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microsoft92sucks
May 5th, 2007, 03:17 AM
I really want to learn to do some programming but i don't know were to start theres 3 different things I want to do make games,write websites(i already can a lil but not very good),and learn to use the Terminal really good. Know the problem is I don't know what 1 would be the best and make learning the others easier and if Game programing what language and whats a good compiler for that language.

Jessehk
May 5th, 2007, 03:23 AM
First: Don't take this the wrong way, but please attempt to use some punctuation and correct wording (where instead of were, now instead of know). It really increases the chances that somebody can read what you're saying. ;) If English isn't your first language then ignore that.

Second: A knowledge of using the terminal will come to you (in my experience anyways), through actually using it. Start with basic things like navigating the file system, etc. There's a great website here: http://linuxcommand.org/learning_the_shell.php

Third: I'd say that the best language to learn for beginners on Linux is Python ( http://www.python.org ). There are a bunch of tutorials on their site and it's very beginner-friendly. Plus, it has a large amount of libraries that help you do things such as write games.

Another alternative is Ruby ( http://www.ruby-lang.org ), which I personally prefer. It might not be the best choice for a beginner though, and it doesn't have as many libraries as Python.

There are a variety of programming languages for Linux (C, C++, Java, C#, even O'Caml), but the common consensus here seems to be that languages such as Ruby and Python are ideal.
:)

microsoft92sucks
May 5th, 2007, 03:40 AM
Ive already read a few chapters of C++ for dummies I keep hearing to start with python and ive heard to start with C++ a few times to so y python or y C++ or y is any 1 of them the best to start with. Is it easy to learn more languages 1's u already know 1. Were did u people start?:confused:

trivialpackets
May 5th, 2007, 05:42 AM
Personally, I took a class on VB6, and thought I hated programming. Just didn't really get into it at all. Then I took a course on C++, thought it was very difficult, but the final project for the course was text based gradebook that we worked on in groups. I got so little sleep on that project, and the end result was 3000+ lines of code and an A. The success that we encountered has had me hooked since. Took another C++, but then had to get back to my degree. Now I'm learning python because I really just want to. :)

Unfortunately, there is no right answer to your question in my opinion. With what you describe, I guess python would be ok. Many libraries, django or turbogears could help with websites and such. Good luck.

microsoft92sucks
May 5th, 2007, 05:40 PM
how long did it take u b4 u understood C++ at all. And y would u want to learn python if u already know C++

seamless
May 6th, 2007, 02:54 AM
And y would u want to learn python if u already know C++
Every language has its place. There is not one language that is the best. Some tasks are better handled in C++ while other in Python. A sucessful professional programmer will know multiple languages and use the one that is best suited for the task at hand.

microsoft92sucks
May 7th, 2007, 06:39 PM
so wat languege is the best for simple computer games

LaRoza
May 7th, 2007, 07:08 PM
For websites: XHTML+CSS, PHP+SQL, ECMAScript, maybe Java,Perl, and Python

For graphical games:C++, Python, Java, VB.NET (any language that suits your needs, basically)

What kind of games are you interested in?

Programming GUI comes second to console based programs.

Wybiral
May 7th, 2007, 07:57 PM
Start at "_start"
Learn assembly :)

However...
number_of_answers(your_question) != 1;

I say start high, or start low... Python/Ruby or C/Assembly

Ayman
May 7th, 2007, 11:04 PM
I also suggest that you start with Python for the following reasons:
1) It's easy to learn for beginners, and there is plenty of resources (http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide) all over the Internet.
2) Once you master the language, you can start exploring web frameworks (such as Django (http://www.djangoproject.com/)).
3) Game programming with Python is easy thanks to PyGame (http://www.pygame.org/). Explore PyGame's website to see the variety of games that can be created with this library.

Later, if you decide to take a further step, you can learn C++ and/or other languages.

microsoft92sucks
May 8th, 2007, 12:25 AM
thank u for the help i think im going to start with Python whats a good python compiler that i can get throw synaptic or add and remove and wats a really good online tutorial and how long should it take b4 i feel comfortable with python and im making games

thank u for all the help

snoop
May 8th, 2007, 01:26 AM
python is already installed by default in ubuntu. A good starting place to learn python : http://www.diveintopython.org/toc/index.html

To make games, install pygame (called python-pygame , i believe in synaptic).

noerrorsfound
May 8th, 2007, 02:14 AM
python is already installed by default in ubuntu. A good starting place to learn python : http://www.diveintopython.org/toc/index.html
That book is for experienced programmers wanting to learn python and not for people who have never programmed before. It might be possible to learn Python from it without previous programming knowledge but it probably won't be easy.

microsoft92sucks
May 8th, 2007, 04:30 AM
I downloaded pygame but now were do i go to start it or start putting in my program

snoop
May 8th, 2007, 03:39 PM
Here is a tiny intro to pygame http://www.pygame.org/docs/tut/intro/intro.html

You can also look around the parent page - http://www.pygame.org/docs/

edit- for an easier (hopefully) python tutorial try here http://www.dickbaldwin.com/tocpyth.htm

LaRoza
May 8th, 2007, 04:03 PM
http://www.python.org/doc/current/tut/tut.html

This is also a good tutorial, by Guido van Rossum.

Ayman
May 8th, 2007, 04:30 PM
My previous post contained a link to Python tutorials for non-programmers. I suggest you check them and see which one you like best.
http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers

As for PyGame, I recommend that you spend some time learning the actual language before moving to game programming. PyGame requires working knowledge of Python.

Wybiral
May 8th, 2007, 08:50 PM
As for PyGame, I recommend that you spend some time learning the actual language before moving to game programming. PyGame requires working knowledge of Python.

I second that, but even more so... After you have a working knowledge or python games require further knowledge... You will need to know how to program.

The steps involved:

1. Learn Python language.
2. Learn common programming approaches and structure
3. Learn PyGame interface

What kind of games are you wanting to make?
Tic-tac-toe? Pong? Space invaders? Mario? Final Fantasy? Doom? Halo?

They will all require a different level of understanding, and different approaches to design.

There is no cure-all module for games, and there is no universal approach... Games vary a lot, and the programatical approach is heavily dependent on the design you're aiming for.

microsoft92sucks
May 9th, 2007, 08:08 AM
thank u for all the help i want to learn to do many tapes of games not just 1 but i understand thier all programmed very different so once I do them all Ill know witch on i like to do the most do any of u make games and if so wat kind and wats a good python compiler for Ubuntu

noerrorsfound
May 9th, 2007, 08:12 PM
thank u for all the help i want to learn to do many tapes of games not just 1 but i understand thier all programmed very different so once I do them all Ill know witch on i like to do the most do any of u make games and if so wat kind and wats a good python compiler for Ubuntu
Python is an interpreted language, so it does not require compiling. The only thing you need is the Python interpreter which is installed by default in Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions.

microsoft92sucks
May 10th, 2007, 12:46 AM
well where do i go to open python and i downloaded DrPython and SPE are they any good

Ayman
May 10th, 2007, 05:31 PM
Most of the tutorials explain this at the very beginning. To open Python, you can either use the console version by typing "python" in a terminal, or use the graphical IDE called IDLE, which you can find under Applications > Programming.