the Gnome desktop switcher to work the way you want it is much easier, and much more likely to work on anyone's system.

LaRoza
July 6th, 2007, 03:15 PM
1. G++
2. Python-tk
3. Abiword
4. Frozen Bubble

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 03:37 PM
That's part of the problem. It works smoothly on a few systems. Like I said, it's pretty, but it's not a "must have" in any sense. Customizing the Gnome desktop switcher to work the way you want it is much easier, and much more likely to work on anyone's system.

Fair enough, but all I know is that if it hadn't been for Beryl, I:

1. Likely would not have tried Ubuntu.

2. Likely would not have stuck with Ubuntu (since using Windows XP without Beryl's effects just felt wrong to me).

So, for me, it is a must-have. :)

altgrrr
July 6th, 2007, 03:53 PM
Didn't really read all the posts, but what do you think about free-software regarding your list? Is that of importance to you?

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 05:03 PM
Didn't really read all the posts, but what do you think about free-software regarding your list? Is that of importance to you?

Not especially. I use what works. Most of the items on my list (all of them with the exception of Nero I think?) are open, which is no surprise since there isn't exactly a lot of commercial closed software for Linux. If something came along that worked better, but was closed, I would certainly consider it. Obviously the value has to be there, so if it is an IM client (not super high priority to me) for $100 that works better than Pidgin, obviously I'm sticking with Pidgin.

So in summary, it isn't really much of a factor for or against my decision.

k33bz
July 6th, 2007, 05:28 PM
I would have to disagree with you on this list. Beryl is still to unstable to use, and nero linux, i have it installed (demo only), dont like it to much so i will stick with gnomebaker. as far as your arcade game, not my style, but to each his own on that one, i just wont use banshee, i have several other i use, depending on my mood. my P2P client is Limewire, and ya i knos it aint 100% stable, but it is what i love. Pidgin and Firezilla are the only two i will agree with you on at the moment. I never used Screenlets, but i will give it a try and see. nvm about screenlets, i wont use beryl

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 06:08 PM
Yeah, I guess I didn't know so many people had trouble with Beryl. It has never given me any trouble, but I've only used it with newer NVIDIA cards, so maybe older ones, or ATI/Intel give people trouble. :(

I'm a huge fan of Nero now, I think Ahead did a great job bringing it over to Linux. Definitely worth the relatively small price. I don't do much P2P stuff, I needed a Torrent application because that is how I prefer to download files, when the option is available. I would *LOVE* to see uTorrent on Linux, because I think the UI is better than Azureus, and it seems a lot lighter; however, without uTorrent, Azureus works fine for now.

And come on, no love for Grid Wars?! ;)

milen243
July 6th, 2007, 06:16 PM
For those who are not sure why you might need Nero I recommend to try and burn a 8GB mkv file on a DVD-DL with a UDF filesystem. You can't do that with k3b.

p_quarles
July 6th, 2007, 06:23 PM
For those who are not sure why you might need Nero I recommend to try and burn a 8GB mkv file on a DVD-DL with a UDF filesystem. You can't do that with k3b.
I haven't tried burning one, but it seems that Gnomebaker supports dual-layer DVDs.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 06:35 PM
I think I read that Nero is the only one that supports HD-DVDs and BLU-Ray DVDs at present (though that could be, and probably is, wrong).

Not that anyone can afford the burners or media for either of those formats yet... :)

k33bz
July 6th, 2007, 07:00 PM
Ya I had plenty of troubles with Beryl when I was running Edgy, so now that I am running Fiesty I refuse to install Beryl until it is stable. I do not know about HD-DVDs or even Blu-Ray discs, but gnomebaker does have support for dual-layer DVDs.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 07:23 PM
Ya I had plenty of troubles with Beryl when I was running Edgy, so now that I am running Fiesty I refuse to install Beryl until it is stable. I do not know about HD-DVDs or even Blu-Ray discs, but gnomebaker does have support for dual-layer DVDs.

Only problem I had was that updating from Edgy to Feisty, something happened with the NVIDIA drivers and I lost X. I got that worked out, and haven't had any trouble since then.

Hopefully now that Beryl and Compiz have merged back, it will make getting a standard and stable system a reality. :)

kevinlyfellow
July 6th, 2007, 09:08 PM
I use very few of the 'must havess' in your list. Its funny how needs differ.

Mine are (in particular order):
1) Compiz -- Included
2) xine (xine-gui to be exact)
3) Rhythmbox -- Included
4) Tomboy -- Included
5) Celestia
6) Audio Tag Tool
7) Vorbis Gain
8) d4x
9) Octave and gnuplot
10) Firefox -- Included

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 09:08 PM
I haven't tried burning one, but it seems that Gnomebaker supports dual-layer DVDs.

That's cool. I wish dual-layer DVDs were a bit more affordable; they never really came down in price like single-layer DVD-Rs. :(

dylan623
July 6th, 2007, 09:21 PM
Wow, you don't really seem to care about Free Software, do you? If RMS knew...

smoker
July 6th, 2007, 09:26 PM
standard ubuntu mostly does me, with the addition of virtualbox.

bclark
July 6th, 2007, 09:35 PM
Oh, and Gedit craps all over the standard Windows Notepad, with tabs and all.

Oh hell yeah, but I do have to say I really like Notepad++ (http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm) on Windows

p_quarles
July 6th, 2007, 09:42 PM
Oh hell yeah, but I do have to say I really like Notepad++ (http://notepad-plus.sourceforge.net/uk/site.htm) on Windows
Notepad++ is great. I keep the portable version on a USB drive and this has worked out great. I'm pretty sure that Notepad++ is just a Windows port of Gedit, though.

eternalsword
July 6th, 2007, 10:10 PM
Notepad++ is great. I keep the portable version on a USB drive and this has worked out great. I'm pretty sure that Notepad++ is just a Windows port of Gedit, though.

Notepad++ is most definitely not based on Gedit, it uses scintilla and is more comparable to SciTE, though I prefer Notepad++ on Windows. I am yet to find a killer text editor for linux. I know vi is really powerful, but I don't really want to remember 50 keystrokes to do what I need. My problem with the gui text editors is that any left click clears the selection buffer. I have no idea why they did that. So right now, I'm using nano for any files that I have to do alot of pasting.

Anyways, my list of ten must haves (in no particular order) that aren't included by default, I would say

1) mplayer (including mencoder)
2) xmms2 (I don't count third party clients separate)
3) zsh
4) deluge (svn version, the one in the repos is crappy)
5) xchat
6) fluxbox (with peksystray so I can restart fluxbox without losing my systray)
7) conky
8 ) gkrellm2
9) tilda (has some issues on feisty with shells other than bash or sh, but is a really great terminal nonetheless)
10) thunderbird 2 (I'll replace this with something else, once thunderbird 2 replaces thunderbird in the repos)

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 10:11 PM
Wow, you don't really seem to care about Free Software, do you? If RMS knew...

Everyone is free to choose their own license. If your software best suits my needs (and price is always a factor), I'll be happy to use your software, closed or open-source. I wouldn't dare dictate to someone that they MUST use an open-source license, just as I wouldn't dictate to someone that they MUST use a closed-source license.

Everyone is free to choose. That's what makes this such a great world.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 10:13 PM
I use very few of the 'must havess' in your list. Its funny how needs differ...

Certainly! And I'm glad so many people are posting their "must have" lists! Very interesting to see what is important to people, and also get some new ideas for applications to try (I'm going to check out "Deluge" myself when I get home). :)

p_quarles
July 6th, 2007, 10:16 PM
Notepad++ is most definitely not based on Gedit, it uses scintilla and is more comparable to SciTE, though I prefer Notepad++ on Windows. I am yet to find a killer text editor for linux. I know vi is really powerful, but I don't really want to remember 50 keystrokes to do what I need. My problem with the gui text editors is that any left click clears the selection buffer. I have no idea why they did that. So right now, I'm using nano for any files that I have to do alot of pasting.

I stand corrected :-)

Does Emacs clear the buffer on left-click? I haven't used it enough to know, but I would be surprised if it did. Anyway, I mostly use editors for .html, and Gedit and Vim are more than adequate for that.

UnixAnt
July 6th, 2007, 10:21 PM
Mine would probably consist of:

1) ksh is the first thing I add post-install, as I am not a bash lover at all.

The rest would consist of:

2) deluge
3) exaile
4) vlc
5) pan
6) pidgin
7) conky
8) thunderbird with spamato + enigmail pgp
9) grip
10) irssi

As for text editors, you really have to go a long way to beat vi. Once you know the key strokes, text just seems to manipulate itself. I can do far more in vi than I can in gedit, notepad, editpad or any other gui-based text editor.

And yes, its incredibly interesting to build up a profile of people's requirements and favourites :D

p_quarles
July 6th, 2007, 10:24 PM
Oh dear. References to Emacs and Vi in subsequent posts. I don't like where this is going. :0

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 10:30 PM
Oh dear. References to Emacs and Vi in subsequent posts. I don't like where this is going. :0

Hehe, oh, no one will start a petty fight over which editor is better...

...

:popcorn:

UnixAnt
July 6th, 2007, 10:38 PM
Nope - I promise not to veer wildly off-topic with a vi vs emacs debate ;)

However, I will hold my hands up and say, as a vi user, I believe emacs is potentially more powerful than vi - I've just personally, to my shame, never taken the time to learn it. Believe it or not I have come across *nix boxes in the past which didn't have emacs installed. Each and every box I have ever worked on has always had vi installed. I just selected one of the 2 and learned the commands :D

kittyhawk63
July 6th, 2007, 10:46 PM
Yeah, really tough call. As nice as K3B is, I do think that Nero is a bit more polished, and I seem to have a bit more success with it. Certainly, if you don't want to shell out the $30 for Nero, K3B is not going to be a disappointment. :)

I had a problem with some CDs not wanting to burn and Nero or k3b could not help. I downloaded "imgburn" and it did the trick. So, it is another alternative worth looking into. (Freeware)
kh

eternalsword
July 6th, 2007, 10:52 PM
for anyone whose got two machines and no router (or one to many machines for a router to handle), with at least one of the machines running ubuntu, then buying a second nic for the ubuntu machine and running ubuntu-firewall (not available in the repos) will give a nice cheap router. So in that scenario, ubuntu-firewall would crack my top ten.

