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View Full Version : Why do we have Add/Remove when Synaptic is there?



ThinkBuntu
May 30th, 2007, 06:45 PM
I never understood why, in Ubuntu, there is both the Add/Remove app and Synaptic. Is there anything Add/Remove does that Synaptic doesn't, besides offering fewer packages? Am I missing something?

Adamant1988
May 30th, 2007, 06:49 PM
I never understood why, in Ubuntu, there is both the Add/Remove app and Synaptic. Is there anything Add/Remove does that Synaptic doesn't, besides offering fewer packages? Am I missing something?

It's all about the interface. GAI (Gnome App Install), which you call ADD/Remove, is a much more friendly looking application... that's about it.

ThinkBuntu
May 30th, 2007, 06:57 PM
It's all about the interface. GAI (Gnome App Install), which you call ADD/Remove, is a much more friendly looking application... that's about it.
So why not rename Synaptic "Add/Remove Software" (we have no qualms about calling gedit "Text Editor", after all), add a new category to the top of the left pane which contains a narrower selection of commonly requested apps, like in Add/Remove, and be done with it? Seems like meaningless bloat to me...

* Meanders over to Development (Gutsy Gibbon) Forum *

Adamant1988
May 30th, 2007, 07:00 PM
So why not rename Synaptic "Add/Remove Software" (we have no qualms about calling gedit "Text Editor", after all), add a new category to the top of the left pane which contains a narrower selection of commonly requested apps, like in Add/Remove, and be done with it? Seems like meaningless bloat to me...

* Meanders over to Development (Gutsy Gibbon) Forum *

While, to you, it seems like meaningless bloat, it does serve it's purpose well enough. Software installation through GAI is more friendly in general.

starcraft.man
May 30th, 2007, 07:06 PM
While, to you, it seems like meaningless bloat, it does serve it's purpose well enough. Software installation through GAI is more friendly in general.

I agree with adamant, I think both serve a purpose (even if GAI/Add/remove is unappreciated by new folk). Synaptic is great and I use it often when I want to do advanced package management (like when I downgraded a version of libwnck to better support Beryl, and then promptly locked it from upgrading). The average (beginner or less familiar to Ubuntu) likely doesn't have a need to do something that advanced, and the GAI provides a simple interface (like Automatix, though it seems popular and GAI is not unfortunately) for installing common apps without going to terminal or synaptic.

ThinkBuntu
May 30th, 2007, 07:13 PM
I agree with adamant, I think both serve a purpose (even if GAI/Add/remove is unappreciated by new folk). Synaptic is great and I use it often when I want to do advanced package management (like when I downgraded a version of libwnck to better support Beryl, and then promptly locked it from upgrading). The average (beginner or less familiar to Ubuntu) likely doesn't have a need to do something that advanced, and the GAI provides a simple interface (like Automatix, though it seems popular and GAI is not unfortunately) for installing common apps without going to terminal or synaptic.
Coming into Ubuntu, I looked at Add/Remove, and thought to myself, "this is all the free software available??" Then, as I tried out my different menu items under "System" I found Synaptic, and used it to add my software. It always seemed straight-forward to me...Search, select, apply. I've actually never used it for anything except adding or removing packages in the simplest of ways.

Adamant1988
May 30th, 2007, 07:20 PM
Coming into Ubuntu, I looked at Add/Remove, and thought to myself, "this is all the free software available??" Then, as I tried out my different menu items under "System" I found Synaptic, and used it to add my software. It always seemed straight-forward to me...Search, select, apply. I've actually never used it for anything except adding or removing packages in the simplest of ways.

That is all of the free-software available with .desktop files, I believe. Anything that makes a menu item and has an icon is available in there, with special exceptions for important things like flash, and codecs.

Also, concerning bloat... I would rather see OpenOffice taken out of Ubuntu-default than GAI. That would free up a LOT of room on the CD...

starcraft.man
May 30th, 2007, 07:55 PM
Also, concerning bloat... I would rather see OpenOffice taken out of Ubuntu-default than GAI. That would free up a LOT of room on the CD...

*cries* NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! I love my OpenOffice *hugs it*. You can't take it away :(.

I do agree again with adamant (this is becoming a pattern, suspicious... >.>) GAI installs most things you can via synaptic, just not the extras without icons and those not in the default repos (of course there is a simple GUI for adding sources so that can be fixed).

Oh and thinkbuntu, while you found Synaptic easy... some people (coming from windows for instance) may get very intimidated by it... we don't want to scare them away, and we're all about choice.

FuturePilot
May 30th, 2007, 08:48 PM
I see it as a double front end to apt-get. Synaptic is a front end to apt-get and Add/Remove is a front end to Synaptic. I don't think it's unnecessary bloat. I think it's much more user friendly than Synaptic from a new user stand point. But I personally have never used it.

Tundro Walker
May 31st, 2007, 01:23 AM
I think the extra function of the Add/Remove interface is to also recognize when you're trying to use a restricted format, EG: flash, wmv, mp3... I noticed the Add/Remove program always prompts if you absolutely, without a doubt want it to find and install the necessary components (on pain of death)...not Synaptic.

So, if it adds a nice interface, and also acts as a watch-dog, then I'm all for it.

Lucifiel
May 31st, 2007, 01:31 AM
LOL... when I started using Ubuntu, I just dived into Synaptic. There were about 3 times when I used Add/Remove but I'd no need for it at all.

However, it's easy to use and a lot less complicated than Synaptic. Most computer and Linux beginners would cry if this feature was removed.

Foxmike
May 31st, 2007, 01:50 AM
Well since I began with Ubuntu (and with Linux as well) I use Synaptics as it seems to give me more choices to show me what really it will be installed. But with my Feisty install (I know, a bit late, I have been using Ubuntu since beginning of Breezy) I discovered that "Add/Remove" menu and honestly, I now can't do without! But for me they are simply not serving the same purpose: I use Add/Remove to search for an application I would like to use. I use Synaptics to find out what package will be installed, to simply search for packages and get infos (versions etc...) and/or to choose the single package to install.

Dylnuge
May 31st, 2007, 02:16 AM
Ubuntu calls itself the most user-friendly distro ever. We users support that claim. Now, GAI is not necessarily the best way to install software, but it is easy. Most of us posting here know Linux. User-friendly means people who don't understand anything about computers in general should have little difficulty, moving the mouse off the table and up and down to move the cursor aside. GAI is easy. Synaptic seems simple, but which package is which may be complex. Do I need packagex-dev, packagex-files, etc. Do I need packagex or packagey. All of these things are made easy by GAI.

aysiu
May 31st, 2007, 02:40 AM
Let's have one thread on this instead of two, eh?
We should get rid of "Add/Remove" and rename Synaptic (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=459233)