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iWill
May 1st, 2007, 09:47 PM
Hi, I'm currently learning C++ throughout books and websites which is I must admit is quite frustrating at times when you need a specific answer for something...:)
So I'm curious to know if there are any classes or even tutors to learn C++ for 16 year olds (I saw there were classes at some universities, but i guess its over 18's only right?)
Oh and btw I live in London

Thanks,
William

ios_base
May 1st, 2007, 11:14 PM
Well, there's tons of great information for the DIY type. I've heard most great game programmers are self-taught. Here's a list of great resources you can use even after you find a formal class:


http://www.cplusplus.com/
http://www.cprogramming.com/
http://www.icce.rug.nl/documents/cplusplus/
http://parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/index.html
http://www.programmersheaven.com/zone3/index.htm

thumper
May 1st, 2007, 11:52 PM
Hi William,

I'd suggest joining ACCU (www.accu.org) and then ask on their programming question mailing list.

ACCU does have a general mailing list that you don't need to be a member of to join called accu-general@accu.org.

ACCU is also in the process of organising monthly get togethers in London with speakers on various topics. Getting involved with a group like this is a great way to learn from others.

Have a look.

Jengu
May 2nd, 2007, 07:22 AM
This may not be the answer you want, but if you're looking to reduce frustration learning programming your best option is to pick a different language to start. C++ has a lot of complexity, with exceptions to rules and exceptions to the exceptions, which makes it hard for a student to find patterns. And to do anything useful requires the use of a lot of libraries outside the standard set. I'm a fan of Python for new programmers. It has an interpreter too, so you can type in lines of code one by one and see what they do, rather than having to go through the edit-compile-view-edit-compile cycle.

iWill
May 2nd, 2007, 10:11 AM
Thanks guys for the replies.
So it looks like I'm still set to teach myself although i did send an email to ACCU.


This may not be the answer you want, but if you're looking to reduce frustration learning programming your best option is to pick a different language to start. C++ has a lot of complexity, with exceptions to rules and exceptions to the exceptions, which makes it hard for a student to find patterns. And to do anything useful requires the use of a lot of libraries outside the standard set. I'm a fan of Python for new programmers. It has an interpreter too, so you can type in lines of code one by one and see what they do, rather than having to go through the edit-compile-view-edit-compile cycle.
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Sorry Jengu, but I just spent too much time now learning C++ (I'm no longer a novice but still have a lot to learn!) and I really don't want to change language now.

Anyway if any of you guys know, keep the replies coming.
Thanks

LaRoza
May 2nd, 2007, 02:02 PM
I also am self taught, and I know what it is to have nothing but books to talk to.

Joining forums, like this one and others, is a great way to expand the amount of people you can communicate with, especially with programming.

I don't know if this would work for you, but it works great for me, I like to study many things at once and cycle through each subject, that way I never get bored, learn a lot more than if I stuck with one topic, and not only learn the language, but programming in general. It is a lot easier to learn a language if you are already familiar with the concepts.

C++ does a good job of this, if you know C++ basics, Python, Java, ECMAscript, PHP, and Perl will be no trouble to learn.

So you might find it worthwhile to study two or more languages at once.

iWill
May 2nd, 2007, 06:36 PM
I also am self taught, and I know what it is to have nothing but books to talk to.

Joining forums, like this one and others, is a great way to expand the amount of people you can communicate with, especially with programming.

I don't know if this would work for you, but it works great for me, I like to study many things at once and cycle through each subject, that way I never get bored, learn a lot more than if I stuck with one topic, and not only learn the language, but programming in general. It is a lot easier to learn a language if you are already familiar with the concepts.

C++ does a good job of this, if you know C++ basics, Python, Java, ECMAscript, PHP, and Perl will be no trouble to learn.

So you might find it worthwhile to study two or more languages at once.

That's really interesting actually...I'll probably give python a go then...what's THE must have book to begin?

clblanchard
May 2nd, 2007, 06:44 PM
That's really interesting actually...I'll probably give python a go then...what's THE must have book to begin?

I've been trying to learn python myself. I found a book recommended by someone on this forum called "How To Think Like a Computer Scientist" and it's pretty neat. Lots of basic stuff and on up though more advanced things. If you go to python.org (I think) you can get it for free. Just thought you might want to check it out.

Good Luck!!

iWill
May 2nd, 2007, 07:55 PM
Thanks I'll go have a look at that.
Does anyone back this choice or have any other python book recomendations?

haricharan
May 2nd, 2007, 08:32 PM
this definitely is a good starting point www.diveintopython.org/ (http://www.diveintopython.org/)

iWill
May 2nd, 2007, 09:26 PM
Ok thanks for the answers everybody...now what's the best IDE out there to work with python?

noerrorsfound
May 3rd, 2007, 02:34 AM
this definitely is a good starting point www.diveintopython.org/ (http://www.diveintopython.org/)
That book is for experienced programmers. It's a good starting point if you already know another language but not if you're new to programming.

haricharan
May 5th, 2007, 02:13 AM
That book is for experienced programmers. It's a good starting point if you already know another language but not if you're new to programming. hmmm thats true too....sorry abt that...

aamukahvi
May 7th, 2007, 04:41 PM
Ok thanks for the answers everybody...now what's the best IDE out there to work with python?
If you go to Applications → Add/remove and type in python you'll find a couple. I read somewhere that IDLE is good but haven't dug deeper (it's ugly though and I like pretty programs :D )