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 10:55 PM
I had a problem with some CDs not wanting to burn and Nero or k3b could not help. I downloaded "imgburn" and it did the trick. So, it is another alternative worth looking into. (Freeware)
kh

Hoorah for choices. :)

Hexydes
July 6th, 2007, 11:20 PM
for anyone whose got two machines and no router (or one to many machines for a router to handle), with at least one of the machines running ubuntu, then buying a second nic for the ubuntu machine and running ubuntu-firewall (not available in the repos) will give a nice cheap router. So in that scenario, ubuntu-firewall would crack my top ten.

Very cool idea! I have a hardware router with a firewall, but this is definitely a cool idea!

OzzyFrank
July 6th, 2007, 11:42 PM
Don't get me wrong, I think Beryl is great, and has its place as far as being good enough to woo some Windows users who think Vista looks impressive. But I still stand by saying Beryl is hardly "important" in the true sense of the word. I mean this as a personal opinion, though have to be honest and say I can't understand the importance many place on it (like when swearing they will leave Ubuntu if they can't get Beryl running). Also, Beryl might be software as such, but it's hardly a "program", as in something you use to achieve a goal.

So yes, Beryl is cool, but not the reason for having an OS.

cwmoser
July 7th, 2007, 01:41 AM
Ya I had plenty of troubles with Beryl when I was running Edgy, so now that I am running Fiesty I refuse to install Beryl until it is stable. I do not know about HD-DVDs or even Blu-Ray discs, but gnomebaker does have support for dual-layer DVDs.


We must have very different experiences. I have found Beryl to be extremely stable and useful -- hey it never crashes. I have Beryl on my desktop using an nVidia 6250 and dual monitors; and on my laptop which is an Intel i810. I've heard that ATI video cards are a bear but that is because of the sorry ATI video drivers and not a Beryl problem.

Carl

Hexydes
July 7th, 2007, 03:34 AM
We must have very different experiences. I have found Beryl to be extremely stable and useful -- hey it never crashes. I have Beryl on my desktop using an nVidia 6250 and dual monitors; and on my laptop which is an Intel i810. I've heard that ATI video cards are a bear but that is because of the sorry ATI video drivers and not a Beryl problem.

Carl

Yeah, I've heard the same thing. I'd like to say AMD is going to help that situation out, but I haven't seen any evidence thus far...

k33bz
July 7th, 2007, 04:21 AM
Only problem I had was that updating from Edgy to Feisty, something happened with the NVIDIA drivers and I lost X. I got that worked out, and haven't had any trouble since then.

Hopefully now that Beryl and Compiz have merged back, it will make getting a standard and stable system a reality. :)

i had that problem too, had to go do a clean install instead

dylan623
July 7th, 2007, 05:11 AM
Everyone is free to choose their own license. If your software best suits my needs (and price is always a factor), I'll be happy to use your software, closed or open-source. I wouldn't dare dictate to someone that they MUST use an open-source license, just as I wouldn't dictate to someone that they MUST use a closed-source license.

Everyone is free to choose. That's what makes this such a great world.

Free to lose your freedom. By using proprietary software you give up your freedom. Please don't call it Open Source either, the correct term is Free Software. I mean, you're already using GNU/Linux, why give up your freedom now? Having both "Open Source" and proprietary software does NOT make this a great world, Free Software does.

Madpilot
July 7th, 2007, 05:45 AM
An attempt to drag this, kicking and screaming, back on-topic... my 'Top 10 Things Ubuntu Doesn't Come With By Default':

1. Opera. (Nonfree, I know, but I've been using it before Firefox even existed.)
2. XChat (Ubuntu used to ship with this. It still should. Best IRC client going.)
3. Screem and Bluefish (both HTML/CSS/other language editors, both with nice features. I switch back and forth randomly)
4. Inkscape
5. gLabels
6. Agave (neat little colour palette/colour scheme generator)
7. Deluge-torrent (looking forward to this being in the repos; the .deb is stable, though)
8. EasyTag (id3 tag editor for mp3/ogg/flac/etc. Crazy powerful)
9. Filezilla (so, so happy to see this out for Linux & in repos finally! Was the only Windows app I really missed!)
10. Muine (nice, simple little music player. Rythymbox's UI is un-usable)
Honourable mention:
11. Enemy Territory (non-free, but sometimes you just have to play violent, anti-social FPS games)

Stuff that is now default, and used to be on the must-install list:
- Tomboy
- gThumb
- Baobab (Gnome Disc Usage Analyzer, it's now called)

Oh, and both "Open Source" and "Free Software" can be correct terminology, depending on the situation. But arguing about the difference makes you sound like you lack a proper social life, frankly.

dylan623
July 7th, 2007, 06:24 AM
An attempt to drag this, kicking and screaming, back on-topic... my 'Top 10 Things Ubuntu Doesn't Come With By Default':

1. Opera. (Nonfree, I know, but I've been using it before Firefox even existed.)
2. XChat (Ubuntu used to ship with this. It still should. Best IRC client going.)
3. Screem and Bluefish (both HTML/CSS/other language editors, both with nice features. I switch back and forth randomly)
4. Inkscape
5. gLabels
6. Agave (neat little colour palette/colour scheme generator)
7. Deluge-torrent (looking forward to this being in the repos; the .deb is stable, though)
8. EasyTag (id3 tag editor for mp3/ogg/flac/etc. Crazy powerful)
9. Filezilla (so, so happy to see this out for Linux & in repos finally! Was the only Windows app I really missed!)
10. Muine (nice, simple little music player. Rythymbox's UI is un-usable)
Honourable mention:
11. Enemy Territory (non-free, but sometimes you just have to play violent, anti-social FPS games)

Stuff that is now default, and used to be on the must-install list:
- Tomboy
- gThumb
- Baobab (Gnome Disc Usage Analyzer, it's now called)

Oh, and both "Open Source" and "Free Software" can be correct terminology, depending on the situation. But arguing about the difference makes you sound like you lack a proper social life, frankly.

Open Source should only be used when speaking about the OSI or other suitable times. What is this "social life" of which you speak?

Artemis3
July 8th, 2007, 02:56 PM
Yeah, I guess I didn't know so many people had trouble with Beryl. It has never given me any trouble, but I've only used it with newer NVIDIA cards, so maybe older ones, or ATI/Intel give people trouble. :(

I'm a huge fan of Nero now, I think Ahead did a great job bringing it over to Linux. Definitely worth the relatively small price. I don't do much P2P stuff, I needed a Torrent application because that is how I prefer to download files, when the option is available. I would *LOVE* to see uTorrent on Linux, because I think the UI is better than Azureus, and it seems a lot lighter; however, without uTorrent, Azureus works fine for now.

Actually it is the other way around. Leaving known small Beryl bugs aside; people using proprietary drivers are the ones suffering. If you try the composite desktop managers with open / free drivers you know they work perfectly, and that means intel gma and ati up to radeon 9500 works perfect. On the other hand, i saw graphic glitches with the nvidia 6100 using ubuntu (feisty) stock driver.

It is also important for you to understand that beryl as a project is dead, and that you should uninstall it and instead use compiz-fusion. You can get information here (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=481314) on how to install it with feisty.

I also use Azureus because its feature rich; and k3b for burning (tried nero, sucks). For a light music player, that would be audacious: just what xmms used to be, but current. Violent games? Ever tried tremulous? ;)

Rohen
July 8th, 2007, 11:24 PM
TOP 10 Software I use on a daily basis:

1. Firefox
2. Evolution
3. Pidgin
4. Skype
5. Quanta
6. Gimp or Inkscape
7. VLC Media Player
8. OpenOffice
9. Listen Music Player
10.KTorrent

:popcorn:

nexx
July 9th, 2007, 12:53 AM
I like Liferea very much for news reading,
PeerTV 0.4-beta.2 and mplayer for tv
streamtuner, streamripper and xmms for radio even when the wifi is not very strong (other players just seem to fail when the wifi signal goes down in power)
for doing websites I have all kind of soft but use mainly gedit with some plugins
wallpaper tray for viewing my photo colection
gtk-gnutella and qbittorrent for downloading

Hexydes
July 9th, 2007, 02:48 PM
It is also important for you to understand that beryl as a project is dead, and that you should uninstall it and instead use compiz-fusion. You can get information here (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=481314) on how to install it with feisty.

It was my understanding that Compiz-Fusion is very, very alpha still, much more so than the last version of Beryl, and that if you're not willing or able to constantly work at fixing it, that Beryl is the better alternative for the moment (especially on the x64 platform, which I'm on). Is that not the case?

aesthete
July 9th, 2007, 03:19 PM
Hey hexydes, I know you've spawn some debate on whether or not such software are 'must-haves' in ubuntu, but I am an intensely visual person so I agree with you on most counts. In fact, I'm really fussy with how everything looks, so I thank you for letting me know of the Avant Window Manager (I was searching for something like this for months, and the steadfast friend I have helping me with all this new ubuntu stuff isn't so visual as I am). P.S. those screenshots look sexy.

While I don't think beryl is important in terms of usefulness, it's what really drew me into ubuntu as well. It looks good, and as soon as Compiz is stable, well, I can't wait to try that.

