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Kalixa
April 29th, 2007, 07:05 PM
Hello. I am looking into buying a python programming book from amazon. I know a little C programming because I have read C for Dummies, but that's pretty much it. So can you recommend me a book?

pmasiar
April 29th, 2007, 07:30 PM
Good choice - Python is *much* simpler to learn for beginner, especially if you do not have a teacher explaining tricks.

Great you want to buy a book... Most people want free online books. :-) and booksellers than complain there is no interest in Python - based on lack of book sales :-(

That said, maybe best investment is start with good online book, read in once, then get good reference book which you would use for long time.

For free online books for beginners, see wiki in my sig. Best reference book $10 can buy is Python pocket reference. To get free shipping, get couple other pocket references from areas you are interested. Good thing on pocket reference is, because of format limits, all tricky, complicated info which would be confusing ofr first year is squeezed out

Oreilly "Learning Python" is decent, and I heard that "Python for Dummies" is out and is very good too. Haven't seen it myself tho.

tenshu
April 29th, 2007, 10:22 PM
O'Reilly books rocks
quite expensive but always a good choice

ssam
April 29th, 2007, 10:54 PM
once you have got going get the python cookbook (o'reilly).

it wont teach you the basics, but it will teach you the most efficient ways of doing things.

msumurph
April 30th, 2007, 01:19 AM
Here are two books that I found very helpful when I started learning to program in Python. The first is an online book: Byte of Python (http://www.byteofpython.info). The second is a paperback: Learning Python (http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/lpython2/).

Good Luck!

bashologist
April 30th, 2007, 01:37 AM
O'Reilly books rocks
quite expensive but always a good choice
Yep, that's a good choice. Very good.

Here are two books that I found very helpful when I started learning to program in Python. The first is an online book: Byte of Python (http://www.byteofpython.info). The second is a paperback: Learning Python (http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/lpython2/).

Good Luck!

I'm about 325 pages into Learning Python and so far I've thought it has been great. My only complaint is that it sometimes goes over the same topic a few times -- It's a good thing they do it tho.

kano
April 30th, 2007, 04:29 AM
Personally, I liked "Python In A Nutshell" (O'Reilly)... Shows you the basics, and has alot more advanced stuff too... I'd def recommend if you've ever used any other languages.

I've been programming in python for 2-3 years now, and I still get alot of use out of it :)

duff
April 30th, 2007, 12:25 PM
Personally, I liked "Python In A Nutshell" (O'Reilly)... Shows you the basics, and has alot more advanced stuff too... I'd def recommend if you've ever used any other languages.

I've been programming in python for 2-3 years now, and I still get alot of use out of it :)

+1. This is the book I learned Python with.

sorcererx84
April 30th, 2007, 02:36 PM
I have Programming Python and it is sure worth the money. Covers everything from console apps to Web development.

Kalixa
April 30th, 2007, 08:01 PM
I have read some reviews on Amazon.co.uk. People seem to like the book, but tell that it might be a little difficult to understand if you don't know how to program some other language before reading the book. So I have a question to the guys who have read the book. Is it really hard to understand? Do you think I would be able to understand the book with my limited C knowledge. My knowledge in C goes not much further than being able to make console apps with loops, own basic functions, if and else statements, receiving input, and giving output etc. without any real knowledge in in lower level such as memory, but mostly just the high level aspect of it?

kano
May 1st, 2007, 07:25 AM
You should be fine, python is all about the high level :D

Kalixa
May 1st, 2007, 04:04 PM
You should be fine, python is all about the high level :D

Alright.. I will probably buy that book plus a reference in near time then..

elst
May 1st, 2007, 10:18 PM
If you aren't a fluent programmer than I'd vote for "Beginning Python" (Apress), which is absolutely excellent. If you look in /usr/share/doc/diveintopython/ in a default Ubuntu installation you'll find the text of "Dive into Python" (also Apress), which is good for experienced programmers.

Garyu
May 10th, 2007, 12:37 PM
http://www.diveintopython.org/
Dive into python can be downloaded freely. You don't need to buy it.

In fact, it is most probably already on your harddrive. You don't even have to download it. Just open this adress in your browser:
file:///usr/share/doc/diveintopython/html/index.html

Voila!
If you also want to look at the examples used in the book, point your IDE (or nautilus) to /usr/share/doc/diveintopython/examples