Hexydes
July 9th, 2007, 03:24 PM
Hey hexydes, I know you've spawn some debate on whether or not such software are 'must-haves' in ubuntu, but I am an intensely visual person so I agree with you on most counts. In fact, I'm really fussy with how everything looks, so I thank you for letting me know of the Avant Window Manager (I was searching for something like this for months, and the steadfast friend I have helping me with all this new ubuntu stuff isn't so visual as I am). P.S. those screenshots look sexy.

While I don't think beryl is important in terms of usefulness, it's what really drew me into ubuntu as well. It looks good, and as soon as Compiz is stable, well, I can't wait to try that.

Absolutely, and I am just the same way! Obviously, to someone who isn't as visual-oriented, much of what is in Beryl/Compiz wouldn't be overly important, but for me, it was the best add-on because it was both attractive and useful, at least to me.

I had been using something before AWN (I'm thinking...kiba-dock maybe; is that something?), but it completely broke somehow, and I could never get it working again. I tried AWN, and it was 95% as good, and even better, didn't crash and corrupt itself, so I've been happily using it for a few months now. :)

Glad you like the screenshots, I've tweaked my system quite a bit to get it just the way that I like it. :)

moredhel
July 10th, 2007, 12:31 PM
It was my understanding that Compiz-Fusion is very, very alpha still, much more so than the last version of Beryl, and that if you're not willing or able to constantly work at fixing it, that Beryl is the better alternative for the moment (especially on the x64 platform, which I'm on). Is that not the case?

Well i've used both lots, and i find that compiz-fusion is basically no more unstable than beryl. But that's just my personal experience.

hyper_ch
July 10th, 2007, 12:36 PM
My number one would be openssh-server --> so I can get anytime a connection to my computer...

UnixAnt
July 10th, 2007, 12:59 PM
My number one would be openssh-server --> so I can get anytime a connection to my computer...

Ha! That's actually a very good point! Some of the software I use all the time I simply take for granted, such as openssh-server. I would definitely add that to my list.

Off Topic:
BTW, Moredhel, your handle implies that you are a Betrayal at Krondor fan - this true? :D
/Off Topic

AndyCooll
July 10th, 2007, 01:05 PM
My list of stuff that I use that isn't installed by default is:

openssh-server - the very first thing I install
nfs-common
mplayer-mozilla plugin - I've never got the Totem plugin to work so I use this instead.
the various extra codecs
Amarok - still head and shoulders above anything else
Liferea _ Best RSS feed app around.
Azureus - I prefer this to the other alternatives out there.
Apollon - gnutellla, fasttrack, ares, openft all in one.
Xchat - though I don't use IRC very often, I always install this
Revelation password manager - for storing all my passwords
Easytag - I've had problems with the latest version of this not updating large batches of tags properly so I've recently started using Tag Tools instead. It's a fine alternative, but this would still be my preferred choice.
Wine - For my FM game.

:cool:

cwmoser
July 10th, 2007, 01:30 PM
It was my understanding that Compiz-Fusion is very, very alpha still, much more so than the last version of Beryl, and that if you're not willing or able to constantly work at fixing it, that Beryl is the better alternative for the moment (especially on the x64 platform, which I'm on). Is that not the case?

I find that Beryl is extremely stable now. It is version 0.2.0 rc3 and few updates are occurring now.
I would highly recommend Beryl for those who have nVidia video cards, and cavent emptor to those who have ATI video cards.

Beryl ranks very high on my Top Ten list. Even though Beryl is "eye candy", it is ergonomic in that it makes sense the way humans visualize work spaces -- i.e. which side of the cube work surface did you leave your work. I often have one side of the Beryl cube for my email and browser, another for a vmware virtualization, another for Open Office, and another for programming using Monodevelop. You can easily go to the Beryl console and change the number of surfaces to 2, 4, 8, or whatever. One neat one is 2 surfaces where you flip the Beryl surface from the front to the back. Its obvious I like Beryl.

Carl

Hexydes
July 10th, 2007, 02:56 PM
I find that Beryl is extremely stable now. It is version 0.2.0 rc3 and few updates are occurring now.
I would highly recommend Beryl for those who have nVidia video cards, and cavent emptor to those who have ATI video cards.

Beryl ranks very high on my Top Ten list. Even though Beryl is "eye candy", it is ergonomic in that it makes sense the way humans visualize work spaces -- i.e. which side of the cube work surface did you leave your work. I often have one side of the Beryl cube for my email and browser, another for a vmware virtualization, another for Open Office, and another for programming using Monodevelop. You can easily go to the Beryl console and change the number of surfaces to 2, 4, 8, or whatever. One neat one is 2 surfaces where you flip the Beryl surface from the front to the back. Its obvious I like Beryl.

Carl

That is EXACTLY how I use my workspaces. :)

moredhel
July 10th, 2007, 04:39 PM
Off Topic:
BTW, Moredhel, your handle implies that you are a Betrayal at Krondor fan - this true? :D
/Off Topic

No, actually I made moredhel out of the back of the silmarillion. Elvish. :P

But since as it was taken, for that reason, I now use faemir :)

is it any good by any chance? :P

ITdrummer
July 10th, 2007, 04:41 PM
What is the easiest way to install beryl? Im sure there are several ways, but since there are experienced beryl users in this thread, i figured i would ask. My video driver is: Intel Corporation 82845G/GL[Brookdale-G]/GE Chipset Integrated Graphics Device (rev 03)

Will beryl work ok on my machine?

P4 2.2 Ghz
512 Mb ram

tgm4883
July 10th, 2007, 04:52 PM
I don't know why, but after visiting your site I now have a folder in my home directory named hexydes. Whats that all about?

AusIV4
July 10th, 2007, 04:52 PM
Here's my list of important applications. Sometimes I use Gnome, sometimes I use KDE, so some of these applications are included with one but not both.

Firefox
openssh
amarok (and libxine-extracodecs)
k3b
beryl (Say what you will, I haven't had stability issues since the really early releases)
MythTV Frontend (I have a backend on one PC)
synergy (makes using multiple computers so much easier)
tomboy notes
gaim
gnucash

Hexydes
July 11th, 2007, 02:48 PM
I don't know why, but after visiting your site I now have a folder in my home directory named hexydes. Whats that all about?

No idea. If you find out why, let me know! :)

Hexydes
July 11th, 2007, 02:50 PM
What is the easiest way to install beryl? Im sure there are several ways, but since there are experienced beryl users in this thread, i figured i would ask. My video driver is: Intel Corporation 82845G/GL[Brookdale-G]/GE Chipset Integrated Graphics Device (rev 03)

Will beryl work ok on my machine?

P4 2.2 Ghz
512 Mb ram

This is purely speculation, but since the Intel graphics chipset is tied to your computer's system memory, and you only have 512MB of RAM, that could possibly cause an issue if you happen to be running other applications that are taking up a lot of memory. I don't think Beryl would have any trouble just running on the desktop, but if you get things like OpenOffice.org, Firefox with lots of tabs, and Azureus opened up, you might see a performance hit?

thespinesplitter
July 12th, 2007, 06:07 PM
Yeah, really tough call. As nice as K3B is, I do think that Nero is a bit more polished, and I seem to have a bit more success with it. Certainly, if you don't want to shell out the $30 for Nero, K3B is not going to be a disappointment. :)


you're missing the entire point of open source, you dont need nero "at all" under linux, polished or not the point is not paying anything for it

mike102282
July 12th, 2007, 06:11 PM
you're missing the entire point of open source, you dont need nero "at all" under linux, polished or not the point is not paying anything for it


What Linux doesn't mean free as in no money involved it means free as anyone can do what ever they want to do with it. i.e. modify, distribute

thespinesplitter
July 12th, 2007, 07:01 PM
im aware ( i code ) but still, why pay when theres FOSS, generally thats what its all about

mike102282
July 12th, 2007, 08:18 PM
im aware ( i code ) but still, why pay when theres FOSS, generally thats what its all about


I agree I wouldn't pay for anything that I could get for free. I think k3B is great.

qamelian
July 12th, 2007, 08:25 PM
you're missing the entire point of open source, you dont need nero "at all" under linux, polished or not the point is not paying anything for it

Sorry, but I do need Nero. Unless I've been missing something in the past several years, there is no easy way to burn discs that use sub-channel data using any of the existing apps for Linux. Nero does this, so until I can find a way to do this with open open source tools, Nero is an essential for me. This is not negotiable.

hackle577
July 12th, 2007, 08:34 PM
But arguing about the difference makes you sound like you lack a proper social life, frankly.

A social life, neat! Where can I download one?

tgm4883
July 12th, 2007, 10:03 PM
A social life, neat! Where can I download one?

You could try http://www.secondlife.com/.

Although if your brave enough (I think it's still in development) you could try http://www.getafirstlife.com/

silent1643
July 13th, 2007, 06:48 PM
1. firefox
2. thunderbird
3. gimp
4. gaim/pidgin
5. alltray
6. fish
7. conky
8. gftp
9. wine
10. dreamweaver

guess im a little to main stream on the open source, but its a family computer also :D
& of course gnome

mike102282
July 13th, 2007, 06:51 PM
1. firefox
2. thunderbird
3. gimp
4. gaim/pidgin
5. alltray
6. fish
7. conky
8. gftp
9. wine
10. dreamweaver

guess im a little to main stream on the open source, but its a family computer also :D
& of course gnome


What is alltray?

silent1643
July 13th, 2007, 06:54 PM
What is alltray?

http://www.littleubuntu.com/blog/?p=15

mike102282
July 13th, 2007, 07:00 PM
http://www.littleubuntu.com/blog/?p=15

I would have to agree that is a great app!

wpshooter
July 13th, 2007, 07:07 PM
Dear Poster:

I consider the things in your list more utilities and some play stuff as opposed to what I call software applications, like - Peachtree Accounting, Quickbooks, CCH Prosystem Tax, Sage FAS100 Fixed Asset/Depreciation software, CPAS CPM time & billing software, Creative Solutions accounting software, etc, etc. and the listing can go on and on in the business software area and many other areas of endeavor. The things you have listed may or may not be needed to run an O/S, but in my opinion you will never be able to make a living/profit with them.

P. S. - Please do not refer me to WINE.

Thanks.

xc3RnbFO8P
July 13th, 2007, 07:12 PM
1. Firefox
2. Kaffeine ( digital tv record mpeg ts)
3. Devede (change mpeg ts to mpeg)
4. Avidemux ( to change mpeg to xvid)
5. K3b
6. Thunderbird
7. Kopete
8. Openoffice
9. VLC
10. xmms

mike102282
July 13th, 2007, 07:19 PM
1. Firefox
2. Thunderbird
3. Pidgin
4. Moneydance
5. K3B

crimesaucer
July 13th, 2007, 07:19 PM
I would add these also:


Swiftweasel: http://swiftweasel.sourceforge.net/

Exaile!: http://www.exaile.org/

Xine ui: http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Feisty#How_to_install_Multimedia_Player_.28 xine-ui_with_DVD_menus_support.29

Grip: http://nostatic.org/grip/

File Roller: http://fileroller.sourceforge.net/

Wifi Radar: http://wifi-radar.systemimager.org/

mike102282
July 13th, 2007, 07:22 PM
I would add these also:


Swiftweasel: http://swiftweasel.sourceforge.net/

Exaile!: http://www.exaile.org/

Xine ui: http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Feisty#How_to_install_Multimedia_Player_.28 xine-ui_with_DVD_menus_support.29

Grip: http://nostatic.org/grip/

File Roller: http://fileroller.sourceforge.net/

Wifi Radar: http://wifi-radar.systemimager.org/

I agree with Xine ui

dan171717
July 13th, 2007, 07:27 PM
This is purely speculation, but since the Intel graphics chipset is tied to your computer's system memory, and you only have 512MB of RAM, that could possibly cause an issue if you happen to be running other applications that are taking up a lot of memory. I don't think Beryl would have any trouble just running on the desktop, but if you get things like OpenOffice.org, Firefox with lots of tabs, and Azureus opened up, you might see a performance hit?

i run beryl with


1.4ghz celeron m
768mb ram
intel extreme 2

and it is fine!

crimesaucer
July 13th, 2007, 07:33 PM
i run beryl with


1.4ghz celeron m
768mb ram
intel extreme 2

and it is fine!

I have an intel 1.6ghz celeron m w/512mb ram...and Compiz Fusion is running perfectly on my xubuntu 7.04.

So did Beryl for the last 8 months.

...just don't use all of the unnecessary plug-ins that slow things down.

dan171717
July 13th, 2007, 07:33 PM
1.beryl
2.both kde and gnome
3.k3b
4.amorok
5.nibbles (I LOVE THAT GAME)
6.tremulous
7.automatix
8.ndiswrapper
9.virtualbox or vmware server
10.gdesklets

not in any order

peebly
July 13th, 2007, 07:36 PM
Free to lose your freedom. By using proprietary software you give up your freedom. Please don't call it Open Source either, the correct term is Free Software. I mean, you're already using GNU/Linux, why give up your freedom now? Having both "Open Source" and proprietary software does NOT make this a great world, Free Software does.

Sorry to disappoint you but, I don't use Ubuntu because it is free.

I use it because it works for me and would pay for it if it was not free.

Open source, proprietary, freeware what ever. People pick software for there needs.

Example, which has been pointed out by a few people Nero Linux, I use it, payed for it and think its the best cd/dvd burning app for Linux.

I don't think I am giving up my freedom by using pay for applications on a OS which you can get for free.

Hexydes
July 13th, 2007, 08:52 PM
I have an intel 1.6ghz celeron m w/512mb ram...and Compiz Fusion is running perfectly on my xubuntu 7.04.

So did Beryl for the last 8 months.

...just don't use all of the unnecessary plug-ins that slow things down.

Looks like two reports so far that it works. Sounds like it should work pretty well. :)

wildseven
July 13th, 2007, 08:55 PM
Everything in the BackTrack 2 security suite. This way I just need one distro and not have to switch back and forth( which isn't too much of a hassle. If I am doing anything security-wise, I am usually mobile so Ubuntu doesn't even load.) Sure I can install it on my own, but if it came with ubuntu it would be nice.

tgm4883
July 13th, 2007, 09:22 PM
Looks like two reports so far that it works. Sounds like it should work pretty well. :)

Third,

I have compiz fusion (remerge of beryl and compiz) installed on my Inspiron E1505 Laptop with an Intel 945GM and 512 MB Ram.

Despite the occasional bug due to compiz fusion being under development, it works great.

Ptero-4
July 14th, 2007, 01:28 AM
My list of things I use that aren't included:

Epiphany (integrates better than firefox)
Deluge
Gnome office (lighter than OO.org)
Gtk-gnutella
Sheepshaver (to run my stack of Mac apps)
Thunar
Brasero
aMSN (for when someone else wants a quick login to M$N)
Alltray
LeafPad

tcoffeep
July 14th, 2007, 01:55 AM
Beryl

Using ATI, I have alot of trouble running this program, so it's not exactly a 'must-have' in my books...I prefer just fooling around with gnome-look.org.


Azureus

From what I've heard, this is a very big and clunky p2p client. I prefer using Deluge when I'm in GNOME, and KTorrent in KDE.


Avant Window Navigator

I find what comes default with Ubuntu is better, to be honest :)


Banshee Music Player

I actually prefer to use VLC. It runs smoother, and whatnot.


Filezilla

I have no problem with Filezilla.


Nero Linux

I'm actually Anti-Nero due to my experience with Nero on windows. I actually prefer to use Gnomebaker, and
Serpentine.


Pidgin

PIDGIN ROCKS MY SOCKS!


k9copy

I don't own DVDs, so I am not for or against.


Grid Wars

Because of this list, I'll try this game :)


Screenlets

I had trouble installing these in my first week of Ubuntu, so I swore against attempting, but I'll try it now.

All in all, good list for a beginner. At least enough to get them started with Ubuntu. A couple weeks in, they might find better and/or worse programs.

yuvlevental
July 14th, 2007, 04:54 PM
Nice list. I thought GAIM was the best IM client, but I was wrong, I guess. Do screenlets require a composite enviroment such as beryl? And where did you get the wallpaper?

mike102282
July 14th, 2007, 08:40 PM
Nice list. I thought GAIM was the best IM client, but I was wrong, I guess. Do screenlets require a composite enviroment such as beryl? And where did you get the wallpaper?

Pidgin is the newer version of GAIM the changed there name.

Rohen
July 15th, 2007, 01:17 AM
Just over a week since I last posted here and I have changed the software I use a couple of times. That's normal, if you want to find what works and what doesn't. I tried lots of HTML editors until I found Quanta.

Maybe I'll find something to replace Evolution. It's been driving me nuts when I write reminder notes. Unfortunately it doesn't have the undo and redo options... I've lost a good number of phone numbers and addresses this way. :mad:

tcoffeep
July 15th, 2007, 01:54 AM
What about Thunderbird?

I've heard it's better than Evolution...but that's only hearsay...

mike102282
July 15th, 2007, 01:59 AM
What about Thunderbird?

I've heard it's better than Evolution...but that's only hearsay...

I think its a lot better, but that's just my opinion.

Hexydes
July 15th, 2007, 05:26 AM
Nice list. I thought GAIM was the best IM client, but I was wrong, I guess. Do screenlets require a composite enviroment such as beryl? And where did you get the wallpaper?

Well GAIM (due to trademark issues with AOL IM) renamed and re-branded itself as "Pidgin", so chances are, if you liked GAIM, you'll love Pidgin (I know I do). :)

Yes, the screenlets require a compositing environment. I use Beryl.

The wallpaper is called "Prime II" by someone named "Boss019", and it is VERY cool. You can grab it from:

http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/28271281

Hexydes
July 15th, 2007, 05:29 AM
What about Thunderbird?

I've heard it's better than Evolution...but that's only hearsay...

The VERY little I have used Evolution, I prefer Thunderbird. I think more than anything, it is just consistent with Firefox (obviously), so I have some level of familiarity there. I know, a very superficial reason, but there we are.

I left Thunderbird off my list because, as cool as it is, and as well as it works, I just don't use a mail client anymore. Everything I do for that is web-based, so I rarely use it for anything (though I have done a good job of getting many people off of Outlook and onto Thunderbird). :)

silent1643
July 16th, 2007, 12:41 PM
based on user comments from this thread - here are the results i came up with
http://www.littleubuntu.com/blog/?p=35

gb7055
July 16th, 2007, 01:34 PM
Not in any order.

1. Firefox
2. Evolution
3. Pidgin
4. Liferea
5. Amorok
6. GQview
7. Tvtime
8. Pan
9. Gnomebaker
10. Mplayer

Hexydes
July 16th, 2007, 03:22 PM
based on user comments from this thread - here are the results i came up with
http://www.littleubuntu.com/blog/?p=35

Neat. :)

Rohen
July 16th, 2007, 05:13 PM
Thunderbird is ok, I really liked it. There are things, however, that evolution provides that Thunderbird doesn't. I can keep a calendar, memos, and tasks all in one app.

If there's a program similar to Evo, then I might look at it. Anyone know of one?

xpod
July 16th, 2007, 05:32 PM
The only software i actually "need" is the Ubuntu cd itself........everything else is a bonus:)

Canis familiaris
July 16th, 2007, 05:56 PM
Nero Linux may be fine but I think K3b has a better interface. Personal Preference I suppose.

Note360
July 17th, 2007, 12:44 AM
1. Terminal - Come one nothign would exist with otu this thing here
2. emacs/joe/nano - my editors of choice (coding/complex fixes/fast fixes or easy fixes or just writing)
3. swiftweasel (swiftfox basically)
4. zsh or bash
5. python or ruby - where i do fast calculations and whatever. I love them both
6. Thunar or mc/vfu - easy to get around, though I still say a regular shell is better
7. cplay - my media player of choice. It loads my library fast and over all its jsut great)
8. rtorrent - my bt client of choice after deluge broke on my computer
9. Open Office - For school stuff. Usually i draft it up in plain text though. Sometimes I am lazy and I hand it in in monospace with markdown formating. Ive been yelled at for this...
10. beagle - find my files and fast.

bodhi.zazen
July 17th, 2007, 12:49 AM
Hmm I don't use most of that stuff, although I do enjoy Compiz/Beryl

Move to Cafe as this is not a support thread.

ThinkBuntu
July 17th, 2007, 12:58 AM
I'll exclude apps that come installed...I'll keep it GTK as much as I can, too (I prefer K3B and KFTPGrabber)


Inkscape
GVim
Thunderbird
Abiword
Gnumeric
Epiphany
gFTP
XChat
Zsh
Brasero

phrostbyte
July 17th, 2007, 04:36 AM
Top ten lists don't do Ubuntu justice. There is over 20,000 packages in the official repository.

Hexydes
July 18th, 2007, 02:41 PM
Feel free to list your top 20,000 Ubuntu apps. :)

stepan2
July 18th, 2007, 02:45 PM
kopete
remastersys
ktorrent
konsole
firefox
k3b
vlc
and nothing more really

Siph0n
July 18th, 2007, 02:51 PM
wow i never used a single item in the original top 10 list, for this thread....

1) Gedit
2) Python
3) Firefox (tho will probably look at an alternative as it keeps freezing my computer :( )
4) Gaim
5) Terminal (im not sure of the exact name, whatever is default in Ubuntu)

Those arent in any specific order....

mangar
July 18th, 2007, 03:05 PM
1. eclipse
2. g++
3. valgrind
4. firefox
5. evolution
6. tomboy
7. amarok
8. k3b
9. vlc
10. gnome-terminal
11. specto

tomcheng76
July 18th, 2007, 03:13 PM
1 Firefox -- most important as some addon are essential, memory eater, any good alternative @ Linux ?
2 Amarok -- great music player & management software
3 Pidgin -- i love the simple interface, using for MSN
4 GMplayer -- nearly all videos can be handled, deinterface is not good, sometimes i use VLC for that reason
5 wine -- essential for windows application, chance for playing windows game
6 evolution -- email checker, good and i dont have complaint
7 comix -- comic viewer (using Hamana in windows , both are great)
8 easytag -- edit song tag, especially mp3 via cddb
9 K3b -- great CD/DVD burner
10 VirtualBox -- great virtual machine emulator

These softwares are essential for my daily desktop operation

DeadSuperHero
July 18th, 2007, 03:50 PM
For me, the big ones are:

1. Beryl/ Compiz Fusion (whichever works better)
2. Frostwire
3. Screenlets
4. Avant Window Navigtor
5. Banshee
6. AGS Linux Engine
7. Pidgin
8. ScummVM
9. The Default Gnome Terminal
10. Firefox/ Thunderbird + CheckGmail

That's about it. It's all completely awesome to me, though.
And I got the AGS Linux Engine working for me, I was impressed. I actually managed to get them to launch just by clicking the "ags" executable.

Matakoo
July 18th, 2007, 03:57 PM
im aware ( i code ) but still, why pay when theres FOSS, generally thats what its all about

Nope. It's about freedom. Insisting that people should only use programs that Stallman and the FSF approves of takes away some freedom. Now, I prefer things to be Open Source/Free Software but if something that isn't free is the only choice (or works better than the free equivalents), then so be it. Then I would have no problem whatsoever in using that instead. Some people need Nero. Others need the nvidia drivers, Maya, Turboprint, Lightscribe software, Pagestream, or something else free software can't deliver as of now. When it can, great! When it can't, use something else instead. The bottomline is, or should be, use whatever works best for you.

And that's the way it should be. It's my computer after all. Not Stallman's. Not yours. Mine.

And I applaud the non-free companies that dare to take the risk of selling/making Linux software even when it's software I wouldn't use myself.

ceelo
July 18th, 2007, 04:02 PM
In what way is Banshee lightweight? It takes up 30MB of memory immediately upon starting it. It easily consumes more memory on my system while idle, than Amarok does even while playing music. Not to mention it drags while scrolling through my collection while Amarok flies through it very smoothly. It seems like a nice player, it is just very far from lightweight, at least from my experience.

Matakoo
July 18th, 2007, 04:24 PM
Well, okay. I give my top ten then...only non-default apps.

Firefox (not default in Kubuntu)
Evolution (same as above)
gLabels (anyone know of a good KDE equivalen? The Gnome file selector drives me nuts...)
kgtk-wrapper (to use KDE-dialogues in Gnome-apps. Unfortunately, doesn't work with glabels...)
Scribus-NG
Xara extreme
KMyMoney
Taskjuggler
VLC
Kmess (if you only need/use MSN for IM, it's much better than Kopete or Pidgin). Don't use the version in the repos though...it's too old.

Runner-ups:

Frostwire
KGPG
Kget
Superkaramba
Beryl
Kasablanca
Vladstudio companion


Then there's the usual suspects...but installed as default. OpenOffice, Amarok, Ktorrent, Akregator. Among others.

sunexplodes
July 18th, 2007, 07:05 PM
1. PCMan FM
2. Transmission
3. MPD + Sonata
4. Ex Falso
5. Pan Newsreader
6. VLC Media Player

DM was on fire!
July 18th, 2007, 07:14 PM
(WHY DOES K3B HAVE TO BE KDE :( )

What's wrong with KDE? o_o A lot of the programs I use are KDE, and it's kinda cool that Gnome, KDE and Xcfe can gel in harmony.

Anyway, I strongly agree with Beryl being number one. Beryl just oozes awesomeness.
I also like Nero a lot. I use it on my Windows computer. It's a very light CD burner.

Also, out of sheer curiosity, why isn't Wine on there?
My top ten...

1 - Beryl/Compiz Fusion
2 - Konqueror
3 - StepMania
4 - Wine
5 - Terminal
6 - RealPlayer/Helix
7 - StopWatch
8 - GIMP
9 - SuperTux
10 - Sticky Notes

:D
(I don't have K3B or Nero on here because I actually don't have a CD burner in this machine. XD)

tgm4883
July 18th, 2007, 10:29 PM
What's wrong with KDE? o_o A lot of the programs I use are KDE, and it's kinda cool that Gnome, KDE and Xcfe can gel in harmony.

Anyway, I strongly agree with Beryl being number one. Beryl just oozes awesomeness.
I also like Nero a lot. I use it on my Windows computer. It's a very light CD burner.

Also, out of sheer curiosity, why isn't Wine on there?
My top ten...

1 - Beryl/Compiz Fusion
2 - Konqueror
3 - StepMania
4 - Wine
5 - Terminal
6 - RealPlayer/Helix
7 - StopWatch
8 - GIMP
9 - SuperTux
10 - Sticky Notes

:D
(I don't have K3B or Nero on here because I actually don't have a CD burner in this machine. XD)

Probably because Wine is not a program, its a translation layer

OzzyFrank
July 19th, 2007, 12:01 AM
Yeah, Beryl is so awesome, it gives me a reason to use Ubuntu. I just sit there opening things so I can watch them be consumed by fire when I close them. When I show friends, they ask "Can you do anything else in Ubuntu?", and I'm like "Er, I dunno... but don't you think that is SO cool??". I'm thinking of forking out for Windows Vista Home Premium so I can spend some quality time with the 3D Flip feature, as well as going glassy-eyed and gurgling little "Ooooh"s over the Aero interface.

russo.mic
July 19th, 2007, 07:49 AM
Beryl is at the top of my list.

I've never quite understood why everybody has such a problem with beryl and it's "instabilities"

I've used it on 2 different laptops, both with the dreaded ATI video cards, and it runs smooth as anything on both machines. I've had very few beryl problems or crashes. setting up was easy on my mactell and 7.04.

KTorrent, Amarok, and K3B are great, and I'm running Gnome. I also don't understand why everybody has such issues running KDE apps in Gnome. Harddisk space is cheap people!

theonlyalterego
July 19th, 2007, 06:43 PM
Well I don't use my ubuntu box for much more than a personal server, so it lacks many of the fancy gui elements...

1. rtorrent + screen
2. rtorstat
3. VLC (love the stream to network wizard)
4. gftp
5. gnump3d
6. tightvnc
7. elinks
8. firefox
9. sshd


Guess that's it really...

Frak
July 19th, 2007, 06:55 PM
Azureus 2nd?
Nero 6th, instead of K3b
No Amarok on the list?
Not a very good list. :(

revertex
July 20th, 2007, 01:35 PM
you can restrict that list to only one app.

vmware server >> windows xp as guest os

it's all that you will need.

Hexydes
July 20th, 2007, 02:39 PM
Heh, VMWare Server died on me after I updated to Feisty, and no matter what I do, I can't get it to work again.

It worked great when it was working, but that hasn't been in a few months...

r76
July 21st, 2007, 02:03 AM
When I show friends, they ask "Can you do anything else in Ubuntu?", and I'm like "Er, I dunno... but don't you think that is SO cool??" :biggrin:
My top ten:
1) Kaffeine (for dvb viewing / recording)
2) Opera
3) Avidemux
4) Freeguide
5) DVDstyler
6) ProjectX and mjpegtools (mplex) for demux and remux digital TV
7) Konqueror
8) Picasa - not a 'need' actually but the list was short

Well that's it but I'm sure there's a lot more if you count the dependencies (ProjectX and Freeguide need Java too) especially using the KDE apps in Gnome ;)

revertex
July 21st, 2007, 11:04 AM
Heh, VMWare Server died on me after I updated to Feisty, and no matter what I do, I can't get it to work again.

It worked great when it was working, but that hasn't been in a few months...

<off-topic>you should give virtualbox a try.
i can't get vmware to compile with my custom kernel, virtualbox save my day.
http://www.virtualbox.org/</off-topic>

spupy
July 22nd, 2007, 03:42 PM
The Software I can't live without (no order):
1/ Fluxbox
2/ Conky
3/ xPad - notes
4/ Leafpad
5/ Minimalistic Swiftfox
6/ Aterm and Tilda
7/ Pidgin, Skype
8/ Rox ( ~ my sox :P ), occasionaly Thunar
9/ MPD + Sonata

Without 7/, i love minimalistic and simple programs :)

dylan623
July 23rd, 2007, 06:51 AM
:biggrin:
My top ten:
1) Kaffeine (for dvb viewing / recording)
2) Opera
3) Avidemux
4) Freeguide
5) DVDstyler
6) ProjectX and mjpegtools (mplex) for demux and remux digital TV
7) Konqueror
8) Picasa - not a 'need' actually but the list was short

Well that's it but I'm sure there's a lot more if you count the dependencies (ProjectX and Freeguide need Java too) especially using the KDE apps in Gnome ;)

Waaaay too much proprietary software.

Geany is a great app that is under-appreciated.

Frak
July 23rd, 2007, 07:06 AM
1. Amarok
2. Thunderbird
3. K3b
4. Opera
5. VMware Workstation/Server/Virtualbox
6. Xara Xtreme
7. Google Earth
8. Google Picasa
9. Super Karamba
10. Frostwire

bomanizer
July 23rd, 2007, 10:05 AM
Openoffice
Gedit
Firefox
XMMS
Gftp
Gaim
Automatix
Streamtuner
?
?

tcoffeep
July 23rd, 2007, 02:56 PM
Firefox
Gaim
Deluge
Frostwire
GNUDoQ
OpenOffice
KPDF
VLC Media Player
AVG Anti-virus (Linux version)
Seamonkey

DigitalDuality
July 23rd, 2007, 03:01 PM
d

Hexydes
July 23rd, 2007, 05:49 PM
<off-topic>you should give virtualbox a try.
i can't get vmware to compile with my custom kernel, virtualbox save my day.
http://www.virtualbox.org/</off-topic>

I will most certainly try it out! :)

D!mon
July 25th, 2007, 08:31 AM
k3b > nero
ktorrent > azureus
amarok > banshee

k3b still fails to write files more than 4 GB :( I read somewhere that this was fixed recently at the kernel level, so hope in the next version we won't need nero anymore..

Arwen
July 25th, 2007, 10:02 AM
Automatix
OpenOffice
Gedit
Azureus
Bittorrent
Mozilla Firefox
Lots of music video-music players and dvd -cd burners rippers and stuff :-D
Friostwire
Gftp
aMSN

tgm4883
July 25th, 2007, 03:42 PM
whats with all the automatix? If we are going to add programs that install other programs then I believe all the lists are missing apt-get and synaptic

vexorian
July 25th, 2007, 03:44 PM
# Code::blocks
# inkscape


hmm can't think of any other.

Frak
July 25th, 2007, 04:30 PM
whats with all the automatix? If we are going to add programs that install other programs then I believe all the lists are missing apt-get and synaptic
Good for you!

Alexander2007
July 30th, 2007, 06:20 AM
*Banshee
*F-Spot
*Pidgin
*SoundConverter
*Brasero
*OpenOffice.org
*Firefox
*gtk-recordMyDesktop
*Totem
*GIMP
:)

handy
July 30th, 2007, 06:49 AM
Nero 3
DVDshrink 3.2
SmartRipper
Avidemux
Cedega
Guild Wars
Oblivion
nVidia drivers, Codecs, libdvdcss

thelinux_guy
July 30th, 2007, 06:59 AM
Software that I absolutely need :

*Firefox
*AbiWord
*All Audio Codecs
*InkScape
*Exaile
*K3B
*GTKpod
*Gaim/Pidgin
*EasyTag
*aMule

There is about 5 more things that I would have to have to make and install of Ubuntu usefull to me but oh well :)

Hexydes
August 1st, 2007, 03:06 PM
Just for the record, I tried Deluge after seeing others recommend it in this thread. While I do like the fact that it is much lighter than Azureus, there were not enough options available, and the main cincher was the fact that I could not set it as the default torrent-handling application in Swiftfox.

So, back to Azureus I go...

tgm4883
August 1st, 2007, 04:32 PM
Just for the record, I tried Deluge after seeing others recommend it in this thread. While I do like the fact that it is much lighter than Azureus, there were not enough options available, and the main cincher was the fact that I could not set it as the default torrent-handling application in Swiftfox.

So, back to Azureus I go...

Well just to be argumentitive, I also tried Deluge from this thread and thats what I use now :)

Espreon
August 1st, 2007, 04:44 PM
1)Compiz-Fusion
2)Swiftfox
3)Battle for Wesnoth
4)Thunderbird
5)Songbird
6)Amarok
7)Picasa
Eight)Battle for Wesnoth
9)Wine-Doors
10)Innotek Virtualbox

hessiess
August 1st, 2007, 04:50 PM
softwere i use:)

blender

blender

blender

blender

blender

blender

blender

OO

gimp

FF

:lolflag:

Hexydes
August 1st, 2007, 09:54 PM
Well just to be argumentitive, I also tried Deluge from this thread and thats what I use now :)

Fair enough. :)

I don't think it is a bad client in any way; it simply didn't have enough options (such as raising/lowering download priority on individual files). Also, it crashed and corrupted itself somehow. I eventually was able to fix it after looking through the forums, but I don't know what it fixed, and it sucks that it happened to begin with.

I'll certainly be willing to give it another go down the line, though.

Frak
August 1st, 2007, 10:27 PM
Fair enough. :)

I don't think it is a bad client in any way; it simply didn't have enough options (such as raising/lowering download priority on individual files). Also, it crashed and corrupted itself somehow. I eventually was able to fix it after looking through the forums, but I don't know what it fixed, and it sucks that it happened to begin with.

I'll certainly be willing to give it another go down the line, though.
The latest update from Ubuntu corrupted its libraries appearantly.

Hexydes
August 1st, 2007, 10:59 PM
The latest update from Ubuntu corrupted its libraries appearantly.

That's exactly when it happened, too. Not cool. :(

Frak
August 1st, 2007, 11:01 PM
That's exactly when it happened, too. Not cool. :(
It also done something with Java, because Azureus quit around that time with Deluge.
I'm using uTorrent now. At least Wine is pretty hard to screw up. :)

tcoffeep
August 2nd, 2007, 07:21 AM
Ever since I d/l'ed the new version of Deluge off of their website, I've had faster speeds than ever. They also fixed it up a bit, and before I sound like an infomercial, I shall sign off *salutes* peace.

ike
August 2nd, 2007, 08:03 AM
I don't have time for writing a top 10 list (at work, running windows :-P ), but here are some of my favorite apps:
* Eclipse - Supports programming in a lot of different programming languages. It really is a nice app.
* Sound Juicer - Great for ripping CDs.
* Mousepad - Faster than gedit and a lot better that notepad.
* k3b :)

And of course there are a lot of firefox plugins (gmail manager, foxmarks, adblock plus, mouse gestures etc) that I refuse to live without, but they are not really part of Ubuntu.

Hallvor
August 2nd, 2007, 10:07 AM
I only have six:

K3B (Reliable. Never had a bad burn with it)
VLC (Plays just about everything you throw at it!)
aMule (Stable and reliable)
BitTornado (Lightweight, stable and reliable)
XMMS (Lightweight, stable and reliable)
Gaim (Quite light, connects to almost everything out there)

Hexydes
August 2nd, 2007, 02:49 PM
It also done something with Java, because Azureus quit around that time with Deluge.
I'm using uTorrent now. At least Wine is pretty hard to screw up. :)

Is there any trick with getting uTorrent installed? The little I read on it sounded like it was more than just double-clicking the installation executable. uTorrent is hands-down my favorite torrent application ever, but it seemed like it was going to be too much effort to get it running in WINE.

vexorian
August 2nd, 2007, 05:01 PM
Inkscape! Once you get into it, you love it, and I think that it is way more useful and easier to use than the gimp and can fairly replace it.

Frak
August 2nd, 2007, 07:54 PM
Is there any trick with getting uTorrent installed? The little I read on it sounded like it was more than just double-clicking the installation executable. uTorrent is hands-down my favorite torrent application ever, but it seemed like it was going to be too much effort to get it running in WINE.
Lets say you have the latest version of Wine running and you saved uTorrent.exe to your desktop. Run

wine ~/Desktop/utorrent.exe
That should install it, then you may have to restart X, but there will be a submenu in the Applications menu that says Wine, and uTorrent will be in there.
**EDIT**
Make sure that you tell uTorrent to save a menu to the start menu, it should be enabled by default though.

Rohen
August 2nd, 2007, 08:14 PM
Have you given ktorrent a try? I am also a big fan of utorrent, but that was when I used to use Windows XP. Now that I use Ubuntu, ktorrent is it for me.

Hexydes
August 3rd, 2007, 05:52 PM
Lets say you have the latest version of Wine running and you saved uTorrent.exe to your desktop. Run

wine ~/Desktop/utorrent.exe
That should install it, then you may have to restart X, but there will be a submenu in the Applications menu that says Wine, and uTorrent will be in there.
**EDIT**
Make sure that you tell uTorrent to save a menu to the start menu, it should be enabled by default though.

Ok, I will give that a try. Thanks!

Hexydes
August 3rd, 2007, 05:53 PM
Have you given ktorrent a try? I am also a big fan of utorrent, but that was when I used to use Windows XP. Now that I use Ubuntu, ktorrent is it for me.

I have not tried kTorrent, but I will certainly give that a look as well. Thanks! :)

perspectoff
August 3rd, 2007, 07:49 PM
Top 10 Utilities:

Firestarter GUI to manage the IPTables firewall. Simple, elegant, indispensible.

LAMP server (Linux, Apache, MySql, Perl) meta-package. Installed with one click in Ubuntu (Synaptic Package Manager-->Edit-->MarkPackages by Task-->LAMP server). Allowed me to set up multiple websites within a few days. Took all the headache out of setting up a server.

Drupal 5.1 -- Make a professional looking website, including online store, blogs, stories, whatever. Modular, easy to learn, comes as a Synaptic Package manager package.

I was up and running in 2 days.

DDClient -- take advantage of DynDNS Dynamic IP addressing service. So those of us with DSL and Dynamic IP addresses can host web pages.

Wine (open source) (or the commercial CrossOver Linux)-- yep, there are just some programs for Windows for which I can't find equivalents in Linux yet.

Gparted or Partman (Partman is better but only available on the Ubuntu Installation Live CD) -- sometimes you just have to arrange your partitions.

Wallpaper Changer Python script -- this is the only script that worked for me easily. It is written by a gnome developer. I put it in the startup services as "python change-background.py" so that a random wallpaper came up each time I logged in. The script is at: http://oracle.bridgewayconsulting.com.au/~davyd/misc/change-background-py.html

XMMS. Still the best, most compact music player, especially for Internet streams.

ubuntu-restricted-extras and w32codecs (Java, Flash, msttcorefonts, some codecs) package. Gotta have those proprietary plugins.

Zoneminder security camera surveillance system. Yeah, it works in Feisty from the debian package install. It's really fun when integrated with MisterHouse or Smarthome.

Blender 3-D graphics creator. Wow!

Top 10 Fun:

Stellarium. This is the most amazing planetarium program! Like the venerable Starry Night (on windows/Mac platform), but open source.

Google Earth. Not open source, but free and nowadays irresistible.

Frozen Bubble. Mindless, addicting. I suppose I could do without it.

If you think there are lots of extremely high-quality games for Linux, you're wrong!

Look at this site: http://www.icculus.org/lgfaq/gamelist.php?license=free

I love Wing Commander... There are lots of Quake-engine based first-person shooters to rival anything on Windows.

Also check out:

http://rangit.com/software/top-8-linux-games-of-2007/
http://www.bspcn.com/2007/05/26/top-8-linux-games-of-2007/

tgm4883
August 3rd, 2007, 07:59 PM
If you think there are lots of extremely high-quality games for Linux, you're wrong!

Look at this site: http://www.icculus.org/lgfaq/gamelist.php?license=free


Was that a mis-spoke, or are you unhappy with the game selection?

Hexydes
August 8th, 2007, 10:30 PM
Was that a mis-spoke, or are you unhappy with the game selection?

I'm going to assume he meant to say:



"If you think there aren't lots of extremely high-quality games for Linux, you're wrong!"

;)

Hexydes
August 8th, 2007, 10:32 PM
Stellarium. This is the most amazing planetarium program! Like the venerable Starry Night (on windows/Mac platform), but open source.

Whoa, that looks pretty cool. I think I will have to check that out tonight! Thanks! :)

Frak
August 8th, 2007, 10:39 PM
There are plenty of high quality games in Linux.
Nexuiz anyone?
OpenArena, Hmm?

MetalMusicAddict
August 8th, 2007, 10:43 PM
SSH
Grip
Firefox
Thunderbird
GAIM
GIMP
Inkscape
VNC
Exaile
EasyTag


My list is bigger than 10 but that what was asked for and I wasnt sure if Samba should go there but its a big one for me as well.

Hexydes
August 13th, 2007, 05:36 PM
There are plenty of high quality games in Linux.
Nexuiz anyone?
OpenArena, Hmm?

Quake Wars will run on Linux, won't it? And the next Unreal game? That's not a bad group. :)

Lividity
August 30th, 2007, 12:09 PM
1. fluxbox
2. thunar
3. nano
4. firefox
5. rtorrent
6. mplayer
7. gnomebaker
8. OpenOffice
9. pidgin / pork / finch an IM app
10. aterm

Dimitriid
August 30th, 2007, 02:43 PM
I NEED more games like Battle for Wesnoth!!:guitar: Im thinking of a fork from it that keeps the system but turns into a free roaming, open RPG game instead of just strategy battles.

Like Final Fantasy gone Wesnoth.

Hexydes
September 3rd, 2007, 04:05 PM
Thanks to whoever Dugg my article! :)

Every positive article about Ubuntu is good exposure. I'd definitely appreciate it if you Dugg the story, for me, but more importantly, for Ubuntu. :)

lol, if you sift through my Dugg stories, I bet I have well-over 100 dugg articles about Ubuntu. :)

Hexydes
January 8th, 2008, 09:02 PM
For anyone reading this, instead of using Azureus, give Transmission a try. I've found that it works a lot better in Ubuntu (closer to how, say, uTorrent works in Windows).

Onyros
January 8th, 2008, 10:46 PM
You should really try rTorrent, then. Latest version of Transmission is cool, but rTorrent is the über-torrent client. Take a few minutes configuring the dot rtorrent config file, and you're set.

I just keep it open in a "workspace" (it's actually a tag, as I'm using Awesome (http://awesome.naquadah.org/)), save torrent files to a folder I have being monitored by rTorrent and that's it. It starts downloading immediately, and somehow it has been faster than other torrent clients I've tried, which include Azureus, Deluge, µtorrent (through wine) and Transmission.

K. Mandla has a great howto at his blog, which you can check out here (http://kmandla.wordpress.com/2007/05/02/howto-use-rtorrent-like-a-pro/).

bodhi.zazen
January 9th, 2008, 12:30 AM
@Onyros :

Try running with screen :

http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6340
http://www.linuxjournal.com/articles/lj/0105/6340/6340t1.html

Hexydes
January 9th, 2008, 04:33 PM
You should really try rTorrent, then. Latest version of Transmission is cool, but rTorrent is the über-torrent client. Take a few minutes configuring the dot rtorrent config file, and you're set.

I just keep it open in a "workspace" (it's actually a tag, as I'm using Awesome (http://awesome.naquadah.org/)), save torrent files to a folder I have being monitored by rTorrent and that's it. It starts downloading immediately, and somehow it has been faster than other torrent clients I've tried, which include Azureus, Deluge, µtorrent (through wine) and Transmission.

K. Mandla has a great howto at his blog, which you can check out here (http://kmandla.wordpress.com/2007/05/02/howto-use-rtorrent-like-a-pro/).

I will certainly try that, as downloads with Transmission have been pretty slow (though I like that I can set it in Firefox to associate with torrent files).

mpstump
January 11th, 2008, 04:35 AM
Kudos for putting Gridwars in there. I thought I was the only freak that played that one. If I've been playing for a while, it changes my perception to the extent that I cannot drive and have to adjust for a few minutes.

I don't understand the people who play Frozen Bubble. I guess it's just not my style.

OzzyFrank
January 11th, 2008, 12:34 PM
I don't understand the people who play Frozen Bubble. I guess it's just not my style.

I think it's actually very easy to understand why so many people love Frozen Bubble, but then I am not a gamer. I don't have much time or inclination to play serious games, so I guess I fall into the "average user" category. People like me will, once in a blue moon, fire up a game that isn't too involving, just for a bit of fun or to let off some steam from doing too much work on the PC.

In Windows, Solitaire is still the most widely played game, but I personally always like firing up Pinball that came with Plus! as a quick and easy bit of distraction. As for 3rd party games, I found I liked games that could give me a quick thrill without any major commitment, like Tyrian (fly around shooting alien craft) or even arcade games.

In Ubuntu, I found Frozen Bubble to be a good bit of fun, so can understand why many hail FB as the best game in Linux... sure beats Solitaire!

I did do some more serious gaming years back, but now rarely fire up even FB or my favourite pinball games. But I can understand gamers looking down on simpler games like that... but one just has to remember gamers are a minority, and that most PC users who rarely play games would find FB a hoot and a holler, hehe.

disturbed1
January 11th, 2008, 01:07 PM
Didn't list the depandacies which are programs on their own (like dvdauthor, dvgrab)

1. Kino
2. gftp
3. DVDStyler
4. aften
5. mjpegtools (mpeg2enc)
6. ToVid (ToDisc)
7. Nero Linux
8. Glabels
9. GWC
10. The Real CDRecord (cdrecord, mkisofs, GCD master) not some hacked up cdrkit/cdrtools :D

11. WIne
12. AviSynth
13. avs2yuv
14. Panasonic DV codec

jsmnuk
January 31st, 2010, 08:29 AM
Yeah, really tough call. As nice as K3B is, I do think that Nero is a bit more polished, and I seem to have a bit more success with it. Certainly, if you don't want to shell out the $30 for Nero, K3B is not going to be a disappointment. :)

Speaking of disappointments (and I'm not trying to be nasty or anything), Nero Linux 4 cannot hold a candle to Nero 9 with a Blu-Ray plug-in in Windows Vista, which I have along with Adobe Premiere Elements 7. I have made about a half-dozen Blu-Ray movies, sourced from my Blu-Ray camcorder. Both Nero 9 and Adobe can compile, EDIT and burn Blu-ray discs, and APE7 has other features like being able to rotate images in editing. That's why the Nero Linux 4 has a low price, because you can't edit a video project and video files in it.

Is "the keys to the Kingdom" the issue with Blu-Ray, or is it that nobody cares? If my Linux skills were better, I'd tackle this project head-on.

BTW, will K3B even play Blu-Ray?

riksaga
March 23rd, 2010, 04:45 PM
IBM AFP viewer printer

Hornitodog
April 10th, 2012, 09:41 PM
1. A TV tuner app that works. TVTime runs the tuner well, but as noted all over the net, sound problems abound. A nice, polished, fully functional, easy to use and install TV tuner app would be my #1 wish! As an aside, I feel Myth TV, and XBMC are abominations of needless complexity and in-operability, and they also have problems with TV sound.

2. Adobe Lightroom. While I have tried nearly all of the photo apps for Linux based distros, but to me, nothing quite equals Adobe Lightroom. That said, Adobe Lightroom can cost $100+, while the Linux-based apps cost nothing. I really like UFRaw, Raw Therapee, and some others, and use them as much as possible.

That's all that is on my list, as I am otherwise very happy with 12.04. That said, I must continue with a dual-boot setup due to the TV tuner sound problem, as my only TV is my computer. Ubuntu could own me with a nice TV tuner app!! LOL!

tgm4883
April 10th, 2012, 09:46 PM
1. A TV tuner app that works. TVTime runs the tuner well, but as noted all over the net, sound problems abound. A nice, polished, fully functional, easy to use and install TV tuner app would be my #1 wish! As an aside, I feel Myth TV, and XBMC are abominations of needless complexity and in-operability, and they also have problems with TV sound.

2. Adobe Lightroom. While I have tried nearly all of the photo apps for Linux based distros, but to me, nothing quite equals Adobe Lightroom. That said, Adobe Lightroom can cost $100+, while the Linux-based apps cost nothing. I really like UFRaw, Raw Therapee, and some others, and use them as much as possible.

That's all that is on my list, as I am otherwise very happy with 12.04. That said, I must continue with a dual-boot setup due to the TV tuner sound problem, as my only TV is my computer. Ubuntu could own me with a nice TV tuner app!! LOL!

XBMC is complicated? MythTV is complicated? When is the last time you used these?

roelforg
April 10th, 2012, 09:58 PM
Dunno if it was listed but:
build-assentials
git
openssh-server
wine
vlc (with lib*av*-*-extra)
gedit-plugins
Are must-haves!
build-essentials, you're gonna have to compile an app sooner or later, so better be ready
wine, some stuff, sadly, just doesn't have a linux eq. that has the same features
vlc, better ui then mplayer or ffmpeg yet plays all formats
Openssh saved me a few times when my gfx-card malfunctioned

Hornitodog
April 11th, 2012, 04:15 PM
XBMC is complicated? MythTV is complicated? When is the last time you used these?
It's been awhile since I've used Myth, but I checked out XBMC again last night after reading an article yesterday in "Lifehacker" praising it. Nice GUI, flashy, pretty to look at, but I am still not impressed with it, and it still does not run either of my tuner cards (a basic analogue KWorld SAA7134, and a hybrid ASUS).

Last night though, and after countless hours of researching and trying other "fixes" over the last six months, I was finally able to discover a workaround to get sound out of TVTime. I installed the "Multimedia Systems Selector" app, and ran it along with TVTime, choosing ALSA for both output and input, and for "device" at input, "SAA7134PCM". Bingo! Wonderful, clear, stable, perfectly timed, stereo sound! So for now, and until TVTime is updated to work without problem in 12.04, I'm good.

I continue to feel, that until Ubuntu and the other Linux distros start making available easy to install, configure, and use, apps for common hardware, their adoption and use will continue to be hampered. Not everyone is a geek, or has the time to learn command line instructions to configure and use basic hardware. Nonetheless, I continue to love it, despite the quirks!

tgm4883
April 11th, 2012, 04:48 PM
It's been awhile since I've used Myth, but I checked out XBMC again last night after reading an article yesterday in "Lifehacker" praising it. Nice GUI, flashy, pretty to look at, but I am still not impressed with it, and it still does not run either of my tuner cards (a basic analogue KWorld SAA7134, and a hybrid ASUS).

Last night though, and after countless hours of researching and trying other "fixes" over the last six months, I was finally able to discover a workaround to get sound out of TVTime. I installed the "Multimedia Systems Selector" app, and ran it along with TVTime, choosing ALSA for both output and input, and for "device" at input, "SAA7134PCM". Bingo! Wonderful, clear, stable, perfectly timed, stereo sound! So for now, and until TVTime is updated to work without problem in 12.04, I'm good.

I continue to feel, that until Ubuntu and the other Linux distros start making available easy to install, configure, and use, apps for common hardware, their adoption and use will continue to be hampered. Not everyone is a geek, or has the time to learn command line instructions to configure and use basic hardware. Nonetheless, I continue to love it, despite the quirks!

XBMC isn't meant to be used with tuner cards. Sure it is starting to add that functionality, but I'd say it's far from perfect.

IMHO, the Mythbuntu team makes setting up MythTV pretty simple. Sure there are going to be some small hurdles you have to deal with, but if you can't be bothered to read some instructions

TV Tuner cards are not common, they don't come in most new PC's. More often than not you must buy these at the store and physically install them in the PC. This is not something that non-geeks usually do. That said, for a majority of hardware that is common Ubuntu does work great on. Further, if you are implying that other operating systems have easy to install, configure, and use apps for common hardware then you have either never purchased and installed Windows on a new PC, or don't realized that support for hardware comes from the manufacturers, not the OS vendor. Lastly, there are a vast number of apps on any platform that serve similar functions. If you find one that does not work, try another. Please realize that while you may feel a particular piece of software is junk and something may need to be done about it, that it may work perfectly for someone else with zero tweaking. In this instance you should either file a bug and be prepared to work with developers to resolve the issue, find different software that works for you, or fix the code that is making this difficult for users and submit a patch upstream.

jjpcexpert
April 15th, 2012, 10:02 AM
1. GET BACK TO DEBIAN - non-existent, but hey, I could make it
Reason: I like GNU/Linux Mint, which is based on Ubuntu, which I'll use if it's the only Linux available. I also like Debian. What I want to do is a Debian-replacer that deletes all but /opt, /usr/share and /home from the root, and then using a CD installs a minimal GUI system based on MATE and Xfce that runs on Debian only. Oh and it does not delete all of /etc.
2. A working GNOME 3
GNOME 3 has not worked for me on either Debian GNU/Linux or Linux Mint.
3. A second installer tailored to removable disks. When I boot Linux Mint, I'm booting from a removable disk. I used Ubiquity as usual, but something in what I did gives me a shoulder pain.
4,5,6,7,8,9,10. Nothing. All I need from there is Inkscape (too easy to install to be put here) and what ever else you get from repo.

Hornitodog
April 16th, 2012, 05:44 PM
XBMC isn't meant to be used with tuner cards. Sure it is starting to add that functionality, but I'd say it's far from perfect.

IMHO, the Mythbuntu team makes setting up MythTV pretty simple. Sure there are going to be some small hurdles you have to deal with, but if you can't be bothered to read some instructions

TV Tuner cards are not common, they don't come in most new PC's. More often than not you must buy these at the store and physically install them in the PC. This is not something that non-geeks usually do. That said, for a majority of hardware that is common Ubuntu does work great on. Further, if you are implying that other operating systems have easy to install, configure, and use apps for common hardware then you have either never purchased and installed Windows on a new PC, or don't realized that support for hardware comes from the manufacturers, not the OS vendor. Lastly, there are a vast number of apps on any platform that serve similar functions. If you find one that does not work, try another. Please realize that while you may feel a particular piece of software is junk and something may need to be done about it, that it may work perfectly for someone else with zero tweaking. In this instance you should either file a bug and be prepared to work with developers to resolve the issue, find different software that works for you, or fix the code that is making this difficult for users and submit a patch upstream.

Well, thank you for that, but I've been using and building computers for almost a quarter century now, and while I am more knowledgeable about hardware than software, I do know my way around a computer. Note, that I have already done as you have suggested on many points, yet no permanent solutions have presented themselves. I still think Myth TV is not an "easy" program to setup and navigate, but once done, I was unable to get sound from that program either.

BTW, I don't agree with your assertion that TV tuners are not widespread. While you are right about them usually being an add-on peripheral, they number in the millions, made by manufacturers like MSI, ASUS, Hauppage, and many others. Surely, these corporations would not be wasting their time with the technology if they weren't selling a lot of them. So while not as essential as say, a hard-drive, I contend tuner usage is far more wide-spread than what you imply.

The older I get, the less patience and time I have to search for solutions for what I feel, should be elemental capabilities in an operating system. That said, I have nonetheless spent at least 30 hours researching and trying various fixes for the sound problem in TVTime, when used with any of the current distros, without success. The problem, when "Googled", comes back with numerous listings of people having the same problem, none having anymore success than I in correcting it.

In closing, I've deduced that the problem lies in Pulse, which has replaced OSS/ALSA in many Linux iterations, including Ubuntu. While there are fixes to "bring back" OSS capabilities, they are messy, and negatively affect other parts of the operating systems, hence, they are not practical. I have contacted the TVTime developers (as have hundreds of others), encouraging them to seek a solution, and offering help with testing.

Again, thank you for your reply.